Updated on 2021/04/23

写真a

 
NISHIGORI Hiroshi
 
Organization
Graduate School of Medicine Program in Integrated Medicine Internal Medicine Professor
Title
Professor
Contact information
メールアドレス
External link

Degree 2

  1. 博士(医学) ( 2008.11   名古屋大学 ) 

  2. Master of Medical Education ( 2008.10 ) 

Research Interests 3

  1. Medical Education

  2. 文化人類学

  3. Medical Education

Research Areas 1

  1. Life Science / Medical management and medical sociology

Current Research Project and SDGs 1

  1. Medical Professionalism

Research History 3

  1. Nagoya University   Graduate School of Medicine Program in Integrated Medicine Internal Medicine   Professor

    2019.3

  2. Nagoya University

    2019.4

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    Country:Japan

  3. Kyoto University   Associate professor

    2012.1 - 2019.3

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    Country:Japan

Professional Memberships 5

  1. 韓国医学教育学会

    2017.1

  2. 欧州医学教育学会

    2014.4

  3. アジア太平洋医学教育学会

    2014.1

  4. 日本プライマリ・ケア連合学会

    2012.2

  5. 日本医学教育学会

    2009.1

Awards 1

  1. 第12号 医学教育賞(日野原賞)

    2020.8  

 

Papers 23

  1. Continuing medical education during pandemic waves of COVID-19: Consensus from medical faculties in Asia, Australia and Europe Reviewed

    Carmen Wong, Walter van den Broek, Gillian Doody, Martin Fischer, Michelle Leech, Fabrizio De Ponti, Alexander Gerbes, Hiroshi Nishigori, Young Mee Lee, Maarten Frens, Hideki Kasuya, Franco Bazzoli, Reinhard Hickel, Hong Sik Lee, J.P.T.M van Leeuwen, Christina Mitchell, Kenji Kadomatsu, John Atherton, Francis Chan

    MedEdPublish   Vol. 10 ( 1 )   2021.3

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE)  

    DOI: 10.15694/mep.2021.000064.1

  2. Differential Diagnoses That Final-Year Medical Students Need to Consider: A Modified Delphi Study Reviewed

    Yuka Urushibara-Miyachi, Makoto Kikukawa, Masatomi Ikusaka, Junji Otaki, Hiroshi Nishigori

    BMC Medical Education     2020.12

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    Authorship:Last author   Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:Research Square  

    <title>Abstract</title>
    <bold>Background</bold>: Contrastive learning is known to be effective in teaching medical students how to generate diagnostic hypotheses in clinical reasoning. However, there is no consensus on comprehensive lists of differential diagnoses across different medical disciplines regarding the common symptoms that should be learned as part of the undergraduate medical curriculum. In Japan, the national model core curriculum for undergraduate medical education was revised in 2016, and lists of differential diagnoses for 37 common symptoms were introduced into the curriculum. This study aimed to validate the list of items based on expert consensus for use as a reference worldwide.<bold>Methods</bold>: The authors used a modified Delphi method to develop consensus among a panel of 23 expert physician-teachers in clinical reasoning from across Japan. The panel evaluated the items on a 5-point Likert scale, based on whether a disease should be hypothesized by final-year medical students considering a given symptom. They also added other diseases that should be hypothesized. A positive consensus was defined as both a 75% rate of panel agreement and a mean of 4 or higher with a standard deviation of less than 1 on the 5-point scale. The study was conducted between September 2017 and March 2018. <bold>Results</bold>: This modified Delphi study identified 275 essential and 67 supplemental items corresponding to the differential diagnoses for 37 common symptoms that Japanese medical students should master before graduation. <bold>Conclusions</bold>: The lists developed in the study can be useful for teaching and learning how to generate initial hypotheses by encouraging students’ contrastive learning. Although the lists may be specific to the Japanese context, the lists and process of validation are generalizable to other countries for building national consensus on the content of medical education curricula.

    DOI: 10.21203/rs.3.rs-127514/v1

    Other Link: https://www.researchsquare.com/article/rs-127514/v1.html

  3. Failure or adaptation? - Redefining PBL from the perspective of the Safety II paradigm. Reviewed International journal

    Ikuo Shimizu, Hiroshi Nishigori

    Medical teacher   Vol. 42 ( 9 ) page: 1076 - 1077   2020.9

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    DOI: 10.1080/0142159X.2020.1729971

    Web of Science

    Scopus

    PubMed

  4. Admission policies and methods at crossroads: a review of medical school admission policies and methods in seven Asian countries. Reviewed International journal

    Diantha Soemantri, Indika Karunathilake, Jen-Hung Yang, Shan-Chwen Chang, Chyi-Her Lin, Vishna D Nadarajah, Hiroshi Nishigori, Dujeepa D Samarasekera, Shuh Shing Lee, Lilybeth R Tanchoco, Gominda Ponnamperuma

    Korean journal of medical education   Vol. 32 ( 3 ) page: 243 - 256   2020.9

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    Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    Selecting the right applicants is an important part of medical student admission. While one universally accepted selection criterion is academic capacity, there are other criteria such as communication skills and local criteria (e.g., socio-cultural values) that are no less important. This article reviews the policies and methods of selection to medical schools in seven countries with varying socio-economic conditions and healthcare systems. Senior academics involved in medical education in Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, and Taiwan completed a pre-agreed pro-forma per each country to describe the country's admission policies and methods. The details were then compared and contrasted. This review identifies tension between many of the policies and methods used in medical school admissions, such as between the need to assess non-cognitive abilities and widen access, and between the need for more medical professionals and the requirement to set high entry standards. Finding the right balance requires careful consideration of all variables, including the country's human resource needs; socio-economic status; graduates' expected competencies; and the school's vision, mission, and availability of resources.

    DOI: 10.3946/kjme.2020.169

    Scopus

    PubMed

  5. Faculty development in medical education: an environmental scan in countries within the Asia pacific region. Reviewed International journal

    Dujeepa D Samarasekera, Shuh Shing Lee, Ardi Findyartini, Rita Mustika, Hiroshi Nishigori, Shunsuke Kimura, Young-Mee Lee

    Korean journal of medical education   Vol. 32 ( 2 ) page: 119 - 130   2020.6

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    PURPOSE: In recent years, faculty development (FD) research is more noticeable within an inter-professional context and in allied health education. However, there is a paucity of published literature on FD medical education programs in Asia. With the formation of the Asia Pacific Medical Education Network (APME-Net) in 2015, a scoping review of an environmental scan of FD medical education programs in main institutions in South East Asia and Australia in 2018 was conducted. METHODS: A survey was developed to collect data on FD in medical education after several rounds of discussion with APME-Net members. The representatives from nine countries in Asia and Australia were invited to partner in this research project. They sent the questionnaire to the Dean of all different medical schools after ethical clearance. The data collected was analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Only institutions in four countries responded to the questionnaire. The medical/health professions education center/department/unit has been established in most educational institutions in these countries. These centers/departments/units mostly carry out FD programs to improve the teaching and learning skills of trained participants, particularly clinical teachers via workshops and seminars. Staffing issues and participant buy-in are the current key priorities of the center/department/unit in terms of FD. Lastly, research related FD program has not been well-supported in these countries, hence, the lack of publication in this area. CONCLUSION: Collaboration between countries to address key areas of interest and develop more standardized and productive FD medical education is required especially in research.

    DOI: 10.3946/kjme.2020.160

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  6. Doctors' experience of becoming patients and its influence on their medical practice: A literature review.

    Morishita M, Iida J, Nishigori H

    Explore (New York, N.Y.)   Vol. 16 ( 3 ) page: 145 - 151   2020.5

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    DOI: 10.1016/j.explore.2019.10.007

    PubMed

  7. Educational Problem-solving Conference as Work-based Faculty Development

    Kimura Takeshi, Tanemura Fumitaka, Kondo Takeshi, Nishigori Hiroshi

    Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)   Vol. 51 ( 5 ) page: 591 - 595   2020

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    Publisher:Japan Society for Medical Education  

    <p>We conducted a case conference to solve problems in teaching practices and for clinician teachers to discuss various issues occurring in the field. The conference was based on the presentation of individual educational practice cases from faculty development workshops approved by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. We prepared two months before the event and dealt with four cases on the day of the event. During the discussion, we tried to link educational problems with a theory or a conceptual framework in medical education so that participants, including case presenters, would have a better understanding of clinical training settings. In addition, communication across disciplines was facilitated through discussions. This attempt has the potential to contribute to the development of a community of practice related to cross-disciplinary education. The key to success for this case conference was the "interpreter" role. The person in that role considers the background and context of practice and links practice with theory appropriately. In addition, faculty development for educators who can play the role will also be an issue in the future.</p>

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.51.5_591

    CiNii Article

  8. letter to the editor : Faculty Development for Clinician Educators Using Flipped Learning

    Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)   Vol. 51 ( 2 ) page: 168 - 170   2020

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    Publisher:Japan Society for Medical Education  

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.51.2_168

    CiNii Article

  9. 医学教育研究室の抄読会から 第3回

    佐野 樹, 木村 武司, 錦織 宏

    医学教育   Vol. 51 ( 4 ) page: 466 - 467   2020

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    Publisher:日本医学教育学会  

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.51.4_466

    CiNii Article

  10. letter to the editor (Book Review) : From the Book Club of the Center for Medical Education(No. 4)Writing Qualitative Research for the First Time

    Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)   Vol. 51 ( 5 ) page: 615 - 617   2020

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    Publisher:Japan Society for Medical Education  

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.51.5_615

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  11. Doctors' experience of becoming patients and its influence on their medical practice: A literature review

    Morishita Mariko, Iida Junko, Nishigori Hiroshi

    EXPLORE-THE JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND HEALING   Vol. 16 ( 3 ) page: 145-151   2020

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    DOI: 10.1016.j.explore.2019.10.007

    Web of Science

  12. Current State and Future Opportunities for Continuing Medical Education in Japan. Reviewed International journal

    Lawrence Sherman, Hiroshi Nishigori

    Journal of European CME   Vol. 9 ( 1 ) page: 1729304 - 1729304   2020

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    Globally, CPD systems vary widely. In Japan, the Japanese Medical Association (JMA) is responsible for identifying content and developing education for its speciality practice physicians. The JMA was concerned about persistent low levels of participation in its CME activities and wanted to better understand the root causes. The analysis would provide an opportunity to restructure its programme informed by the needs of its practising clinicians. The JMA engaged a global education provider to conduct an independent analysis of its CME programme. Using a mixed-methods approach, the education provider conducted an on-line survey (N = 338) and held two in-person focus groups (N = 24) to better understand the perspectives of physicians in speciality practice. The on-line survey was sent to over 7,000 practising physicians throughout Japan. Respondents reflected a variety of medical and surgical specialities and length in clinical practice. They described factors that influenced or were barriers to participation in JMA-sponsored education. Respondents also suggested changes to the current model of CME in Japan and expressed an ongoing commitment to life-long learning and achieving the goals set forth in Japan's vision for health care in 2035: Leading the World Through Health. Globally, medical associations are challenged with developing education that meets the needs of a diverse physician workforce. Improved understanding of the perspectives of its physician members and implementation of collaborations with speciality societies may be one strategy to improve quality and address healthcare population needs. Lessons learned from this analysis may help other medical associations with similar challenges.

    DOI: 10.1080/21614083.2020.1729304

    PubMed

  13. 「医学教育研究室の抄読会から」 第2回

    木村 武司, 種村 文孝, 錦織 宏

    医学教育   Vol. 51 ( 2 ) page: 166 - 167   2020

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    Publisher:日本医学教育学会  

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.51.2_166

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  14. An Education Survey on "What is Medicine" -through the Perspective of Yonezo Nakagawa

    Toyama Shogo, Aoki Anna, Fujisaki Kazuhiko, Nishigori Hiroshi

    Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)   Vol. 51 ( 4 ) page: 379 - 388   2020

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    Publisher:Japan Society for Medical Education  

    <p>Background: We investigated how undergraduate medical curriculum handles the question "what is medicine" , which Yonezo Nakagawa raised in a field of study called "Igaku-gairon" . Method: We analyzed the content, the amount, the methods, the assessment, and the teachers using syllabi that are accessible on the Internet as resources. Results: In 69 schools, the total number of hours of instruction in "philosophy of medicine and medical ethics" , "sociology of medicine and medical anthropology" and "history of medicine" was 1066 h 20min, 213 h 5min, and 192 h 5min, respectively, representing 72%, 14%, and 13% of the total instruction. Analysis: We found that their were classes which address the question "what is medicine" without using the word "Igaku-gairon" can be sporadically found in medical curriculum.</p>

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.51.4_379

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  15. A two-edged sword: Narrative inquiry into Japanese doctors’ intrinsic motivation Reviewed

    H Nishigori, T Suzuki, T Matsui, J Busari, T Dornan

    TAPS   Vol. 4 ( 3 ) page: 24 - 32   2019.9

  16. Current status of medical education research in Japan: A meta-epidemiological investigation Reviewed

    Yuki Kataoka, Hiraku Tsujimoto, Yasushi Tsujimoto, Yuka Urushibara-Miyachi, Yuda Miyamoto, Hideto Yasuda, Hiromitsu Yamashita, Ryohei Yamamoto, Hiroshi Nishigori

    The Asia Pacific Scholar   Vol. 4 ( 2 ) page: 7 - 13   2019.5

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine  

    DOI: 10.29060/taps.2019-4-2/oa2079

  17. Professional identity formation of female doctors in Japan - gap between the married and unmarried

    Matsui Tomoko, Sato Motoki, Kato Yoko, Nishigori Hiroshi

    BMC MEDICAL EDUCATION   Vol. 19 ( 1 ) page: 55   2019.2

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    DOI: 10.1186/s12909-019-1479-0

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  18. Translation and cultural adaptation of the Japanese version of the interprofessional facilitation scale. Reviewed International journal

    Junji Haruta, Raoul Breugelmans, Hiroshi Nishigori

    Journal of interprofessional care   Vol. 32 ( 3 ) page: 321 - 328   2018.5

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    Effective interaction in interprofessional collaboration requires skills in interprofessional facilitation. The need for interprofessional learning and practice in Japan is highlighted by Japan's status as one of the most rapidly aging societies because good care for elderly people with complex needs requires effective collaboration between different professional groups. The development of interprofessional facilitation skills (including management of the additional complexities) among learners or professionals enhances interprofessional learning and consensus building and empowers them to make appropriate commitments when faced with difficult challenges. The 18-item interprofessional facilitation scale (IPFS) can be used to enhance interprofessional facilitation skills. Here, we aimed to develop a Japanese adapted version of the IPFS and to validate it for use with Japanese healthcare professionals. Consistent with guidelines for cross-cultural adaptation, three translators translated the original IPFS from English into Japanese, and an expert and all authors confirmed its face and content validity. The translated items were amended during backtranslation and expert reviews. Exploratory factor analysis was performed with 167 healthcare professionals to explore the underlying structure of the items. This analysis revealed two factors with good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha > 0.8), which were labelled as: (1) encouraging interprofessional interaction and (2) respect for each professional. The original factor 'Encouraging interprofessional interaction' was divided into two factors in the study. One reason for this division might be related to the behaviour of Japanese health professionals, that is, most Japanese might understand that 'facilitation' encourages relationships as contextual belonging that are distinct from relationships based on respect for others. This mindset is likely based on the notion of 'relationalism', which is fundamental in Japanese culture. Further investigation of this Japanese version of the IPFS will strengthen factor construction and improve scrutiny of the relationships between factors.

    DOI: 10.1080/13561820.2017.1398720

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  19. National survey of international electives for global health in undergraduate medical education in Japan, 2011-2014. Reviewed

    Tomio Suzuki, Hiroshi Nishigori

    Nagoya journal of medical science   Vol. 80 ( 1 ) page: 79 - 90   2018.2

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    Interest in global health in medical education is increasing in Western countries, whereas data from non-Western countries is scarce. Here, we conducted a nationwide study of international clinical electives at Japanese medical schools from 2011 to 2013. We constructed a 28-item cross-sectional survey in Japanese to investigate the rate and characteristics of both Japanese students going abroad and international students coming on exchange to Japan. The surveys were sent to the administrative offices of all 80 Japanese medical schools in each of the three years, through the Japan Medical Education Foundation. All 80 medical schools responded to the questionnaire (response rate, 100%). An average of 70 of the 80 medical universities provided exchange programs across the three years to allow students to travel abroad as part of the school curriculum and obtain academic credit. The schools provided support in the form of in- and outside-class preparatory programs, tuition fee exemptions and housing. The most popular destinations for Japanese students going abroad were Europe and North America, which may reflect the desire of Japanese students to acquire medical knowledge or experience through exposure to the English language. In contrast, the most common countries of origin of international exchange students coming to Japan were Asian countries such as South Korea, Thailand and Taiwan, with pediatrics being the most popular elective. Foreign exchange programs are becoming increasingly incorporated into the Japanese medical education curriculum and can help to strengthen international partnerships and collaborations.

    DOI: 10.18999/nagjms.80.1.79

    PubMed

  20. International Collaboration Between CPIRD and Center for Medical Education Kyoto University

    Arora Rajin, Sriruksa Kanokwan

    Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)   Vol. 49 ( 4 ) page: 283 - 287   2018

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:Japan Society for Medical Education  

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.49.4_283

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    Other Link: http://search.jamas.or.jp/link/ui/2019026297

  21. Incidence of Domestic Violence Against Pregnant Females after the Great East Japan Earthquake in Miyagi Prefecture: The Japan Environment and Children's Study

    Sakurai K.

    Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness   Vol. 11 ( 2 ) page: 216-226   2017.4

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    DOI: 10.1017/dmp.2016.109

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  22. Determinants of polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations in erythrocytes of pregnant Japanese women from a birth cohort study: Study protocol and baseline findings of an adjunct study of the Japan environment &amp; Children's study

    Saito S.

    Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine   Vol. 22 ( 1 )   2017

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    DOI: 10.1186/s12199-017-0636-5

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  23. How do healthcare professionals and lay people learn interactively? A case of transprofessional education. Reviewed

    Haruta J, Kitamura K, Nishigori H

    The Asia Pacific Scholar   Vol. 2 ( 3 )   2017

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

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Books 8

  1. 医師・医学生のための人類学・社会学

    飯田淳子, 錦織宏( Role: Joint author)

    ナカニシヤ出版  2021.3  ( ISBN:9784779515767

  2. 医師・医学生のための人類学・社会学 : 臨床症例/事例で学ぶ

    飯田 淳子, 錦織 宏

    ナカニシヤ出版  2021  ( ISBN:9784779515767

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  3. 指導医のための医学教育学 : 実践と科学の往復

    錦織 宏, 三好 沙耶佳

    京都大学学術出版会  2020  ( ISBN:9784814002900

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  4. 医師として知っておくべきマネジメントとリーダーシップの鉄則24の訓え

    VieraAnthony J., KramerRob, 綿貫 聡, 高尾 義明, 錦織 宏( Role: Sole author)

    丸善出版  2019  ( ISBN:9784621303986

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    Language:Japanese

    CiNii Books

  5. クラウンブリッジの臨床

    Rosenstiel Stephen F., Land Martin F., 藤本 順平, 藤本 浩平, 岡村 光信, 廣瀬 正法, 錦織 淳(歯科医)( Role: Sole author)

    エルゼビア・ジャパン  2018  ( ISBN:9784263445273

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    Language:Japanese

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  6. たたら侍

    錦織 良成, 松永 弘高( Role: Sole author)

    朝日新聞出版  2017  ( ISBN:9784022648457

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    Language:Japanese

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  7. 臨床推論

    錦織 宏( Role: Sole author)

    メディカルレビュー社  2017  ( ISBN:9784779219856

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    Language:Japanese

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  8. 理論・歴史

    渋谷 雅弘, 弘中 聡浩, 神山 弘行, 中里 実, 米田 隆(弁護士), 岡村 忠生, 金子 宏, 藤谷 武史, 太田 匡彦, 高橋 祐介, Ramseyer J. Mark, 錦織 康高, 国枝 繁樹, 森村 進, 安藤 馨, 宍戸 常寿( Role: Sole author)

    日本評論社  2017  ( ISBN:9784535065079

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    Language:Japanese

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MISC 19

  1. letter to the editor : Faculty Development for Clinician Educators Using Flipped Learning

      Vol. 51 ( 2 ) page: 168 - 170   2020.4

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    Language:Japanese  

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  2. 竜馬先生の医学教育ことはじめ(第6回・最終回)フィードバックをしよう

    田中 竜馬, 錦織 宏

    J-COSMO = ジェイ・コスモ : journal of common sense medical omnibus   Vol. 2 ( 1 ) page: 17 - 24   2020.2

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:中外医学社  

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  3. 新企画『医学教育研究室の抄読会から』 第1回

    木村 武司, 錦織 宏

    医学教育   Vol. 51 ( 1 ) page: 64 - 65   2020

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:日本医学教育学会  

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.51.1_64

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  4. 12-2 Conference on Educational Cases by Using Zoom: Online Faculty Development

    Isobe Masanori, Enomoto Takayuki, Nishigori Hiroshi

    Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)   Vol. 51 ( 3 ) page: 338 - 340   2020

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:Japan Society for Medical Education  

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.51.3_338

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  5. 9-6 Consideration for Vulnerable Learners in the Development of Online Education

    Nishigori Hiroshi, Saiki Takuya

    Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)   Vol. 51 ( 3 ) page: 309 - 311   2020

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:Japan Society for Medical Education  

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.51.3_309

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  6. 7-11 Online Problem-based Learning Combining Synchronous and Asynchronous Communication

    Kondo Takeshi, Takemi Hideki, Nishigori Hiroshi

    Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)   Vol. 51 ( 3 ) page: 276 - 278   2020

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:Japan Society for Medical Education  

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.51.3_276

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  7. 竜馬先生の医学教育ことはじめ(第5回)講義での教え方

    田中 竜馬, 錦織 宏

    J-COSMO = ジェイ・コスモ : journal of common sense medical omnibus   Vol. 1 ( 5 ) page: 805 - 811   2019.12

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:中外医学社  

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  8. 竜馬先生の医学教育ことはじめ(第4回)手技の指導

    田中 竜馬, 錦織 宏

    J-COSMO = ジェイ・コスモ : journal of common sense medical omnibus   Vol. 1 ( 4 ) page: 692 - 696   2019.10

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:中外医学社  

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  9. Exploring Social and Cultural Problems in Clinical Situations Together: Collaborative Clinical Case Conference by Health Professionals and Anthropologists

      Vol. 11 ( 2019 ) page: 392 - 425   2019.8

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    Language:Japanese  

    A clinical case conference collaborated on by health professionals and anthropologists is an opportunity in which anthropologists and (future) health professionals consider and discuss social and cultural problems in clinical situations and learn from each other. It was created through the process of collaboration between health professionals and anthropologists and has improved while being repeatedly held as workshops for primary care physicians and as classes at medical schools. In these conferences, anthropology has provided viewpoints for situating phenomena in sociocultural contexts and frameworks for verbalising social and cultural phenomena. These conferences have been highly appreciated, especially by primary care physicians. The important points are that health professionals and anthropologists share the time and space to discuss problems, and that casebased approaches begin not from anthropological concepts but clinical situations bridging cases with anthropology. The conferences are not only opportunities for anthropologists to comment and analyse the cases or educate medical students and health professionals, but also an opportunity for them to learn. Anthropologists who participate in the conferences inevitably consider how anthropology can contribute to medicine and health professionals while they consider what it is like to be 'anthropological' in the process of correspondence with (future) health professionals. This paper explores the variability of anthropology, describing what form is created in the practice of collaboration with health professionals.

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  10. 竜馬先生の医学教育ことはじめ(第3回)竜馬先生流3分エデュケーション

    田中 竜馬, 錦織 宏

    J-COSMO = ジェイ・コスモ : journal of common sense medical omnibus   Vol. 1 ( 3 ) page: 397 - 402   2019.8

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:中外医学社  

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  11. 竜馬先生の医学教育ことはじめ(第2回)教えるのはやっぱり難しい?

    田中 竜馬, 錦織 宏

    J-COSMO = ジェイ・コスモ : journal of common sense medical omnibus   Vol. 1 ( 2 ) page: 218 - 223   2019.6

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:中外医学社  

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  12. 竜馬先生の医学教育ことはじめ(第1回)エデュケっていきましょう!

    田中 竜馬, 錦織 宏

    J-COSMO = ジェイ・コスモ : journal of common sense medical omnibus   Vol. 1 ( 1 ) page: 110 - 115   2019.4

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:中外医学社  

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  13. letter to the editor : Proposal : Flipped Classroom in Faculty Development

    Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)   Vol. 50 ( 1 ) page: 81 - 83   2019

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:Japan Society for Medical Education  

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.50.1_081

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    Other Link: http://search.jamas.or.jp/link/ui/2019181178

  14. 『ヘルマン 医療人類学―文化・健康・病い』

    錦織 宏

    医学教育   Vol. 50 ( 2 ) page: 210 - 210   2019

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:日本医学教育学会  

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.50.2_210

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  15. Why Do We Write Medical Education Research Papers? A Narrative of a Retired Doctor

    Nishigori Hiroshi

    Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)   Vol. 50 ( 6 ) page: 559 - 562   2019

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:Japan Society for Medical Education  

    <p> Why do we write medical education research papers and present them at academic conferences? Why do you read medical education research papers and listen to presentations at academic conferences? Medical education is often practiced in a closed space such as a lecture room, where there is a clear power dynamic such as <teacher / supervisor> and <medical student / resident>. In this paper, we will focus on power structure and develop an argument about the significance of educational case reports in medical education research from the epistemological standpoint of critical theory structure.</p>

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.50.6_559

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    Other Link: http://search.jamas.or.jp/link/ui/2020195818

  16. Annual Meeting of the Japan Society for Medical Education Convention

    Nishigori Hiroshi

    Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)   Vol. 50 ( 1 ) page: 41 - 45   2019

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:Japan Society for Medical Education  

    <p> We analyzed the achievements of annual meetings of Japan Society for Medical Education (JSME) over the past 10 years. JSME is the biggest community in the field of medical education from the perspective of both social science and medicine. To develop the organization further, we argue that it should follow a line of inquiry that will advance science in the field as well as provide information on cutting edge faculty development within the context of Japanese medical education. To achieve this goal and facilitate continuity, we propose JSME develop a program committee for its annual meeting. We hope the meeting will provide a community of practice in which healthcare workers and researchers in the field of medical education can communicate and collaborate through the discussion of theories and practices.</p>

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.50.1_041

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  17. 3. The Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) 欧州医学教育学会

    錦織 宏

    医学教育   Vol. 49 ( 3 ) page: 188 - 191   2018

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:日本医学教育学会  

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.49.3_188

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  18. Standards for Master's Degrees Offered in Japanese for Medical and Health Profession Education

    Oikawa Sayaka, Nishigori Hiroshi

    Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)   Vol. 48 ( 5 ) page: 328 - 328   2017

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:Japan Society for Medical Education  

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.48.5_328

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  19. Workshop Report: Empathy and "Patients' Perspectives" ―Suggestion for Medical Education

    Committee on Professionalism and Behavioral Sciences the Japan Society for Medical Education, Oiso Giichiro, Yoshio Kashida, Kodama Satoshi, Nishigori Hiroshi, Hideki Nomura, Hirayama Yoji, Hoshino Shin, Yoneda Hiroshi, Izumi Shun-ichiro, Miyata Yasushi, Son Daisuke, Matsushige Takuya, Ushiyama Miho, Hatakeyama Yosuke, Misawa Jimpei, Asahina Mayumi, Iida Junko, Inoue Chikako

    Igaku Kyoiku / Medical Education (Japan)   Vol. 48 ( 5 ) page: 311 - 314   2017

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:Japan Society for Medical Education  

    <p> The importance of humanity education including "empathy" in medical education is increasing. Considering this, the Committee on Professionalism and Behavioral Sciences of the Japan Society for Medical Education organized a workshop titled, "Empathy and 'Patients' Perspectives' ―Suggestion for Medical Education" . On the basis of findings from several medical fields, including medical informatics, medical anthropology, and medical sociology, we discussed the issue of uncertainty in patients and healthcare professionals' perspectives. We concluded that healthcare professionals should not empathize with patients as a strategy for persuasion but as a way to seek a mutual and flexible decision-making model that considers the uncertainty of patient perspectives.</p>

    DOI: 10.11307/mededjapan.48.5_311

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▼display all

Presentations 3

  1. The Case of Japan as a Non-English Speaking Non-Western Developed Country. <Panel Discussion 2: How Will We Overcome the Language Barrier in Medical Education?> International conference

    Hiroshi Nishigori

    14th Asian Pacific Medical Education Conference (APMEC).  2017.1.13 

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    Language:English  

  2. Faculty Development and Culture –Lessons from Japan. <Panel Discussion 8: Faculty Development and Culture?> International conference

    Hiroshi Nishigori

    14th Asian Pacific Medical Education Conference (APMEC).  2017.1.14 

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    Language:English  

  3. Planning and Conducting Multi-Centre Research (MCR) in Medical and Health Professions Education. <Pre Conference Workshop-W2P4> International conference

    Ponnamperuma G, Nishigori H, Samarasekera DD

    14th Asian Pacific Medical Education Conference (APMEC).  2017.1.12 

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    Language:English  

KAKENHI (Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research) 5

  1. Social Interaction in Tea Ceremony: Analysis of Conversation and Behavior in Tea House

    Grant number:18KT0031  2018.07 - 2022.03

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    Authorship:Coinvestigator(s) 

  2. 人類学の外部から考える人類学の可変性と可能性:医学教育をめぐる協働の現場から

    Grant number:18H00782  2018.04 - 2022.03

    伊藤 泰信

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    Authorship:Coinvestigator(s) 

    本研究は、文化人類学(人類学と略)を取り巻く外部と人類学との関係をメタレベルで考察しつつ、将来の人類学のあり方の可変性と可能性を示すことを目的とする。とりわけ本研究では医学教育との関係でその目的を追究する。
    本研究は、日本の人類学の外部で生起している喫緊の課題(2017年3月に改訂された「医学教育モデル・コア・カリキュラム」に見られるような外部からの人類学への要請)を題材として、実践的かつメタ人類学的な検討を実施し、人類学の可変性・可能性を検討する。すなわち、医学教育にいかに人類学的な素養を導入するか、という課題をめぐる分野横断的な協働を実施しながら、それをメタレベルで考察する。「(医療者に学んでもらうべき)人類学という知のエッセンシャル・ミニマムとは何か」、ひいては「人類学という知の、何が社会から要請され(う)るのか、それに応じて人類学をどう(再)定義していくのか」というリサーチクエスチョンを学術的に(歴史的な視野の中で、また、医療に限らない 比較の視野の中で)追究するものである。具体的な計画は、【課題①】医学教育の個別の特徴を調査し、【課題②】医学教育者・医師との協働実践(症例検討会をはじめとする医学生向け人類学教育プログラムの開発)を推し進めつつ、【課題③】医学教育との関係において、人類学という学の将来のあり方を検討する。さらに、【課題④】人類学専攻者向けでない人類学教育のあり方を検討しながら上記リサーチクエスチョンを追究する、というものであった。
    昨年度に引き続き、主として【①】【②】を実践的に検討し、生起した課題を整理しつつ、【③】【④】の検討を始めるための素地を作った。医学教育者・医師と協働しながら、複数の大学および医学教育学の会合において医学教育個別の特徴を教育実践を通じて調査し、また、医学部向けの人類学教育のあり方を考えるワークショップも実施した。
    「研究実績の概要」で述べた具体的計画のうち、本年度もまずは主として【①】【②】を検討した。
    昨年に引き続き、複数の大学(川崎医大、藤田医科大、名古屋大学、兵庫医大、和歌山県立医大など)における医学教育個別の特徴を調査した。第51回日本医学教育学会大会(7月)にもメンバーは参加し、情報を収集した。医学部の教員らと協働し、「症例検討会」や「臨床実習のエスノグラフィックな歩き方」などの紹介を含む教育実践を通じた調査・検討を実施した(「臨床実習・臨床研修に文化人類学的アプローチを活用する」(1月25日、岐阜大学MEDC))。さらに、医学部の教員らと協働し、医師養成の文脈にふさしい人類学教育のあり方を考えるワークショップ(「医師とともに考える医学生向け人類学教育ワークショップ」(7月13日、東京医科大学)を実施し、課題を洗い出した。なお、メンバーが主導した日本文化人類学会公開シンポジウム「医学教育と文化人類学の新しい協働の形」(11月9日、関西大学)も情報を集める貴重な機会となった。
    なお、本研究メンバーは本研究に関わる内容の一部を『コンタクト・ゾーン』誌(11巻、2019)に寄稿している(特集「医学教育と人類学の協働のかたち」)。
    以上の実施実績から概ね順調に進展していると言いうる。
    令和2年度は、【課題①】【課題②】の調査・実践は継続しつつ、医療“以外”との比較も含めて【課題③】メタ人類学的検討に比重を移す。さらに【課題④】外部との関係から考える人類学教育に関する検討へとつなげていく。
    新型コロナウイルスの影響などを慎重に見極めながら、医学部の教員らと協働しつつ、医師養成の文脈にふさわしい人類学教育のあり方を考えるワークショップなども昨年度同様実施し、課題を追求していく。

  3. Development of Handwriting Process Data Exchange Platform and Its Application for Teaching and Learning at Higher Educational Institution

    Grant number:17H06288  2017.06 - 2020.03

    Grant-in-Aid for Challenging Research (Pioneering)

    Kita Hajime

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    Authorship:Coinvestigator(s) 

    In this project, we pay attention to human's hand-writing process and its importance in education. We developed a prototype system of collecting hand-writing process data using Digital Paper Terminals of SONY, and a system to visualize the collected data as animation. For evaluation of these systems, we also collected hand-writing process data using problems that ask questions in four educational fields in Kyoto University. We also discussed creation of platform to share hand-writing process data taking international standard of educational data into account.

  4. Developing Model Educational Program to Cultivate Prosociality -Beyond Altruism

    Grant number:15H04750  2015.04 - 2019.03

    Nishigori Hiroshi

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\17940000 ( Direct Cost: \13800000 、 Indirect Cost:\4140000 )

    (1) The results of the study on the narratives about the working styles of doctors considered to be sociopathic have been compiled and are being submitted for publication. (2) It took some time to select a video production company for the video materials based on (1). In part, this led to the creation of teaching materials. (3) A questionnaire survey on the national and international situation regarding physician sociability is ongoing. (4) A study of brain activity related to physician inotropy is currently underway to compile the research data and prepare a paper. (5) Only a pilot education program was conducted for a model education program to develop psychosocial physicians using (1) and (2) on the basis of (3) and (4).

  5. Action Research for developing learning and assessment portfolio in clinical clerkship

    Grant number:15K15166  2015.04 - 2018.03

    Nishigori Hiroshi

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\3900000 ( Direct Cost: \3000000 、 Indirect Cost:\900000 )

    In this research, we have constructed a portfolio as a learning support system for practical clinical practice participating in clinical practice which is spreading in recent years. A mentor system was established, and one mentor (all doctors) in 2 to 4 students became involved in support of students across the department of clinical medicine. Construction of the electronic portfolio system has been advanced in a form including the functions of the Learning Management System and has reached the stage of partial use in the monitor departments. In the future, we will further develop and aim to build an electronic portfolio that can be used at off-campus teaching hospitals.