Updated on 2021/10/25

写真a

 
SATO Yoshikatsu
 
Organization
Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules Designated associate professor
Graduate School
Graduate School of Science
Title
Designated associate professor
Contact information
メールアドレス

Degree 1

  1. 博士(理学) ( 2001.3   東京都立大学 ) 

Research Interests 2

  1. Cell Reprogramming

  2. Live Imaging

Research History 1

  1. Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya university   Designated associate professor

    2019.4

Education 1

  1. Tokyo Metropolitan University   Graduate School of Science   Doctor Course of Biological Science

    1998.4 - 2001.3

Professional Memberships 1

  1. THE JAPANESE SOCIETY OF PLANT PHYSIOLOGISTS

Awards 1

  1. Technical special award in the Botanical Society of Japan

    2019.9   The Botanical Society of Japan   Contribution of the Plant Imaging Research

    Nagoya University Live Imaging Center

 

Papers 68

  1. VISIONS: the art of science International journal

    Tsutsui Hiroki, Sato Yoshikatsu, Susaki Daichi, Higashiyama Tetsuya

    MOLECULAR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT   Vol. 86 ( 8 ) page: 925 - 925   2019.8

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    Web of Science

  2. Chloroplast movement: dissection of events downstream of photo- and mechano-perception.

    Sato Y, Kadota A, Wada M

    Journal of plant research   Vol. 116 ( 1 ) page: 1 - 5   2003.2

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    Language:English  

    DOI: 10.1007/s10265-002-0073-3

    PubMed

  3. Chloroplast movement.

    Wada M, Kagawa T, Sato Y

    Annual review of plant biology   Vol. 54   page: 455 - 68   2003

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  4. External Ca2+ is essential for chloroplast movement induced by mechanical stimulation but not by light stimulation Reviewed International journal

    Y Sato, M Wada, A Kadota

    PLANT PHYSIOLOGY   Vol. 127 ( 2 ) page: 497 - 504   2001.10

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    Authorship:Lead author   Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:AMER SOC PLANT BIOLOGISTS  

    In the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris, chloroplast movement is induced by mechanical stimulation as well as by light stimulation. Directional movement of both types depends an an actin-based motile system. To investigate the physiological relationship between mechanical and light signaling in the regulation of chloroplast movement, we examined the mechano-response of chloroplasts whose motility had been already restricted after photo-relocation. Chloroplast mechano-avoidance movement was induced under all of the photo-relocation conditions tested, indicating that mechano-specific signals generated by mechanical stimulation dominate over the light signals and reactivate the motility of chloroplasts. When the effects of external Ca2+ on the induction of mechano- and light responses were examined, strikingly different requirements of external Ca2+ were found for each. In medium without Ca2+, the mechano-response was suppressed but no effects were observed on photo-response. Mechano-relocation movement of chloroplasts was inhibited by 100 muM lanthanum (La3+), a plasma membrane calcium channel blocker, and by 10 muM gadolinium (Gd3+), a stretch-activated channel blocker. However, the same concentrations of these drugs did not affect the photo-relocation movement at all. These results suggest that the influx of external Ca2+ is crucial for the early signaling step of chloroplast mechano-relocation but not for that of photo-relocation. This is the first report showing the separation of signaling pathways in mechano- and photo-relocation of chloroplasts.

    DOI: 10.1104/pp.127.2.497

    Web of Science

  5. Choice of tracks, microtubules and/or actin filaments for chloroplast photo-movement is differentially controlled by phytochrome and a blue light receptor Reviewed International journal

    Y Sato, M Wada, A Kadota

    JOURNAL OF CELL SCIENCE   Vol. 114 ( 2 ) page: 269 - 279   2001.1

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    Authorship:Lead author   Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:COMPANY OF BIOLOGISTS LTD  

    Light induced chloroplast movement has been studied as a model system for photoreception and actin microfilament (MF)-based intracellular motilities in plants. Chloroplast photo-accumulation and -avoidance movement is mediated by phytochrome as well as blue light (BL) receptor in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Here we report the discovery of an involvement of a microtubule (MT)-based system in addition to an MF-based system in photorelocation of chloroplasts in this moss. In the dark, MTs provided tracks for rapid movement of chloroplasts in a longitudinal direction and MFs contributed the tracks for slow movement in any direction. We found that phytochrome responses utilized only the MT-based system, while BL responses had an alternative way of moving, either along MTs or MFs, MT-based systems were mediated by both photoreceptors, but chloroplasts showed movements with different velocity and pattern between them. No apparent difference in the behavior of chloroplast movement between the accumulation and avoidance movement was detected in phytochrome responses or BL responses, except for the direction of the movement. The results presented here demonstrate that chloroplasts use both MTs and MFs for motility and that phytochrome and a BL receptor control directional photo-movement of chloroplasts through the differential regulation of these motile systems.

    Web of Science

  6. Mechanically induced avoidance response of chloroplasts in fern protonemal cells Reviewed International journal

    Y Sato, A Kadota, M Wada

    PLANT PHYSIOLOGY   Vol. 121 ( 1 ) page: 37 - 44   1999.9

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    Authorship:Lead author   Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:AMER SOC PLANT PHYSIOLOGISTS  

    Cell response to mechanical stimulation was investigated at a subcellular level in protonemal cells of the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris L. by pressing a small part of the cell with a microcapillary. In cells receiving local stimulation, the chloroplasts moved away from the site of stimulation, whereas the nuclei failed to show such avoidance movement. Mechanical stimulation for a period as short as 0.3 min was enough to induce the avoidance response to a maximal level. The avoidance movement of chloroplasts started within 30 min and the plateau level of avoidance was attained around 2 h after stimulation. By tracing the movement of chloroplasts during the response, it was shown that the mobility of chloroplasts near the stimulation site increased transiently within 1 h after the stimulation. After 2 to 3 h, it slowed down to the control level without stimulation. The avoidance response was inhibited by 0.1 mM cytochalasin B and 25 mM 2,3-butanedione monoxime but not by 3.3 mu M amiprophosmethyl or 5 mM colchicine. These findings indicate that the protonemal cells were very sensitive to mechanical stimulation and that chloroplasts moved away from the mechanically stimulated site through the actomyosin motile system.

    DOI: 10.1104/pp.121.1.37

    Web of Science

  7. Dynamics of mitochondrial distribution during development and asymmetric division of rice zygotes. International journal

    Hanifah Aini, Yoshikatsu Sato, Kakishi Uno, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Takashi Okamoto

    Plant reproduction     2021.10

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    KEY MESSAGE: Mitochondria change their distribution from nuclear peripheral to uniformly distributed in cytoplasm during zygotic development of rice, and the mitochondria re-distribute around nucleus for even segregation into daughter cells. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that actively move and change their localization along with actin filaments during the cell cycle. Studies of mitochondrial dynamics and distribution in plant cells have mainly been conducted on somatic cells, and our understanding about these aspects during the formation and development of zygotes remains limited. In this study, mitochondrial nucleoids of rice egg cells and zygotes were successfully stained by using N-aryl pyrido cyanine 3 (PC3), and their intracellular localization and distribution were demonstrated. Mitochondria in rice egg cells were small and coccoid in shape and were primarily distributed around the nucleus. Upon gamete fusion, the resulting zygotes showed mitochondrial dispersion and accumulation equivalent to those in rice egg cells until 8 h after fusion (HAF). Around 12 HAF, the mitochondria started to disperse throughout the cytoplasm of the zygotes, and this dispersive distribution pattern continued until the zygotes entered the mitotic phase. At early prophase, the mitochondria redistributed from dispersive to densely accumulated around the nucleus, and during the metaphase and anaphase, the mitochondria were depleted from possible mitotic spindle region. Thereafter, during cell plate formation between daughter nuclei, the mitochondria distributed along the phragmoplast, where the new cell wall was formed. Finally, relatively equivalent amounts of mitochondria were detected in the apical and basal cells which were produced through asymmetric division of the zygotes. Further observation by treating the egg cell with latrunculin B revealed that the accumulation of mitochondria around the nuclear periphery in egg cells and early zygotes depended on the actin meshwork converging toward the egg or zygote nucleus.

    DOI: 10.1007/s00497-021-00430-3

    PubMed

  8. N-aryl pyrido cyanine derivatives are nuclear and organelle DNA markers for two-photon and super-resolution imaging. International journal

    Kakishi Uno, Nagisa Sugimoto, Yoshikatsu Sato

    Nature communications   Vol. 12 ( 1 ) page: 2650 - 2650   2021.5

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    Live cell imaging using fluorescent DNA markers are an indispensable molecular tool in various biological and biomedical fields. It is a challenge to develop DNA probes that avoid UV light photo-excitation, have high specificity for DNA, are cell-permeable and are compatible with cutting-edge imaging techniques such as super-resolution microscopy. Herein, we present N-aryl pyrido cyanine (N-aryl-PC) derivatives as a class of long absorption DNA markers with absorption in the wide range of visible light. The high DNA specificity and membrane permeability allow the staining of both organelle DNA as well as nuclear DNA, in various cell types, including plant tissues, without the need for washing post-staining. N-aryl-PC dyes are also highly compatible with a separation of photon by lifetime tuning method in stimulated emission depletion microscopy (SPLIT-STED) for super-resolution imaging as well as two-photon microscopy for deep tissue imaging, making it a powerful tool in the life sciences.

    DOI: 10.1038/s41467-021-23019-w

    PubMed

  9. Trade-off between Plasticity and Velocity in Mycelial Growth. International journal

    Sayumi Fukuda, Riho Yamamoto, Naoki Yanagisawa, Naoki Takaya, Yoshikatsu Sato, Meritxell Riquelme, Norio Takeshita

    mBio   Vol. 12 ( 2 )   2021.3

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    Tip-growing fungal cells maintain cell polarity at the apical regions and elongate by de novo synthesis of the cell wall. Cell polarity and tip growth rate affect mycelial morphology. However, it remains unclear how both features act cooperatively to determine cell shape. Here, we investigated this relationship by analyzing hyphal tip growth of filamentous fungi growing inside extremely narrow 1 μm-width channels of microfluidic devices. Since the channels are much narrower than the diameter of hyphae, any hypha growing through the channel must adapt its morphology. Live-cell imaging analyses revealed that hyphae of some species continued growing through the channels, whereas hyphae of other species often ceased growing when passing through the channels, or had lost apical polarity after emerging from the other end of the channel. Fluorescence live-cell imaging analyses of the Spitzenkörper, a collection of secretory vesicles and polarity-related proteins at the hyphal tip, in Neurospora crassa indicates that hyphal tip growth requires a very delicate balance of ordered exocytosis to maintain polarity in spatially confined environments. We analyzed the mycelial growth of seven fungal species from different lineages, including phytopathogenic fungi. This comparative approach revealed that the growth defects induced by the channels were not correlated with their taxonomic classification or with the width of hyphae, but, rather, correlated with the hyphal elongation rate. This report indicates a trade-off between morphological plasticity and velocity in mycelial growth and serves to help understand fungal invasive growth into substrates or plant/animal cells, with direct impact on fungal biotechnology, ecology, and pathogenicity.IMPORTANCE Cell morphology, which is controlled by polarity and growth, is fundamental for all cellular functions. However how polarity and growth act cooperatively to control cell shape remains unclear. Here we investigated their relationship by analyzing hyphal tip growth of filamentous fungi growing inside extremely narrow 1 μm-width channels of microfluidic devices. We found that most fast growing hyphae often lost the cell polarity after emerging from the channels, whereas slow growing hyphae retained polarity and continued growing, indicating a trade-off between plasticity and velocity in mycelial growth. These results serve to understand fungal invasive growth into substrates or plant/animal cells, with direct impact on fungal biotechnology, ecology and pathogenicity.

    DOI: 10.1128/mBio.03196-20

    PubMed

  10. Two atypical AUGUSTIFOLIA without a plant-specific C-terminus regulate gametophore and sporophyte shapes in the moss Physcomitrium (Physcomitrella) patens. International journal

    Katsuaki Takechi, Hiroaki Nagase, Tomoyuki Furuya, Koro Hattori, Yoshikatsu Sato, Kensuke Miyajima, Tomofumi Higuchi, Ryuya Matsuda, Susumu Takio, Hirokazu Tsukaya, Hiroyoshi Takano

    The Plant journal : for cell and molecular biology   Vol. 105 ( 5 ) page: 1390 - 1399   2021.3

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    ANGUSTIFOLIA (AN) is a plant-specific subfamily of the CtBP/BARS/AN family, characterized by a plant-specific C-terminal domain of approximately 200 amino acids. Previously, we revealed that double knockout (DKO) lines of Physcomitrium (Physcomitrella) patens ANGUSTIFOLIA genes (PpAN1-1 and PpAN1-2) show defects in gametophore height and the lengths of the seta and foot region of sporophytes, by reduced cell elongation. In addition to two canonical ANs, the genome of P. patens has two atypical ANs without a coding region for a plant-specific C-terminus (PpAN2-1 and PpAN2-2); these were investigated in this study. Similar to PpAN1s, both promoters of the PpAN2 genes were highly active in the stems of haploid gametophores and in the middle-to-basal region of young diploid sporophytes that develop into the seta and foot. Analyses of PpAN2-1/2-2 DKO and PpAN quadruple knockout (QKO) lines implied that these four AN genes have partially redundant functions to regulate cell elongation in their expression regions. Transgenic strains harboring P. patens α-tubulin fused to green fluorescent protein, which were generated from a QKO line, showed that the orientation of the microtubules in the gametophore tips in the PpAN QKO lines was unchanged from the wild-type and PpAN1-1/1-2 DKO plants. In addition to both PpAN2-1 and PpAN2-2, short Arabidopsis AN without the C-terminus of 200 amino acids could rescue the Arabidopsis thaliana an-1 phenotypes, implying AN activity is dependent on the N-terminal regions.

    DOI: 10.1111/tpj.15121

    PubMed

  11. Subnuclear gene positioning through lamina association affects copper tolerance. International journal

    Yuki Sakamoto, Mayuko Sato, Yoshikatsu Sato, Akihito Harada, Takamasa Suzuki, Chieko Goto, Kentaro Tamura, Kiminori Toyooka, Hiroshi Kimura, Yasuyuki Ohkawa, Ikuko Hara-Nishimura, Shingo Takagi, Sachihiro Matsunaga

    Nature communications   Vol. 11 ( 1 ) page: 5914 - 5914   2020.11

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    The nuclear lamina plays an important role in the regulation of chromatin organization and gene positioning in animals. CROWDED NUCLEI (CRWN) is a strong candidate for the plant nuclear lamina protein in Arabidopsis thaliana but its biological function was largely unknown. Here, we show that CRWNs localize at the nuclear lamina and build the meshwork structure. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and RNA-seq analyses revealed that CRWNs regulate chromatin distribution and gene expression. More than 2000 differentially expressed genes were identified in the crwn1crwn4 double mutant. Copper-associated (CA) genes that form a gene cluster on chromosome 5 were among the downregulated genes in the double mutant exhibiting low tolerance to excess copper. Our analyses showed this low tolerance to copper was associated with the suppression of CA gene expression and that CRWN1 interacts with the CA gene locus, enabling the locus to localize at the nuclear lamina under excess copper conditions.

    DOI: 10.1038/s41467-020-19621-z

    PubMed

  12. Ran-GTP Is Non-essential to Activate NuMA for Mitotic Spindle-Pole Focusing but Dynamically Polarizes HURP Near Chromosomes. International journal

    Kenta Tsuchiya, Hisato Hayashi, Momoko Nishina, Masako Okumura, Yoshikatsu Sato, Masato T Kanemaki, Gohta Goshima, Tomomi Kiyomitsu

    Current biology : CB     2020.10

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    Spindle assembly is spatially regulated by a chromosome-derived Ran- GTP gradient. Previous work proposed that Ran-GTP activates spindle assembly factors (SAFs) around chromosomes by dissociating inhibitory importins from SAFs. However, it is unclear whether the Ran-GTP gradient equivalently activates SAFs that localize at distinct spindle regions. In addition, Ran's dual functions in interphase nucleocytoplasmic transport and mitotic spindle assembly have made it difficult to assess its mitotic roles in somatic cells. Here, using auxin-inducible degron technology in human cells, we developed acute mitotic depletion assays to dissect Ran's mitotic roles systematically and separately from its interphase function. In contrast to the prevailing model, we found that the Ran pathway is not essential for spindle assembly activities that occur at sites spatially separated from chromosomes, including activating NuMA for spindle-pole focusing or for targeting TPX2. On the other hand, Ran-GTP is required to localize HURP and HSET specifically at chromosome-proximal regions to set proper spindle length during prometaphase. We demonstrated that Ran-GTP and importin-β coordinately promote HURP's dynamic microtubule binding-dissociation cycle, which maintains HURP near chromosomes during metaphase. Together, we propose that the Ran pathway acts on spindle assembly independently of its interphase functions in mitotic human cells but does not equivalently regulate all Ran-regulated SAFs. Ran-dependent spindle assembly is likely coupled with additional parallel pathways that activate SAFs distantly located from the chromosomes.

    DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2020.09.091

    PubMed

  13. Post-Assembly Photomasking of Potassium Acyltrifluoroborates (KATs) for Two-Photon 3D Patterning of PEG-Hydrogels Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Haewon Song, Dino Wu, Dimitry Mazunin, Sizhou M. Liu, Yoshikatsu Sato, Nicolas Broguiere, Marcy Zenobi-Wong, Jeffrey W. Bode

    HELVETICA CHIMICA ACTA     2020.10

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:WILEY-V C H VERLAG GMBH  

    Chemical ligation reactions of functional groups that can be masked with two-photon labile protecting groups provide a powerful technology for the three-dimensional patterning of molecules - including proteins - onto hydrogel scaffolds. In order to utilize readily prepared hydrogels constructed by the potassium acyltrifluoroborate (KAT)-hydroxylamine amide formation ligation for two-photon patterning, we have developed a unique post-polymerization protecting group strategy through the reaction of KATs and dithiols in water and deprotection by two-photon excitation. After precise 3D spatially confined light irradiation, the unprotected KATs undergo ligations with hydroxylamine-functionalized superfolder GFP and sulforhodamine B for the composition of three-dimensional patterns.

    DOI: 10.1002/hlca.202000172

    Web of Science

  14. Cell-cell adhesion in plant grafting is facilitated by β-1,4-glucanases. Reviewed International journal

    Michitaka Notaguchi, Ken-Ichi Kurotani, Yoshikatsu Sato, Ryo Tabata, Yaichi Kawakatsu, Koji Okayasu, Yu Sawai, Ryo Okada, Masashi Asahina, Yasunori Ichihashi, Ken Shirasu, Takamasa Suzuki, Masaki Niwa, Tetsuya Higashiyama

    Science (New York, N.Y.)   Vol. 369 ( 6504 ) page: 698 - 702   2020.8

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    Plant grafting is conducted for fruit and vegetable propagation, whereby a piece of living tissue is attached to another through cell-cell adhesion. However, graft compatibility limits combinations to closely related species, and the mechanism is poorly understood. We found that Nicotiana is capable of graft adhesion with a diverse range of angiosperms. Comparative transcriptomic analyses on graft combinations indicated that a subclade of β-1,4-glucanases secreted into the extracellular region facilitates cell wall reconstruction near the graft interface. Grafting was promoted by overexpression of the β-1,4-glucanase. Using Nicotiana stem as an interscion, we produced tomato fruits on rootstocks from other plant families. These findings demonstrate that the process of cell-cell adhesion is a potential target to enhance plant grafting techniques.

    DOI: 10.1126/science.abc3710

    PubMed

  15. Two ANGUSTIFOLIA genes regulate gametophore and sporophyte development in Physcomitrella patens. Reviewed International journal

    Yoshikazu Hashida, Katsuaki Takechi, Tomomi Abiru, Noriyuki Yabe, Hiroaki Nagase, Koro Hattori, Susumu Takio, Yoshikatsu Sato, Mitsuyasu Hasebe, Hirokazu Tsukaya, Hiroyoshi Takano

    The Plant journal : for cell and molecular biology   Vol. 101 ( 6 ) page: 1318 - 1330   2020.3

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    In Arabidopsis thaliana the ANGUSTIFOLIA (AN) gene regulates the width of leaves by controlling the diffuse growth of leaf cells in the medio-lateral direction. In the genome of the moss Physcomitrella patens, we found two normal ANs (PpAN1-1 and 1-2). Both PpAN1 genes complemented the A. thaliana an-1 mutant phenotypes. An analysis of spatiotemporal promoter activity of each PpAN1 gene, using transgenic lines that contained each PpAN1-promoter- uidA (GUS) gene, showed that both promoters are mainly active in the stems of haploid gametophores and in the middle to basal region of the young sporophyte that develops into the seta and foot. Analyses of the knockout lines for PpAN1-1 and PpAN1-2 genes suggested that these genes have partially redundant functions and regulate gametophore height by controlling diffuse cell growth in gametophore stems. In addition, the seta and foot were shorter and thicker in diploid sporophytes, suggesting that cell elongation was reduced in the longitudinal direction, whereas no defects were detected in tip-growing protonemata. These results indicate that both PpAN1 genes in P. patens function in diffuse growth of the haploid and diploid generations but not in tip growth. To visualize microtubule distribution in gametophore cells of P. patens, transformed lines expressing P. patens α-tubulin fused to sGFP were generated. Contrary to expectations, the orientation of microtubules in the tips of gametophores in the PpAN1-1/1-2 double-knockout lines was unchanged. The relationships among diffuse cell growth, cortical microtubules and AN proteins are discussed.

    DOI: 10.1111/tpj.14592

    PubMed

  16. Arabidopsis GEX1 Is a Nuclear Membrane Protein of Gametes Required for Nuclear Fusion During Reproduction Reviewed International journal

    Shuh-ichi Nishikawa, Yuki Yamaguchi, Chiharu Suzuki, Ayaka Yabe, Yuzuru Sato, Daisuke Kurihara, Yoshikatsu Sato, Daichi Susaki, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Daisuke Maruyama

    FRONTIERS IN PLANT SCIENCE   Vol. 11   page: 548032   2020

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    During the life cycle of flowering plants, nuclear fusion, or karyogamy, occurs three times: once during female gametogenesis, when the two polar nuclei fuse in the central cell, and twice during double fertilization. In Arabidopsis thaliana, nuclear fusion events during sexual reproduction proceed without the breakdown of the nuclear envelope, indicating that nuclear membrane fusion is essential for the completion of this process. Arabidopsis gamete expressed 1 (GEX1) is a membrane protein that is conserved among plant species. GEX1 shares homology with the yeast karyogamy protein Kar5, which is primarily expressed in the nuclear membrane. The GEX1 family represents a putative karyogamy factor. Herein, we show that GEX1 is required for the nuclear fusion events in Arabidopsis reproduction. GEX1-deficient mature female gametophytes were found to contain two unfused polar nuclei in close proximity within the central cell. Electron microscopy showed that the outer membrane of the polar nuclei was connected via the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas the inner membrane remained unfused. These results indicate that GEX1 is involved in polar nuclear membrane fusion following the fusion of the outer nuclear membrane. Furthermore, sperm nuclear fusion events were defective in the fertilized egg and central cell following plasmogamy in the fertilization of gex1-1 female gametophytes by gex1-1 pollen. An analysis of GEX1 localization in the female gametophyte using a transgenic line expressing GFP-tagged GEX1 driven by the GEX1 promoter showed that GEX1 is a nuclear membrane protein in the egg and central cell. Time-lapse live-cell imaging showed that in developing female gametophytes, the nuclear GFP-GEX1 signal was first detectable in the central cell shortly before the polar nuclei came in close contact, and then in the egg cell. Thus, we suggest that the GEX1-family proteins are nuclear membrane proteins involved in karyogamy in the reproduction of eukaryotes including flowering plants.

    DOI: 10.3389/fpls.2020.548032

    Web of Science

    PubMed

  17. Hydrophobicity and CH/π-interaction-driven self-assembly of amphiphilic aromatic hydrocarbons into nanosheets. Reviewed International journal

    Nishikawa T, Narita H, Ogi S, Sato Y, Yamaguchi S

    Chemical communications (Cambridge, England)   Vol. 55 ( 99 ) page: 14950 - 14953   2019.12

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    DOI: 10.1039/c9cc08070h

    Web of Science

    PubMed

  18. Role of Reelin in cell positioning in the cerebellum and the cerebellum-like structure in zebrafish. Reviewed International journal

    Nimura T, Itoh T, Hagio H, Hayashi T, Di Donato V, Takeuchi M, Itoh T, Inoguchi F, Sato Y, Yamamoto N, Katsuyama Y, Del Bene F, Shimizu T, Hibi M

    Developmental biology   Vol. 455 ( 2 ) page: 393 - 408   2019.11

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    DOI: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2019.07.010

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  19. The Effect of Branching on the One- and Two-Photon Absorption, Cell Viability, and Localization of Cationic Triarylborane Chromophores with Dipolar versus Octupolar Charge Distributions for Cellular Imaging Reviewed International journal

    Griesbeck Stefanie, Michail Evripidis, Rauch Florian, Ogasawara Hiroaki, Wang Chenguang, Sato Yoshikatsu, Edkins Robert M, Zhang Zuolun, Taki Masayasu, Lambert Christoph, Yamaguchi Shigehiro, Marder Todd B

    CHEMISTRY-A EUROPEAN JOURNAL   Vol. 25 ( 57 ) page: 13164 - 13175   2019.10

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    DOI: 10.1002/chem.201902461

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  20. A photostable fluorescent marker for the superresolution live imaging of the dynamic structure of the mitochondrial cristae. Reviewed International journal

    Chenguang Wang, Masayasu Taki, Yoshikatsu Sato, Yasushi Tamura, Hideyuki Yaginuma, Yasushi Okada, Shigehiro Yamaguchi

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America   Vol. 116 ( 32 ) page: 15817 - 15822   2019.8

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    Stimulation emission depletion (STED) microscopy enables ultrastructural imaging of organelle dynamics with a high spatiotemporal resolution in living cells. For the visualization of the mitochondrial membrane dynamics in STED microscopy, rationally designed mitochondrial fluorescent markers with enhanced photostability are required. Herein, we report the development of a superphotostable fluorescent labeling reagent with long fluorescence lifetime, whose design is based on a structurally reinforced naphthophosphole fluorophore that is conjugated with an electron-donating diphenylamino group. The combination of long-lived fluorescence and superphotostable features of the fluorophore allowed us to selectively capture the ultrastructures of the mitochondrial cristae with a resolution of ∼60 nm when depleted at 660 nm. This chemical tool provides morphological information of the cristae, which has so far only been observed in fixed cells using electron microscopy. Moreover, this method gives information about the dynamic ultrastructures such as the intermembrane fusion in different mitochondria as well as the intercristae mergence in a single mitochondrion during the apoptosis-like mitochondrial swelling process.

    DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1905924116

    Web of Science

    PubMed

  21. Microtubule depletion domain 1 localizes at the boundary between female gametes in Arabidopsis thaliana Reviewed International journal

    Hiroki Tsutsui, Yoshikatsu Sato, Daichi Susaki, Tetsuya Higashiyama

    Molecular Reproduction & Development     2019.7

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    DOI: 10.1002/mrd.23175

  22. Physcomitrella STEMIN transcription factor induces stem cell formation with epigenetic reprogramming Reviewed International journal

    Ishikawa Masaki, Morishita Mio, Higuchi Yohei, Ichikawa Shunsuke, Ishikawa Takaaki, Nishiyama Tomoaki, Kabeya Yukiko, Hiwatashi Yuji, Kurata Tetsuya, Kubo Minoru, Shigenobu Shuji, Tamada Yosuke, Sato Yoshikatsu, Hasebe Mitsuyasu

    NATURE PLANTS   Vol. 5 ( 7 ) page: 681 - 690   2019.7

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    DOI: 10.1038/s41477-019-0464-2

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  23. Tuning the π-bridge of quadrupolar triarylborane chromophores for one- and two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of lysosomes in live cells. Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Griesbeck S, Michail E, Wang C, Ogasawara H, Lorenzen S, Gerstner L, Zang T, Nitsch J, Sato Y, Bertermann R, Taki M, Lambert C, Yamaguchi S, Marder TB

    Chemical science   Vol. 10 ( 20 ) page: 5405 - 5422   2019.5

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    DOI: 10.1039/c9sc00793h

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  24. Characterization of the Nicotianamine Exporter ENA1 in Rice. Reviewed International journal

    Nozoye T, von Wirén N, Sato Y, Higashiyama T, Nakanishi H, Nishizawa NK

    Frontiers in plant science   Vol. 10   page: 502   2019

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    DOI: 10.3389/fpls.2019.00502

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  25. A Highly Photostable Near-Infrared Labeling Agent Based on a Phospha-rhodamine for Long-Term and Deep Imaging. Reviewed International journal

    Marek Grzybowski, Masayasu Taki, Kieko Senda, Yoshikatsu Sato, Tetsuro Ariyoshi, Yasushi Okada, Ryosuke Kawakami, Takeshi Imamura, Shigehiro Yamaguchi

    Angewandte Chemie (International ed. in English)   Vol. 57 ( 32 ) page: 10137 - 10141   2018.8

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    Various fluorescence microscopy techniques require bright NIR-emitting fluorophores with high chemical and photostability. Now, the significant performance improvement of phosphorus-substituted rhodamine dyes (PORs) upon substitution at the 9-position with a 2,6-dimethoxyphenyl group is reported. The thus obtained dye PREX 710 was used to stain mitochondria in living cells, which allowed long-term and three-color imaging in the vis-NIR range. Moreover, the high fluorescence longevity of PREX 710 allows tracking a dye-labeled biomolecule by single-molecule microscopy under physiological conditions. Deep imaging of blood vessels in mice brain has also been achieved using the bright NIR-emitting PREX 710-dextran conjugate.

    DOI: 10.1002/anie.201804731

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  26. Development of Microfluidic Devices to Study the Elongation Capability of Tip-growing Plant Cells in Extremely Small Spaces. Reviewed International journal

    Yanagisawa N, Sugimoto N, Higashiyama T, Sato Y

    Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE   ( 135 )   2018.5

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    DOI: 10.3791/57262

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  27. A far-red emitting fluorescent probe for cytosolic Ca2+ion based on phospha-fluorescein scaffold

    Ogasawara Hiroaki, Taki Masayasu, Sato Yoshikatsu, Yamaguchi Shigehiro

    ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY   Vol. 255   page: .   2018.3

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  28. A Water-Soluble Warped Nanographene: Synthesis and Applications for Photoinduced Cell Death Reviewed International journal

    Hsing-An Lin, Yoshikatsu Sato, Yasutomo Segawa, Taishi Nishihara, Nagisa Sugimoto, Lawrence T. Scott, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Kenichiro Itami

    Angewandte Chemie - International Edition   Vol. 57 ( 11 ) page: 2874 - 2878   2018.3

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    Nanographene, a small piece of graphene, has attracted unprecedented interest across diverse scientific disciplines particularly in organic electronics. The biological applications of nanographenes, such as bioimaging, cancer therapies and drug delivery, provide significant opportunities for breakthroughs in the field. However, the intrinsic aggregation behavior and low solubility of nanographenes, which stem from their flat structures, hamper their development for bioapplications. Herein, we report a water-soluble warped nanographene (WNG) that can be easily synthesized by sequential regioselective C−H borylation and cross-coupling reactions of the saddle-shaped WNG core structure. The saddle-shaped structure and hydrophilic tetraethylene glycol chains impart high water solubility to the WNG. The water-soluble WNG possesses a range of promising properties including good photostability and low cytotoxicity. Moreover, the water-soluble WNG was successfully internalized into HeLa cells and promoted photoinduced cell death.

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  29. A far-red fluorescent probe based on a phospha-fluorescein scaffold for cytosolic calcium imaging Reviewed International journal

    Hiroaki Ogasawara, Marek Grzybowski, Riho Hosokawa, Yoshikatsu Sato, Masayasu Taki, Shigehiro Yamaguchi

    Chemical Communications   Vol. 54 ( 3 ) page: 299 - 302   2018.1

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    The far-red emissive fluorescent probe CaPF-1 based on a phospha-fluorescein scaffold enables the detection of cytosolic calcium ions in living cells. The probe can be excited in the red region (λabs = 636 nm) and exhibits a sufficiently high fluorescence turn-on response in the far-red region (λem = 663 nm) upon complexation with calcium ions. The hydrophilic and anionic characteristics of this phospha-fluorescein fluorophore allowed the cytosolic localization of CaPF-1. Moreover, it was possible to visualize histamine-induced calcium oscillation in HeLa cells using CaPF-1.

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  30. Spatiotemporal deep imaging of syncytium induced by the soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines Reviewed International journal

    Mina Ohtsu, Yoshikatsu Sato, Daisuke Kurihara, Takuya Suzaki, Masayoshi Kawaguchi, Daisuke Maruyama, Tetsuya Higashiyama

    PROTOPLASMA   Vol. 254 ( 6 ) page: 2107 - 2115   2017.11

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    Parasite infections cause dramatic anatomical and ultrastructural changes in host plants. Cyst nematodes are parasites that invade host roots and induce a specific feeding structure called a syncytium. A syncytium is a large multinucleate cell formed by cell wall dissolution-mediated cell fusion. The soybean cyst nematode (SCN), Heterodera glycines, is a major soybean pathogen. To investigate SCN infection and the syncytium structure, we established an in planta deep imaging system using a clearing solution ClearSee and two-photon excitation microscopy (2PEM). Using this system, we found that several cells were incorporated into the syncytium; the nuclei increased in size and the cell wall openings began to be visible at 2 days after inoculation (DAI). Moreover, at 14 DAI, in the syncytium developed in the cortex, there were thickened concave cell wall pillars that resembled "Parthenon pillars." In contrast, there were many thick board-like cell walls and rarely Parthenon pillars in the syncytium developed in the stele. We revealed that the syncytia were classified into two types based on the pattern of the cell wall structures, which appeared to be determined by the position of the syncytium inside roots. Our results provide new insights into the developmental process of syncytium induced by cyst nematode and a better understanding of the three-dimensional structure of the syncytium in host roots.

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  31. Live imaging reveals the dynamics and regulation of mitochondrial nucleoids during the cell cycle in Fucci2-HeLa cells Reviewed International journal

    Taeko Sasaki, Yoshikatsu Sato, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Narie Sasaki

    SCIENTIFIC REPORTS   Vol. 7 ( 1 ) page: 11257   2017.9

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    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is organized in nucleoprotein complexes called mitochondrial nucleoids (mt-nucleoids), which are critical units of mtDNA replication and transmission. In humans, several hundreds of mt-nucleoids exist in a cell. However, how numerous mt-nucleoids are maintained during the cell cycle remains elusive, because cell cycle synchronization procedures affect mtDNA replication. Here, we analyzed regulation of the maintenance of mt-nucleoids in the cell cycle, using a fluorescent cell cycle indicator, Fucci2. Live imaging of mt-nucleoids with higher temporal resolution showed frequent attachment and detachment of mt-nucleoids throughout the cell cycle. TFAM, an mtDNA packaging protein, was involved in the regulation of this dynamic process, which was important for maintaining proper mt-nucleoid number. Both an increase in mt-nucleoid number and activation of mtDNA replication occurred during S phase. To increase mt-nucleoid number, mtDNA replication, but not nuclear DNA replication, was necessary. We propose that these dynamic and regulatory processes in the cell cycle maintain several hundred mt-nucleoids in proliferating cells.

    DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-10843-8

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  32. Super-Photostable Phosphole-Based Dye for Multiple-Acquisition Stimulated Emission Depletion Imaging Reviewed International journal

    Chenguang Wang, Masayasu Taki, Yoshikatsu Sato, Aiko Fukazawa, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Shigehiro Yamaguchi

    JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY   Vol. 139 ( 30 ) page: 10374 - 10381   2017.8

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    As stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy can provide structural details of cells with an optical resolution beyond the diffraction limit, it has become an indispensable tool in cell biology. However, the intense STED laser beam usually causes rapid photobleaching of the employed fluorescent dyes, which significantly limits the utility of STED microscopy from a practical perspective. Herein we report a new design of super-photostable dye, PhoxBright 430 (PB430), comprising a fully ring-fused pi-conjugated skeleton with an electron-accepting phosphole pi-oxide unit. We previously developed a super-photostable dye C-Naphox by combining the phosphole unit with an electron-donating triphenylamine moiety. In PB430, removal of the amino group alters the transition type from intramolecular charge transfer character to pi-pi* transition character, which gives rise to intense fluorescence insensitive to molecular environment in terms of fluorescence colors and intensity, and bright fluorescence even in aqueous media. PB430 also furnishes high solubility in water, and is capable of labeling proteins with maintaining high fluorescence quantum yields. This dye exhibits outstanding resistance to photoirradiation even under the STED conditions and allows continuous acquisition of STED images. Indeed, using a PB430-conjugated antibody, we succeed in attaining a 3-D reconstruction of super-resolution STED images as well as photostability-based multicolor STED imaging of fluorescently labeled cytoskeletal structures.

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  33. Fluorescent Labeling of the Cyst Nematode Heterodera glycines in Deep-Tissue Live Imaging Reviewed International journal

    Mina Ohtsu, Daisuke Kurihara, Yoshikatsu Sato, Takuya Suzaki, Masayoshi Kawaguchi, Daisuke Maruyama, Tetsuya Higashiyama

    CYTOLOGIA   Vol. 82 ( 3 ) page: 251 - 259   2017.6

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    Nematode infection of plant roots is a paradigm of host parasite interactions. Although nematodes can be labeled with fluorescent dyes, migration of the worms into the deep regions of host roots makes them difficult to track. Here we report the use of two fluorescent dyes, FM4-64 and SYBR green I, to intensely label the soybean cyst nematode (SCN) Heterodera glycines for one week in host plants. Continuous monitoring of the labeled SCN juveniles was achieved with two-photon microscopy. Additionally, we developed a transient transformation system consisting of the non-model leguminous plant (fabaceous) roots, Astragalus sinicus and Agrobacterium rhizogenes to observe the cellular structures of the plant during SCN infection. By the combined use of fluorescent dyes and two-photon microscopy, clear images of infecting SCNs were obtained even in deep regions of A. sinicus roots. The fluorescent labeling described herein can also be used in detailed monitoring of the infection processes of other non-model nematodes, as well as the associated morphological changes in the host plant roots.

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  34. Cells reprogramming to stem cells inhibit the reprogramming of adjacent cells in the moss Physcomitrella patens Reviewed International journal

    Yoshikatsu Sato, Nagisa Sugimoto, Tadayoshi Hirai, Akihiro Imai, Minoru Kubo, Yuji Hiwatashi, Tomoaki Nishiyama, Mitsuyasu Hasebe

    Scientific Reports   Vol. 7 ( 1 ) page: 1909   2017.5

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    Under certain circumstances differentiated cells can be reprogrammed to form stem cells in land plants, but only a portion of the cells reprograms successfully. A long-distance inhibitory signal from reprogrammed cells to surrounding cells has been reported in some ferns. Here we show the existence of anisotropic inhibitory signal to regulate stem cell formation in the moss Physcomitrella patens. When single cells were isolated from a gametophore leaf, over 90% of them were reprogrammed to stem cells with characteristic nuclear expansion. By contrast, when two adjacent cells were isolated, the nuclei of both cells expanded, but successful reprogramming of both cells occurred only in approximately one fifth of the pairs. When three aligned cells were isolated, the reprogramming rate of both edge cells decreased with a living middle cell but did not with a dead middle cell. Furthermore, unequal conversion into stem cells was more prominent in cell pairs aligned parallel to the proximal-distal leaf axis than in those perpendicular to the axis. This study gives an insight into the role of the inhibitory signal in development and evolution as well as the efficient stem cell induction from differentiated cells.

    DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-01786-1

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  35. Capability of tip-growing plant cells to penetrate into extremely narrow gaps Reviewed International journal

    Naoki Yanagisawa, Nagisa Sugimoto, Hideyuki Arata, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Yoshikatsu Sato

    SCIENTIFIC REPORTS   Vol. 7 ( 1 ) page: 1403   2017.5

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    Plant cells are covered with rigid cell walls, yet tip-growing cells can elongate by providing new cell wall material to their apical regions. Studies of the mechanical properties of tip-growing plant cells typically involve measurement of the turgor pressure and stiffness of the cells' apical regions. These experiments, however, do not address how living tip-growing cells react when they encounter physical obstacles that are not substantially altered by turgor pressure. To investigate this issue, we constructed microfabricated platforms with a series of artificial gaps as small as 1 mu m, and examined the capability of tip-growing plant cells, including pollen tubes, root hairs, and moss protonemata, to penetrate into these gaps. The cells were grown inside microfluidic chambers and guided towards the gaps using microdevices customized for each cell type. All types of tip-growing cells could grow through the microgaps with their organelles intact, even though the gaps were much smaller than the cylindrical cell diameter. Our findings reveal the dramatic physiological and developmental flexibility of tip-growing plant cells. The microfluidic platforms designed in this study provide novel tools for the elucidation of the mechanical properties of tip-growing plant cells in extremely small spaces.

    DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-01610-w

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  36. A Lin28 homologue reprograms differentiated cells to stem cells in the moss Physcomitrella patens Reviewed International journal

    Chen Li, Yusuke Sako, Akihiro Imai, Tomoaki Nishiyama, Kari Thompson, Minoru Kubo, Yuji Hiwatashi, Yukiko Kabeya, Dale Karlson, Shu-Hsing Wu, Masaki Ishikawa, Takashi Murata, Philip N. Benfey, Yoshikatsu Sato, Yosuke Tamada, Mitsuyasu Hasebe

    Nature Communications   Vol. 8   page: 14242   2017.1

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    Both land plants and metazoa have the capacity to reprogram differentiated cells to stem cells. Here we show that the moss Physcomitrella patens Cold-Shock Domain Protein 1 (PpCSP1) regulates reprogramming of differentiated leaf cells to chloronema apical stem cells and shares conserved domains with the induced pluripotent stem cell factor Lin28 in mammals. PpCSP1 accumulates in the reprogramming cells and is maintained throughout the reprogramming process and in the resultant stem cells. Expression of PpCSP1 is negatively regulated by its 30-untranslated region (3'-UTR). Removal of the 3'-UTR stabilizes PpCSP1 transcripts, results in accumulation of PpCSP1 protein and enhances reprogramming. A quadruple deletion mutant of PpCSP1 and three closely related PpCSP genes exhibits attenuated reprogramming indicating that the PpCSP genes function redundantly in cellular reprogramming. Taken together, these data demonstrate a positive role of PpCSP1 in reprogramming, which is similar to the function of mammalian Lin28.

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  37. Key Structural Elements of Unsymmetrical Cyanine Dyes for Highly Sensitive Fluorescence Turn-On DNA Probes Reviewed International journal

    Kakishi Uno, Taeko Sasaki, Nagisa Sugimoto, Hideto Ito, Taishi Nishihara, Shinya Hagihara, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Narie Sasaki, Yoshikatsu Sato, Kenichiro Itami

    CHEMISTRY-AN ASIAN JOURNAL   Vol. 12 ( 2 ) page: 233 - 238   2017.1

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    Unsymmetrical cyanine dyes, such as thiazole orange, are useful for the detection of nucleic acids with fluorescence because they dramatically enhance the fluorescence upon binding to nucleic acids. Herein, we synthesized a series of unsymmetrical cyanine dyes and evaluated their fluorescence properties. A systematic structure-property relationship study has revealed that the dialkylamino group at the 2-position of quinoline in a series of unsymmetrical cyanine dyes plays a critical role in the fluorescence enhancement. Four newly designed unsymmetrical cyanine dyes showed negligible intrinsic fluorescence in the free state and strong fluorescence upon binding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a quantum yield of 0.53 to 0.90, which is 2 to 3 times higher than previous unsymmetrical cyanine dyes. A detailed analysis of the fluorescence lifetime revealed that the dialkylamino group at the 2-position of quinoline suppressed nonradiative decay in favor of increased fluorescence quantum yield. Moreover, these newly developed dyes were able to stain the nucleus specifically in fixed HeLa cells examined by using a confocal laser-scanning microscope.

    DOI: 10.1002/asia.201601430

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  38. Cytoskeleton dynamics control the first asymmetric cell division in Arabidopsis zygote Reviewed International journal

    Yusuke Kimata, Takumi Higaki, Tomokazu Kawashima, Daisuke Kurihara, Yoshikatsu Sato, Tomomi Yamada, Seiichiro Hasezawa, Frederic Berger, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Minako Ueda

    PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA   Vol. 113 ( 49 ) page: 14157 - 14162   2016.12

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    The asymmetric cell division of the zygote is the initial and crucial developmental step in most multicellular organisms. In flowering plants, whether zygote polarity is inherited from the preexisting organization in the egg cell or reestablished after fertilization has remained elusive. How dynamically the intracellular organization is generated during zygote polarization is also unknown. Here, we used a live-cell imaging system with Arabidopsis zygotes to visualize the dynamics of the major elements of the cytoskeleton, microtubules (MTs), and actin filaments (F-actins), during the entire process of zygote polarization. By combining image analysis and pharmacological experiments using specific inhibitors of the cytoskeleton, we found features related to zygote polarization. The preexisting alignment of MTs and F-actin in the egg cell is lost on fertilization. Then, MTs organize into a transverse ring defining the zygote subapical region and driving cell outgrowth in the apical direction. F-actin forms an apical cap and longitudinal arrays and is required to position the nucleus to the apical region of the zygote, setting the plane of the first asymmetrical division. Our findings show that, in flowering plants, the preexisting cytoskeletal patterns in the egg cell are lost on fertilization and that the zygote reorients the cytoskeletons to perform directional cell elongation and polar nuclear migration.

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  39. A Macrocyclic Fluorophore Dimer with Flexible Linkers: Bright Excimer Emission with a Long Fluorescence Lifetime Reviewed International journal

    Hiroshi Osaki, Chih-Ming Chou, Masayasu Taki, Kai Welke, Daisuke Yokogawa, Stephan Irle, Yoshikatsu Sato, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Shohei Saito, Aiko Fukazawa, Shigehiro Yamaguchi

    ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION   Vol. 55 ( 25 ) page: 7131 - 7135   2016.6

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    Bright fluorescent molecules with long fluorescence lifetimes are important for the development of lifetime-based fluorescence imaging techniques. Herein, a molecular design is described for simultaneously attaining long fluorescence lifetime (tau) and high brightness (Phi(F) x epsilon) in a system that features macrocyclic dimerization of fluorescent p-conjugated skeletons with flexible linkers. An alkylene-linked macrocyclic dimer of bis(thienylethynyl)anthracene was found to show excimer emission with a long fluorescence lifetime (tau approximate to 19 ns) in solution, while maintaining high brightness. A comparison with various relevant derivatives revealed that the macrocyclic structure and the length of the alkylene chains play crucial roles in attaining these properties. In vitro time-gated imaging experiments were conducted as a proof-of-principle for the superiority of this macrocyclic fluorophore relative to the commercial fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor 488.

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  40. The AMOR Arabinogalactan Sugar Chain Induces Pollen-Tube Competency to Respond to Ovular Guidance. Reviewed International journal

    Akane G Mizukami, Rie Inatsugi, Jiao Jiao, Toshihisa Kotake, Keiko Kuwata, Kento Ootani, Satohiro Okuda, Subramanian Sankaranarayanan, Yoshikatsu Sato, Daisuke Maruyama, Hiroaki Iwai, Estelle Garénaux, Chihiro Sato, Ken Kitajima, Yoichi Tsumuraya, Hitoshi Mori, Junichiro Yamaguchi, Kenichiro Itami, Narie Sasaki, Tetsuya Higashiyama

    Current biology : CB   Vol. 26 ( 8 ) page: 1091 - 7   2016.4

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    Precise directional control of pollen-tube growth by pistil tissue is critical for successful fertilization of flowering plants [1-3]. Ovular attractant peptides, which are secreted from two synergid cells on the side of the egg cell, have been identified [4-6]. Emerging evidence suggests that the ovular directional cue is not sufficient for successful guidance but that competency control by the pistil is critical for the response of pollen tubes to the attraction signal [1, 3, 7]. However, the female molecule for this competency induction has not been reported. Here we report that ovular methyl-glucuronosyl arabinogalactan (AMOR) induces competency of the pollen tube to respond to ovular attractant LURE peptides in Torenia fournieri. We developed a method for assaying the response capability of a pollen tube by micromanipulating an ovule. Using this method, we showed that pollen tubes growing through a cut style acquired a response capability in the medium by receiving a sufficient amount of a factor derived from mature ovules of Torenia. This factor, named AMOR, was identified as an arabinogalactan polysaccharide, the terminal 4-O-methyl-glucuronosyl residue of which was necessary for its activity. Moreover, a chemically synthesized disaccharide, the β isomer of methyl-glucuronosyl galactose (4-Me-GlcA-β-(1→6)-Gal), showed AMOR activity. No specific sugar-chain structure of plant extracellular matrix has been identified as a bioactive molecule involved in intercellular communication. We suggest that the AMOR sugar chain in the ovary renders the pollen tube competent to the chemotropic response prior to final guidance by LURE peptides.

    DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2016.02.040

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  41. A Macrocyclic Fluorophore Dimer with Flexible Linkers: Bright Excimer Emission with a Long Fluorescence Lifetime Reviewed International journal

    Hiroshi Osaki, Chih-Ming Chou, Masayasu Taki, Kai Welke, Daisuke Yokogawa, Stephan Irle, Yoshikatsu Sato, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Shohei Saito, Aiko Fukazawa, Shigehiro Yamaguchi

    Angewandte Chemie   Vol. 128 ( 25 ) page: 7247   2016.4

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    DOI: 10.1002/ange.201602239

  42. Phospha-fluorescein: a red-emissive fluorescein analogue with high photobleaching resistance Reviewed International journal

    Aiko Fukazawa, Shinji Suda, Masayasu Taki, Eriko Yamaguchi, Marek Grzybowski, Yoshikatsu Sato, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Shigehiro Yamaguchi

    CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS   Vol. 52 ( 6 ) page: 1120 - 1123   2016

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    Phospha-fluorescein (POF), a phosphine oxide-containing analogue of fluorescein, was synthesized and its photophysical properties were examined. Compared with fluorescein and sila-fluorescein, POF displayed significantly red-shifted absorption and fluorescence as well as superior photobleaching resistance, while retaining the pH-responsive characteristics of fluorescein dyes.

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  43. A Phosphole Oxide Based Fluorescent Dye with Exceptional Resistance to Photobleaching: A Practical Tool for Continuous Imaging in STED Microscopy Reviewed International journal

    Chenguang Wang, Aiko Fukazawa, Masayasu Taki, Yoshikatsu Sato, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Shigehiro Yamaguchi

    ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION   Vol. 54 ( 50 ) page: 15213 - 15217   2015.12

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    The development of stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy represented a major breakthrough in cellular and molecular biology. However, the intense laser beams required for both excitation and STED usually provoke rapid photobleaching of fluorescent molecular probes, which significantly limits the performance and practical utility of STED microscopy. We herein developed a photoresistant fluorescent dye C-Naphox as a practical tool for STED imaging. With excitation using either a lambda = 405 or 488 nm laser in protic solvents, C-Naphox exhibited an intense red/orange fluorescence (quantum yield phi(F) > 0.7) with a large Stokes shift (circa 5900 cm(-1)). Even after irradiation with a Xe lamp (300 W, lambda(ex) = 460 nm, full width at half maximum (FWHM) = 11 nm) for 12 hours, 99.5 % of C-Naphox remained intact. The high photoresistance of C-Naphox allowed repeated STED imaging of HeLa cells. Even after recording 50 STED images, 83 % of the initial fluorescence intensity persisted.

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  44. Lactic acid is a sperm motility inactivation factor in the sperm storage tubules Reviewed International journal

    Mei Matsuzaki, Shusei Mizushima, Gen Hiyama, Noritaka Hirohashi, Kogiku Shiba, Kazuo Inaba, Tomohiro Suzuki, Hideo Dohra, Toshiyuki Ohnishi, Yoshikatsu Sato, Tetsuya Kohsaka, Yoshinobu Ichikawa, Yusuke Atsumi, Takashi Yoshimura, Tomohiro Sasanami

    SCIENTIFIC REPORTS   Vol. 5   page: 17643   2015.12

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    Although successful fertilization depends on timely encounters between sperm and egg, the decoupling of mating and fertilization often confers reproductive advantages to internally fertilizing animals. In several vertebrate groups, postcopulatory sperm viability is prolonged by storage in specialized organs within the female reproductive tract. In birds, ejaculated sperm can be stored in a quiescent state within oviductal sperm storage tubules (SSTs), thereby retaining fertilizability for up to 15 weeks at body temperature (41 degrees C); however, the mechanism by which motile sperm become quiescent within SSTs is unknown. Here, we show that low oxygen and high lactic acid concentrations are established in quail SSTs. Flagellar quiescence was induced by lactic acid in the concentration range found in SSTs through flagellar dynein ATPase inactivation following cytoplasmic acidification (<pH 6.0). The long-term preservation of sperm morphology under hypoxic and high temperature conditions indicates that a combination of these factors enables sperm cells to survive during the ovulation cycles. Our findings suggested a novel physiological role for lactic acid in promoting sperm quiescence in SSTs and opened up a new opportunity for technological improvement in prolonging sperm longevity at ambient or body temperature.

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  45. ClearSee: a rapid optical clearing reagent for whole-plant fluorescence imaging Reviewed International journal

    Daisuke Kurihara, Yoko Mizuta, Yoshikatsu Sato, Tetsuya Higashiyama

    DEVELOPMENT   Vol. 142 ( 23 ) page: 4168 - 4179   2015.12

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    Imaging techniques for visualizing and analyzing precise morphology and gene expression patterns are essential for understanding biological processes during development in all organisms. With the aid of chemical screening, we developed a clearing method using chemical solutions, termed ClearSee, for deep imaging of morphology and gene expression in plant tissues. ClearSee rapidly diminishes chlorophyll autofluorescence while maintaining fluorescent protein stability. By adjusting the refractive index mismatch, whole-organ and whole-plant imaging can be performed by both confocal and two-photon excitation microscopy in ClearSee-treated samples. Moreover, ClearSee is applicable to multicolor imaging of fluorescent proteins to allow structural analysis of multiple gene expression. Given that ClearSee is compatible with staining by chemical dyes, the technique is useful for deep imaging in conjunction with genetic markers and for plant species not amenable to transgenic approaches. This method is useful for whole imaging for intact morphology and will help to accelerate the discovery of new phenomena in plant biological research.

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  46. Quantification of pollen tube attraction in response to guidance by female gametophyte tissue using artificial microscale pathway Reviewed International journal

    Yoshikatsu Sato, Nagisa Sugimoto, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Hideyuki Arata

    JOURNAL OF BIOSCIENCE AND BIOENGINEERING   Vol. 120 ( 6 ) page: 697 - 700   2015.12

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    We developed two types of artificial platforms, T-junction and crossroad microchannel devices, and obtained guidance response ratio of pollen tubes to the female tissue as 56-57%. The crossroad device was also able to collect the attracted pollen tubes with high purity, which is useful for future omics analysis. (c) 2015, The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. All rights reserved.

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  47. Type IV Collagen Controls the Axogenesis of Cerebellar Granule Cells by Regulating Basement Membrane Integrity in Zebrafish Reviewed International journal

    Miki Takeuchi, Shingo Yamaguchi, Shigenobu Yonemura, Kisa Kakiguchi, Yoshikatsu Sato, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Takashi Shimizu, Masahiko Hibi

    PLOS GENETICS   Vol. 11 ( 10 )   2015.10

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    Granule cells (GCs) are the major glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellum, and GC axon formation is an initial step in establishing functional cerebellar circuits. In the zebrafish cerebellum, GCs can be classified into rostromedial and caudolateral groups, according to the locations of their somata in the corresponding cerebellar lobes. The axons of the GCs in the caudolateral lobes terminate on crest cells in the dorsal hindbrain, as well as forming en passant synapses with Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. In the zebrafish mutant shiomaneki, the caudolateral GCs extend aberrant axons. Positional cloning revealed that the shiomaneki (sio) gene locus encodes Col4a6, a subunit of type IV collagen, which, in a complex with Col4a5, is a basement membrane (BM) component. Both col4a5 and col4a6 mutants displayed similar abnormalities in the axogenesis of GCs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Although type IV collagen is reported to control axon targeting by regulating the concentration gradient of an axonal guidance molecule Slit, Slit overexpression did not affect the GC axons. The structure of the BM surrounding the tectum and dorsal hindbrain was disorganized in the col4a5 and col4a6 mutants. Moreover, the abnormal axogenesis of the caudolateral GCs and the RGCs was coupled with aberrant BM structures in the type IV collagen mutants. The regrowth of GC axons after experimental ablation revealed that the original and newly formed axons displayed similar branching and extension abnormalities in the col4a6 mutants. These results collectively suggest that type IV collagen controls GC axon formation by regulating the integrity of the BM, which provides axons with the correct path to their targets.

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  48. PARASITIC PLANTS. Probing strigolactone receptors in Striga hermonthica with fluorescence. Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Yuichiro Tsuchiya, Masahiko Yoshimura, Yoshikatsu Sato, Keiko Kuwata, Shigeo Toh, Duncan Holbrook-Smith, Hua Zhang, Peter McCourt, Kenichiro Itami, Toshinori Kinoshita, Shinya Hagihara

    Science (New York, N.Y.)   Vol. 349 ( 6250 ) page: 864 - 868   2015.8

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    Elucidating the signaling mechanism of strigolactones has been the key to controlling the devastating problem caused by the parasitic plant Striga hermonthica. To overcome the genetic intractability that has previously interfered with identification of the strigolactone receptor, we developed a fluorescence turn-on probe, Yoshimulactone Green (YLG), which activates strigolactone signaling and illuminates signal perception by the strigolactone receptors. Here we describe how strigolactones bind to and act via ShHTLs, the diverged family of α/β hydrolase-fold proteins in Striga. Live imaging using YLGs revealed that a dynamic wavelike propagation of strigolactone perception wakes up Striga seeds. We conclude that ShHTLs function as the strigolactone receptors mediating seed germination in Striga. Our findings enable access to strigolactone receptors and observation of the regulatory dynamics for strigolactone signal transduction in Striga.

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  49. Environment-Sensitive Fluorescent Probe: A Benzophosphole Oxide with an Electron-Donating Substituent Reviewed International journal

    Eriko Yamaguchi, Chenguang Wang, Aiko Fukazawa, Masayasu Taki, Yoshikatsu Sato, Taeko Sasaki, Minako Ueda, Narie Sasaki, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Shigehiro Yamaguchi

    ANGEWANDTE CHEMIE-INTERNATIONAL EDITION   Vol. 54 ( 15 ) page: 4539 - 4543   2015.4

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    Electron-donating aryl groups were attached to electron-accepting benzophosphole skeletons. Among several derivatives thus prepared, one benzophosphole oxide was particularly interesting, as it retained high fluorescence quantum yields even in polar and protic solvents. This phosphole-based compound exhibited a drastic color change of its fluorescence spectrum as a function of the solvent polarity, while the absorption spectra remained virtually unchanged. Capitalizing on these features, this phosphole-based compound was used to stain adipocytes, in which the polarity of subcellular compartments could then be discriminated on the basis of the color change of the fluorescence emission.

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  50. A red-emitting ratiometric fluorescent probe based on a benzophosphole P-oxide scaffold for the detection of intracellular sodium ions Reviewed International journal

    Masayasu Taki, Hiroaki Ogasawara, Hiroshi Osaki, Aiko Fukazawa, Yoshikatsu Sato, Kimi Ogasawara, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Shigehiro Yamaguchi

    CHEMICAL COMMUNICATIONS   Vol. 51 ( 59 ) page: 11880 - 11883   2015

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    We disclose the development of a ratiometric fluorescent probe based on a benzophosphole P-oxide and its application for the detection of intracellular Na+ ions. Excitation by visible light induced red emission from this probe in water, which was subjected to a hypsochromic shift upon complexation with Na+. Based on this change, a ratiometric analysis enabled us to visualise changes in the Na+ concentration in living mammalian cells.

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  51. Type IV Collagen Controls the Axogenesis of Cerebellar Granule Cells by Regulating Basement Membrane Integrity in Zebrafish Reviewed International journal

    Miki Takeuchi, Shingo Yamaguchi, Shigenobu Yonemura, Kisa Kakiguchi, Yoshikatsu Sato, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Takashi Shimizu, Masahiko Hibi

    PLoS Genetics   Vol. 11 ( 10 ) page: e1005587   2015

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    Granule cells (GCs) are the major glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellum, and GC axon formation is an initial step in establishing functional cerebellar circuits. In the zebrafish cerebellum, GCs can be classified into rostromedial and caudolateral groups, according to the locations of their somata in the corresponding cerebellar lobes. The axons of the GCs in the caudolateral lobes terminate on crest cells in the dorsal hindbrain, as well as forming en passant synapses with Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. In the zebrafish mutant shiomaneki, the caudolateral GCs extend aberrant axons. Positional cloning revealed that the shiomaneki (sio) gene locus encodes Col4a6, a subunit of type IV collagen, which, in a complex with Col4a5, is a basement membrane (BM) component. Both col4a5 and col4a6 mutants displayed similar abnormalities in the axogenesis of GCs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Although type IV collagen is reported to control axon targeting by regulating the concentration gradient of an axonal guidance molecule Slit, Slit overexpression did not affect the GC axons. The structure of the BM surrounding the tectum and dorsal hindbrain was disorganized in the col4a5 and col4a6 mutants. Moreover, the abnormal axogenesis of the caudolateral GCs and the RGCs was coupled with aberrant BM structures in the type IV collagen mutants. The regrowth of GC axons after experimental ablation revealed that the original and newly formed axons displayed similar branching and extension abnormalities in the col4a6 mutants. These results collectively suggest that type IV collagen controls GC axon formation by regulating the integrity of the BM, which provides axons with the correct path to their targets.

    DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1005587

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  52. WOX13-like genes are required for reprogramming of leaf and protoplast cells into stem cells in the moss Physcomitrella patens Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Keiko Sakakibara, Pascal Reisewitz, Tsuyoshi Aoyama, Thomas Friedrich, Sayuri Ando, Yoshikatsu Sato, Yosuke Tamada, Tomoaki Nishiyama, Yuji Hiwatashi, Tetsuya Kurata, Masaki Ishikawa, Hironori Deguchi, Stefan A. Rensing, Wolfgang Werr, Takashi Murata, Mitsuyasu Hasebe, Thomas Laux

    DEVELOPMENT   Vol. 141 ( 8 ) page: 1660 - 70   2014.4

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    Many differentiated plant cells can dedifferentiate into stem cells, reflecting the remarkable developmental plasticity of plants. In the moss Physcomitrella patens, cells at the wound margin of detached leaves become reprogrammed into stem cells. Here, we report that two paralogous P. patens WUSCHEL-related homeobox 13-like ( PpWOX13L) genes, homologs of stem cell regulators in flowering plants, are transiently upregulated and required for the initiation of cell growth during stem cell formation. Concordantly, Delta ppwox13l deletion mutants fail to upregulate genes encoding homologs of cell wall loosening factors during this process. During the moss life cycle, most of the Delta ppwox13l mutant zygotes fail to expand and initiate an apical stem cell to form the embryo. Our data show that PpWOX13L genes are required for the initiation of cell growth specifically during stem cell formation, in analogy to WOX stem cell functions in seed plants, but using a different cellular mechanism.

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  53. Kinesins Have a Dual Function in Organizing Microtubules during Both Tip Growth and Cytokinesis in Physcomitrella patens Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Yuji Hiwatashi, Yoshikatsu Sato, John H. Doonan

    PLANT CELL   Vol. 26 ( 3 ) page: 1256 - 1266   2014.3

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    Microtubules (MTs) play a crucial role in the anisotropic deposition of cell wall material, thereby affecting the direction of growth. A wide range of tip-growing cells display highly polarized cell growth, and MTs have been implicated in regulating directionality and expansion. However, the molecular machinery underlying MT dynamics in tip-growing plant cells remains unclear. Here, we show that highly dynamic MT bundles form cyclically in the polarized expansion zone of the moss Physcomitrella patens caulonemal cells through the coalescence of growing MT plus ends. Furthermore, the plant-specific kinesins (KINID1) that are is essential for the proper MT organization at cytokinesis also regulate the turnover of the tip MT bundles as well as the directionality and rate of cell growth. The plus ends of MTs grow toward the expansion zone, and KINID1 is necessary for the stability of a single coherent focus of MTs in the center of the zone, whose formation coincides with the accumulation of KINID1. We propose that KINID-dependent MT bundling is essential for the correct directionality of growth as well as for promoting growth per se. Our findings indicate that two localized cell wall deposition processes, tip growth and cytokinesis, previously believed to be functionally and evolutionarily distinct, share common and plant-specific MT regulatory components.

    DOI: 10.1105/tpc.113.121723

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  54. Septins promote dendrite and axon development by negatively regulating microtubule stability via HDAC6-mediated deacetylation Reviewed International journal

    Natsumi Ageta-Ishihara, Takaki Miyata, Chika Ohshima, Masahiko Watanabe, Yoshikatsu Sato, Yuki Hamamura, Tetsuya Higashiyama, Ralph Mazitschek, Haruhiko Bito, Makoto Kinoshita

    NATURE COMMUNICATIONS   Vol. 4   page: 2532   2013

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    Neurite growth requires two guanine nucleotide-binding protein polymers of tubulins and septins. However, whether and how those cytoskeletal systems are coordinated was unknown. Here we show that the acute knockdown or knockout of the pivotal septin subunit SEPT7 from cerebrocortical neurons impairs their interhemispheric and cerebrospinal axon projections and dendritogenesis in perinatal mice, when the microtubules are severely hyperacetylated. The resulting hyperstabilization and growth retardation of microtubules are demonstrated in vitro. The phenotypic similarity between SEPT7 depletion and the pharmacological inhibition of a-tubulin deacetylase HDAC6 reveals that HDAC6 requires SEPT7 not for its enzymatic activity, but to associate with acetylated a-tubulin. These and other findings indicate that septins provide a physical scaffold for HDAC6 to achieve efficient microtubule deacetylation, thereby negatively regulating microtubule stability to an optimal level for neuritogenesis. Our findings shed light on the mechanisms underlying the HDAC6-mediated coupling of the two ubiquitous cytoskeletal systems during neural development.

    DOI: 10.1038/ncomms3532

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  55. System for Stable beta-Estradiol-Inducible Gene Expression in the Moss Physcomitrella patens Reviewed International journal

    Minoru Kubo, Akihiro Imai, Tomoaki Nishiyama, Masaki Ishikawa, Yoshikatsu Sato, Tetsuya Kurata, Yuji Hiwatashi, Ralf Reski, Mitsuyasu Hasebe

    PLOS ONE   Vol. 8 ( 9 ) page: e77356   2013

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    Inducible transgene expression provides a useful tool to analyze gene function. The moss Physcomitrella patens is a model basal land plant with well-developed research tools, including a high efficiency of gene targeting and substantial genomics resources. However, current systems for controlled transgene expression remain limited. Here we report the development of an estrogen receptor mediated inducible gene expression system, based on the system used in flowering plants. After identifying the appropriate promoters to drive the chimeric transducer, we succeeded in inducing transcription over 1,000-fold after 24 h incubation with beta-estradiol. The P. patens system was also effective for high-level long-term induction of gene expression; transcript levels of the activated gene were maintained for at least seven days on medium containing beta-estradiol. We also established two potentially neutral targeting sites and a set of vectors for reproducible expression of two transgenes. This beta-estradiol-dependent system will be useful to test genes individually or in combination, allowing stable, inducible transgenic expression in P. patens.

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  56. The KAC Family of Kinesin-Like Proteins is Essential for the Association of Chloroplasts with the Plasma Membrane in Land Plants Reviewed International journal

    Noriyuki Suetsugu, Yoshikatsu Sato, Hidenori Tsuboi, Masahiro Kasahara, Takato Imaizumi, Takatoshi Kagawa, Yuji Hiwatashi, Mitsuyasu Hasebe, Masamitsu Wada

    PLANT AND CELL PHYSIOLOGY   Vol. 53 ( 11 ) page: 1854 - 65   2012.11

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    Chloroplasts require association with the plasma membrane for movement in response to light and for appropriate positioning within the cell to capture photosynthetic light efficiently. In Arabidopsis, CHLOROPLAST UNUSUAL POSITIONING 1 (CHUP1), KINESIN-LIKE PROTEIN FOR ACTIN-BASED CHLOROPLAST MOVEMENT 1 (KAC1) and KAC2 are required for both the proper movement of chloroplasts and the association of chloroplasts with the plasma membrane, through the reorganization of short actin filaments located on the periphery of the chloroplasts. Here, we show that KAC and CHUP1 orthologs (AcKAC1, AcCHUP1A and AcCHUP1B, and PpKAC1 and PpKAC2) play important roles in chloroplast positioning in the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and the moss Physcomitrella patens. The knockdown of AcKAC1 and two AcCHUP1 genes induced the aggregation of chloroplasts around the nucleus. Analyses of A. capillus-veneris mutants containing perinuclear-aggregated chloroplasts confirmed that AcKAC1 is required for chloroplast-plasma membrane association. In addition, P. patens lines in which two KAC genes had been knocked out showed an aggregated chloroplast phenotype similar to that of the fern kac1 mutants. These results indicate that chloroplast positioning and movement are mediated through the activities of KAC and CHUP1 proteins, which are conserved in land plants.

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  57. Physcomitrella Cyclin-Dependent Kinase A Links Cell Cycle Reactivation to Other Cellular Changes during Reprogramming of Leaf Cells Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Masaki Ishikawa, Takashi Murata, Yoshikatsu Sato, Tomoaki Nishiyama, Yuji Hiwatashi, Akihiro Imai, Mina Kimura, Nagisa Sugimoto, Asaka Akita, Yasuko Oguri, William E. Friedman, Mitsuyasu Hasebe, Minoru Kubo

    PLANT CELL   Vol. 23 ( 8 ) page: 2924 - 38   2011.8

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    During regeneration, differentiated plant cells can be reprogrammed to produce stem cells, a process that requires coordination of cell cycle reactivation with acquisition of other cellular characteristics. However, the factors that coordinate the two functions during reprogramming have not been determined. Here, we report a link between cell cycle reactivation and the acquisition of new cell-type characteristics through the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase A (CDKA) during reprogramming in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Excised gametophore leaf cells of P. patens are readily reprogrammed, initiate tip growth, and form chloronema apical cells with stem cell characteristics at their first cell division. We found that leaf cells facing the cut undergo CDK activation along with induction of a D-type cyclin, tip growth, and transcriptional activation of protonema-specific genes. A DNA synthesis inhibitor, aphidicolin, inhibited cell cycle progression but prevented neither tip growth nor protonemal gene expression, indicating that cell cycle progression is not required for acquisition of protonema cell-type characteristics. By contrast, treatment with a CDK inhibitor or induction of dominant-negative CDKA;1 protein inhibited not only cell cycle progression but also tip growth and protonemal gene expression. These findings indicate that cell cycle progression is coordinated with other cellular changes by the concomitant regulation through CDKA;1.

    DOI: 10.1105/tpc.111.088005

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  58. The Selaginella Genome Identifies Genetic Changes Associated with the Evolution of Vascular Plants Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Jo Ann Banks, Tomoaki Nishiyama, Mitsuyasu Hasebe, John L. Bowman, Michael Gribskov, Claude dePamphilis, Victor A. Albert, Naoki Aono, Tsuyoshi Aoyama, Barbara A. Ambrose, Neil W. Ashton, Michael J. Axtell, Elizabeth Barker, Michael S. Barker, Jeffrey L. Bennetzen, Nicholas D. Bonawitz, Clint Chapple, Chaoyang Cheng, Luiz Gustavo Guedes Correa, Michael Dacre, Jeremy DeBarry, Ingo Dreyer, Marek Elias, Eric M. Engstrom, Mark Estelle, Liang Feng, Cedric Finet, Sandra K. Floyd, Wolf B. Frommer, Tomomichi Fujita, Lydia Gramzow, Michael Gutensohn, Jesper Harholt, Mitsuru Hattori, Alexander Heyl, Tadayoshi Hirai, Yuji Hiwatashi, Masaki Ishikawa, Mineko Iwata, Kenneth G. Karol, Barbara Koehler, Uener Kolukisaoglu, Minoru Kubo, Tetsuya Kurata, Sylvie Lalonde, Kejie Li, Ying Li, Amy Litt, Eric Lyons, Gerard Manning, Takeshi Maruyama, Todd P. Michael, Koji Mikami, Saori Miyazaki, Shin-ichi Morinaga, Takashi Murata, Bernd Mueller-Roeber, David R. Nelson, Mari Obara, Yasuko Oguri, Richard G. Olmstead, Naoko Onodera, Bent Larsen Petersen, Birgit Pils, Michael Prigge, Stefan A. Rensing, Diego Mauricio Riano-Pachon, Alison W. Roberts, Yoshikatsu Sato, Henrik Vibe Scheller, Burkhard Schulz, Christian Schulz, Eugene V. Shakirov, Nakako Shibagaki, Naoki Shinohara, Dorothy E. Shippen, Iben Sorensen, Ryo Sotooka, Nagisa Sugimoto, Mamoru Sugita, Naomi Sumikawa, Milos Tanurdzic, Guenter Theissen, Peter Ulvskov, Sachiko Wakazuki, Jing-Ke Weng, William W. G. T. Willats, Daniel Wipf, Paul G. Wolf, Lixing Yang, Andreas D. Zimmer, Qihui Zhu, Therese Mitros, Uffe Hellsten, Dominique Loque, Robert Otillar, Asaf Salamov, Jeremy Schmutz, Harris Shapiro, Erika Lindquist, Susan Lucas, Daniel Rokhsar, Igor V. Grigoriev

    SCIENCE   Vol. 332 ( 6032 ) page: 960 - 3   2011.5

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    Vascular plants appeared similar to 410 million years ago, then diverged into several lineages of which only two survive: the euphyllophytes (ferns and seed plants) and the lycophytes. We report here the genome sequence of the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii (Selaginella), the first nonseed vascular plant genome reported. By comparing gene content in evolutionarily diverse taxa, we found that the transition from a gametophyte- to a sporophyte-dominated life cycle required far fewer new genes than the transition from a nonseed vascular to a flowering plant, whereas secondary metabolic genes expanded extensively and in parallel in the lycophyte and angiosperm lineages. Selaginella differs in posttranscriptional gene regulation, including small RNA regulation of repetitive elements, an absence of the trans-acting small interfering RNA pathway, and extensive RNA editing of organellar genes.

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  59. Chloroplast actin filaments organize meshwork on the photorelocated chloroplasts in the moss Physcomitrella patens Reviewed International journal

    Hiroko Yamashita, Yoshikatsu Sato, Takeshi Kanegae, Takatoshi Kagawa, Masamitsu Wada, Akeo Kadota

    PLANTA   Vol. 233 ( 2 ) page: 357 - 68   2011.2

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    Cytoskeleton dynamics during phototropin-dependent chloroplast photorelocation movement was analyzed in protonemal cells of actin- and microtubule-visualized lines of Physcomitrella patens expressing GFP- or tdTomato-talin and GFP-tubulin. Using newly developed epi- and trans-microbeam irradiation systems that permit fluorescence observation of the cell under blue microbeam irradiation inducing chloroplast relocation, it was revealed that meshwork of actin filaments formed at the chloroplast-accumulating area both in the avoidance and accumulation movements. The structure disappeared soon when blue microbeam was turned off, and it was not induced under red microbeam irradiation that did not evoke chloroplast relocation movement. In contrast, no apparent change in microtubule organization was detected during the movements. The actin meshwork was composed of short actin filaments distinct from the cytoplasmic long actin cables and was present between the chloroplasts and plasma membrane. The short actin filaments emerged from around the chloroplast periphery towards the center of chloroplast. Showing highly dynamic behavior, the chloroplast actin filaments (cp-actin filaments) were rapidly organized into meshwork on the chloroplast surface facing plasma membrane. The actin filament configuration on a chloroplast led to the formation of actin meshwork area in the cell as the chloroplasts arrived at and occupied the area. After establishment of the meshwork, cp-actin filaments were still highly dynamic, showing appearance, disappearance, severing and bundling of filaments. These results indicate that the cp-actin filaments have significant roles in the chloroplast movement and positioning in the cell.

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  60. Microtubules Regulate Dynamic Organization of Vacuoles in Physcomitrella patens Reviewed International journal

    Yoshihisa Oda, Aiko Hirata, Toshio Sano, Tomomichi Fujita, Yuji Hiwatashi, Yoshikatsu Sato, Akeo Kadota, Mitsuyasu Hasebe, Seiichiro Hasezawa

    PLANT AND CELL PHYSIOLOGY   Vol. 50 ( 4 ) page: 855 - 68   2009.4

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    Eukaryotic cells have developed several essential membrane components. In flowering plants, appropriate structures and distributions of the major membrane components are predominantly regulated by actin microfilaments. In this study, we have focused on the regulatory mechanism of vacuolar structures in the moss, Physcomitrella patens. The high ability of P. patens to undergo homologous recombination enabled us stably to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP) fusion proteins, and the simple body structure of P. patens enabled us to perform detailed visualization of the intracellular vacuolar and cytoskeletal structures. Three-dimensional analysis and high-speed time-lapse observations revealed surprisingly complex structures and dynamics of the vacuole, with inner sheets and tubular protrusions, and frequent rearrangements by separation and fusion of the membranes. Depolymerization of microtubules dramatically affected these structures and movements. Dual observation of microtubules and vacuolar membranes revealed that microtubules induced tubular protrusions and cytoplasmic strands of the vacuoles, indicative of interactions between microtubules and vacuolar membranes. These results demonstrate a novel function of microtubules in maintaining the distribution of the vacuole and suggest a functional divergence of cytoskeletal functions in land plant evolution.

    DOI: 10.1093/pcp/pcp031

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  61. Kinesins Are Indispensable for Interdigitation of Phragmoplast Microtubules in the Moss Physcomitrella patens Reviewed International journal

    Yuji Hiwatashi, Mari Obara, Yoshikatsu Sato, Tomomichi Fujita, Takashi Murata, Mitsuyasu Hasebe

    PLANT CELL   Vol. 20 ( 11 ) page: 3094 - 106   2008.11

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    Microtubules form arrays with parallel and antiparallel bundles and function in various cellular processes, including subcellular transport and cell division. The antiparallel bundles in phragmoplasts, plant-unique microtubule arrays, are mostly unexplored and potentially offer new cellular insights. Here, we report that the Physcomitrella patens kinesins KINID1a and KINID1b (for kinesin for interdigitated microtubules 1a and 1b), which are specific to land plants and orthologous to Arabidopsis thaliana PAKRP2, are novel factors indispensable for the generation of interdigitated antiparallel microtubules in the phragmoplasts of the moss P. patens. KINID1a and KINID1b are predominantly localized to the putative interdigitated parts of antiparallel microtubules. This interdigitation disappeared in double-deletion mutants of both genes, indicating that both KINID1a and 1b are indispensable for interdigitation of the antiparallel microtubule array. Furthermore, cell plates formed by these phragmoplasts did not reach the plasma membrane in; 20% of the mutant cells examined. We observed that in the double-deletion mutant lines, chloroplasts remained between the plasma membrane and the expanding margins of the cell plate, while chloroplasts were absent from the margins of the cell plates in the wild type. This suggests that the kinesins, the antiparallel microtubule bundles with interdigitation, or both are necessary for proper progression of cell wall expansion.

    DOI: 10.1105/tpc.108.061705

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  62. Microtubule dependent regulation of vacuolar morphogenesis in the moss, Physcomitrella patens Reviewed International journal

    Yoshihisa Oda, Toshio Sano, Tomomichi Fujita, Yuji Hiwatashi, Yoshikatsu Sato, Natsumaro Kutsuna, Aiko Hirata, Mitsuyasu Hasebe, Seiichiro Hasezawa

    PLANT AND CELL PHYSIOLOGY   Vol. 48   page: S24 - S24   2007

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    DOI: 10.14841/jspp.2007.0.031.0

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  63. Genome-wide comparison of developmental genes in land plants International journal

    Mitsuyasu Hasebe, Tomoaki Nishiyama, Takako Tanahashi, Naoki Aono, Tsuyoshi Aoyama, Chaoyang Cheng, Tomomichi Fujita, Kaoru Hashimoto, Tadayoshi Hirai, Yuji Hiwatashi, Masaki Ishikawa, Mineko Iwata, Minoru Kubo, Tetsuya Kurata, Koij Mikami, Saori Miyazaki, Shin-Ichi Morinaga, Takashi Murata, Mari Obara, Yasuko Oguri, Naoko Onodera, Yoshikatsu Sato, Naomi Sumikawa, Naoki Shinohara, Sachiko Wakaduki, Nagisa Sugimoto

    PLANT AND CELL PHYSIOLOGY   Vol. 48   page: S50 - S50   2007

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  64. Identification of proteins which accumulated preferentially in stem cells of Physcomitrella patens International journal

    Tomomichi Fujita, Kaoru Hashimoto, Yuji Hiwatashi, Yoshikatsu Sato, Takashi Murata, Mitsuyasu Hasebe

    PLANT AND CELL PHYSIOLOGY   Vol. 48   page: S50 - S50   2007

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    DOI: 10.14841/jspp.2007.0.136.0

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  65. Phototropins mediate blue and red light-induced chloroplast movements in Physcomitrella patens Reviewed International journal

    M Kasahara, T Kagawa, Y Sato, T Kiyosue, M Wada

    PLANT PHYSIOLOGY   Vol. 135 ( 3 ) page: 1388 - 97   2004.7

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    Phototropin is the blue-light receptor that mediates phototropism, chloroplast movement, and stomatal opening in Arabidopsis. Blue and red light induce chloroplast movement in the moss Physcomitrella patens. To study the photoreceptors for chloroplast movement in P. patens, four phototropin genes (PHOTA1, PHOTA2, PHOTB1, and PHOTB2) were isolated by screening cDNA libraries. These genes were classified into two groups (PHOTA and PHOTB) on the basis of their deduced amino acid sequences. Then phototropin disruptants were generated by homologous recombination and used for analysis of chloroplast movement. Data revealed that blue light-induced chloroplast movement was mediated by phototropins in P. patens. Both photA and photB groups were able to mediate chloroplast avoidance, as has been reported for Arabidopsis phot2, although the photA group contributed more to the response. Red light-induced chloroplast movement was also significantly reduced in photA2photB1photB2 triple disruptants. Because the primary photoreceptor for red light-induced chloroplast movement in P. patens is phytochrome, phototropins may be downstream components of phytochromes in the signaling pathway. To our knowledge, this work is the first to show a function for the phototropin blue-tight receptor in a response to wavelengths that it does not absorb.

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  66. Accumulation response of chloroplasts induced by mechanical stimulation in bryophyte cells Reviewed International journal

    Y Sato, M Wada, A Kadota

    PLANTA   Vol. 216 ( 5 ) page: 772 - 7   2003.3

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:SPRINGER-VERLAG  

    Chloroplast movement has been studied in many plants but mainly as a model system for light signaling. However, we recently showed that the avoidance response of chloroplasts is also induced by mechanical stimulation in fern protonemal cells. Here we report the discovery of a mechanically induced accumulation response of chloroplasts in bryophytes. When mechanical stimulation was directly applied with a capillary to a part of a cell, chloroplasts moved towards and accumulated at the pressed site within 30 min after the onset of stimulation in all species tested. The accumulation movement of chloroplasts was inhibited by Cremart but not by cytochalasin B in red-light-grown protonemata of Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) B., S. & G. To determine the contribution of external Ca2+ to the response, we examined the effects on the accumulation movement of gadolinium (Ga3+), an inhibitor of stretch-activated ion channels, and lanthanum (La3+), a potent inhibitor of calcium channels. Mechano-relocation of chloroplasts was abolished by these drugs, but no effects were observed on photo-relocation of chloroplasts, irrespective of light colors and intensity. These results suggest that influx of external Ca2+ through the plasma membrane is essential for the early steps in signaling of mechano-relocation of chloroplasts whose motility system is dependent on microtubules.

    DOI: 10.1007/s00425-002-0927-x

    Web of Science

    PubMed

  67. Responses of ferns to red light are mediated by an unconventional photoreceptor Reviewed International journal

    H Kawai, T Kanegae, S Christensen, T Kiyosue, Y Sato, T Imaizumi, A Kadota, M Wada

    NATURE   Vol. 421 ( 6920 ) page: 287 - 90   2003.1

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    Efficient photosynthesis is essential for plant survival. To optimize photosynthesis, plants have developed several photo-responses. Stems bend towards a light source (phototropism), chloroplasts move to a place of appropriate light intensity (chloroplast photorelocation) and stomata open to absorb carbon dioxide. These responses are mediated by the blue-light receptors phototropin 1 (phot1) and phototropin 2 (phot2) in Arabidopsis (refs 1-5). In some ferns, phototropism and chloroplast photorelocation are controlled by red light as well as blue light(6). However, until now, the photoreceptor mediating these red-light responses has not been identified. The fern Adiantum capillus-veneris has an unconventional photoreceptor, phytochrome 3 (phy3), which is a chimaera of the red/far-red light receptor phytochrome and phototropin(7). We identify here a function of phy3 for red-light-induced phototropism and for red-light-induced chloroplast photorelocation, by using mutational analysis and complementation. Because phy3 greatly enhances the sensitivity to white light in orienting leaves and chloroplasts, and PHY3 homologues exist among various fern species, this chimaeric photoreceptor may have had a central role in the divergence and proliferation of fern species under low-light canopy conditions.

    DOI: 10.1038/nature01310

    Web of Science

    PubMed

  68. Intracellular chloroplast photorelocation in the moss Physcomitrella patens is mediated by phytochrome as well as by a blue-light receptor Reviewed International journal

    A Kadota, Y Sato, M Wada

    PLANTA   Vol. 210 ( 6 ) page: 932 - 937   2000.5

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    The light-induced intracellular relocation of chloroplasts was examined in red-light-grown protonemal cells of the moss Physcomitrella patens. When irradiated with polarized red or blue light, chloroplast distribution in the cell depended upon the direction of the electrical vector (E-vector) in both light qualities. When the E-vector was parallel to the cross-wall (i.e. perpendicular to the protonemal axis), chloroplasts accumulated along the cross-wall; however, no accumulation along the cross-wall was observed when the vector was perpendicular to it (i.e. parallel to the protonemal axis). When a part of the cell was irradiated with a microbeam of red or blue light, chloroplasts accumulated at or avoided the illumination point depending on the fluence rate used. Red light of 0.1-18 W m(-2) and blue light of 0.01-85.5 W m(-2) induced an accumulation response (low-fluence-rate response; LFR), while an avoidance response thigh-fluence-rate response; HFR) was induced by red light of 60 W m(-2) or higher and by blue light of 285 W m(-2). The red-light-induced LFR and HFR were nullified by a simultaneous background irradiation of far-red light, whereas the blue-light-induced LFR and HFR were not affected at all by this treatment. These results show, for the first time, that dichroic phytochrome, as well as the dichroic blue-light receptor, is involved in the chloroplast relocation movement in these bryophyte cells. Further, the phytochrome-mediated responses but not the blue-light responses were revealed to be lost when red-light-grown cells were cultured under white light for 2 d.

    DOI: 10.1007/s004250050700

    Web of Science

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Books 6

  1. 植物の蛍光イメージング

    佐藤 良勝( Role: Sole author ,  植物の蛍光イメージング)

    生細胞多様性解明に資する光技術ー見て、動かす 「生体の科学」第68巻5号 420-421 医学書院  2017.10 

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    Responsible for pages:420-421   Language:Japanese Book type:Textbook, survey, introduction

  2. アクチン繊維

    佐藤 良勝( Role: Sole author)

    植物の細胞を観る実験プロトコール 202-205 監修:福田 裕穂、西村 幹夫、中野 明彦 秀潤社  2006.4 

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    Language:Japanese Book type:Textbook, survey, introduction

  3. ヒメツリガネゴケの葉緑体光定位運動

    佐藤 良勝, 門田 明雄( Role: Joint author)

    植物の光センシング 監修:和田 正三、徳富 哲、長谷 あきら、長谷部 光泰 156-160 秀潤社  2001.10 

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    Language:Japanese Book type:Scholarly book

  4. Effects of light on the life cycle of pteridophytes and bryophytes

    SATO Yoshikatsu( Role: Sole author)

    2016.2 

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    Language:Japanese Book type:Dictionary, encyclopedia

  5. 発生遺伝子の進化

    長谷部 光泰, 藤田 知道, 倉田 哲也, 佐藤 良勝, 久保 稔, 村田 隆, 青山 剛士, 三上 浩司, 石川 雅樹, 日渡 祐二, 青野 直樹, 篠原 直貴, 西山 智明, 棚橋 貴子( Role: Joint author)

    発生遺伝子の進化 監修:清水 健太郎、長谷部 光泰 植物の進化 163-173 秀潤社  2007.4 

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    Language:Japanese Book type:Textbook, survey, introduction

  6. Chloroplasts movements in response to environmental signals

    Sato Y, Kadota A( Role: Joint author)

    The Structure and Function of Plastids, Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration eds. Wise RR and Hoober K. 527-537 Springer  2006  ( ISBN:9781402040610

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    Total pages:578   Responsible for pages:527-537   Language:English Book type:Scholarly book

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MISC 49

  1. Chemistry, latest agricultural biofluorescence molecules group developed by a biological fusion study

    Masayasu Taki, Yoshikatsu Sato

      Vol. 3   page: 8 - 12   2019.2

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  2. Plant plasticity through the narrow gate

    佐藤良勝

    日本植物生理学会年会(Web)   Vol. 62nd   2021

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  3. Analyses of aberrant embryo development observed in the Arabidopsis mutant defective in the nuclear fusion during reproduction

    西川周一, 高木祐理, 佐藤譲, 栗原大輔, 栗原大輔, 佐藤良勝, 東山哲也, 東山哲也, 東山哲也, 丸山大輔

    日本植物生理学会年会(Web)   Vol. 62nd   2021

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  4. Plasticity in filamentous fungi analysed by microfluidic devices

    福田紗弓, 柳沢直樹, 高谷直樹, 佐藤良勝, 竹下典男

    日本農芸化学会大会講演要旨集(Web)   Vol. 2020   2020

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  5. DIYで顕微鏡を拡張しよう!植物の赤外線観察とマイクロビーム照射装置の作製 Invited

    実験医学   Vol. 37 ( 18 ) page: 3113‐3116   2019.11

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    Authorship:Lead author, Last author, Corresponding author   Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Article, review, commentary, editorial, etc. (scientific journal)  

    J-GLOBAL

  6. Cytoskeletal regulation of the plant tip growth explored by the live-imaging technique

    Sahoko Otsuka, Yoshikatsu Sato, Yuji Hiwatashi

      Vol. 3   page: 81 - 85   2019.2

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  7. イネのニコチアナミン排出型トランスポーターENA1の植物における機能の解析

    野副朋子, 野副朋子, VON WIREN Nicolaus, 佐藤良勝, 東山哲也, 中西啓仁, 西澤直子, 西澤直子

    日本土壌肥料学会講演要旨集(Web)   Vol. 65   2019

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  8. ヒメツリガネゴケにおいて幹細胞化の抑制と茎葉体・造精器・造卵器の形成に寄与する転写因子SBPの機能解析

    壁谷幸子, 越水静, 樋口洋平, 程朝陽, 程朝陽, 佐藤良勝, 玉田洋介, 玉田洋介, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 83rd   2019

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  9. シロイヌナズナ新規核膜融合因子Gex1の細胞内動態の解析

    鈴木千晴, 矢部あやか, 栗原大輔, 栗原大輔, 佐藤良勝, 東山哲也, 東山哲也, 東山哲也, 西川周一

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 83rd   2019

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  10. マイクロ流体デバイスを用いた糸状菌の菌糸における可塑性の解析

    福田紗弓, 柳沢直樹, 高谷直樹, 佐藤良勝, 竹下典男

    日本農芸化学会関東支部講演要旨集(CD-ROM)   Vol. 2019 ( Sept )   2019

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  11. 1細胞遺伝子発現解析を用いたヒメツリガネゴケ葉細胞におけるリプログラミング分子機構の解明

    新井亨, 佐野亮輔, 玉田洋介, 西山智明, 佐藤良勝, 出村拓, 長谷部光泰, 久保稔

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 82nd   2018

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  12. イネの花成初期メリステムをライブイメージングでみる

    藤田尚子, 藤田亜希子, 今井順宙, 佐藤萌子, 佐藤良勝, 東山哲也, 東山哲也, 辻寛之

    Plant Morphology   Vol. 30 ( 1 )   2018

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  13. ヒメツリガネゴケの先端成長における細胞骨格制御

    日渡祐二, 佐藤良勝

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 82nd   2018

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  14. ホスファフルオレセイン骨格を利用した深赤色蛍光カルシウムプローブの開発

    小笠原宏亮, 多喜正泰, 佐藤良勝, 山口茂弘

    有機合成シンポジウム講演要旨集   Vol. 113th   2018

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  15. アクチン繊維微小管同時可視化によるヒメツリガケゴケ先端成長の細胞骨格動態

    大塚沙穂子, 川村安美, 後藤史奈, 佐藤良勝, 日渡祐二, 日渡祐二

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 81st   2017

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  16. バイオイメージング展開を見据えた有機小分子の概念実証の場として機能するITbMライブイメージングセンター

    佐藤良勝

    日本細胞生物学会大会(Web)   Vol. 69th   2017

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  17. トレニア茎断片培養系における表皮起源不定芽形成の初期過程の解析

    森中初音, 間宮章仁, 岩元明敏, 玉置裕章, 鈴木孝征, 佐藤良勝, 池内桃子, 岩瀬哲, 杉本慶子, 東山哲也, 東山哲也, 杉山宗隆

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 81st   2017

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  18. シロイヌナズナ受精卵の極性化動態

    木全祐資, 栗原大輔, 栗原大輔, 栗原大輔, 桧垣匠, 河島友和, 佐藤良勝, 山田朋美, BERGER Frederic, 馳澤盛一郎, 東山哲也, 東山哲也, 東山哲也, 植田美那子, 植田美那子

    Plant Morphology   Vol. 29 ( 1 )   2017

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  19. 二光子励起イメージング技術を駆使したシストセンチュウが誘導する合胞体形成過程の観察

    大津美奈, 栗原大輔, 栗原大輔, 佐藤良勝, 丸山大輔, 東山哲也, 東山哲也, 東山哲也

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 80th   page: 237   2016.9

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    J-GLOBAL

  20. チオフェンジオキシド骨格を基盤とする脂肪染色蛍光プローブの開発

    山口恵理子, WANG Chenguang, 伊藤優介, 佐藤良勝, 多喜正泰, 東山哲也, 山口茂弘

    日本化学会春季年会講演予稿集(CD-ROM)   Vol. 96th   2016

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  21. ストリゴラクトン受容の可視化蛍光プローブ

    吉村柾彦, 土屋雄一朗, 佐藤良勝, 佐藤綾人, 桑田啓子, 伊丹健一郎, 伊丹健一郎, 伊丹健一郎, 木下俊則, 木下俊則, 萩原伸也, 萩原伸也

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 80th   2016

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  22. コケ植物ヒメツリガネゴケのリプログラミング過程において幹細胞化能を獲得した細胞は隣接細胞の幹細胞化を抑制する

    佐藤良勝

    日本細胞生物学会大会(Web)   Vol. 68th   2016

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  23. ヒメツリガネゴケ幹細胞化における光シグナルと傷害シグナルを繋ぐ転写因子の発見

    壁谷幸子, 樋口洋平, 樋口洋平, 佐藤良勝, 佐藤良勝, 程朝陽, 玉田洋介, 玉田洋介, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 80th   2016

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  24. ベンゾホスホールP-オキシドを鍵骨格とする超耐光性蛍光色素の開発と超解像蛍光イメージングへの応用

    深澤愛子, WANG Chenguang, 田邉誼之, 多喜正泰, 佐藤良勝, 東山哲也, 東山哲也, 山口茂弘, 山口茂弘

    基礎有機化学討論会要旨集   Vol. 27th   2016

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  25. イネの茎頂メリステムにおけるオーキシン情報伝達のシグナリング

    IMAI YASUMICHI, SATO YOSHIKATSU, HIGASHIYAMA TETSUYA, SHIMAMOTO KO, TSUJI HIROYUKI

    育種学研究   Vol. 17   page: 222   2015.3

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    J-GLOBAL

  26. タバコ属を用いた異科接木への挑戦

    野田口理孝, 野田口理孝, 佐藤良勝, 東山哲也, 東山哲也, 東山哲也

    育種学研究   Vol. 17   2015

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  27. タバコ属を用いた異科接木の研究

    野田口理孝, 野田口理孝, 佐藤良勝, 東山哲也, 東山哲也, 東山哲也

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 79th   2015

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  28. タバコ属を用いた異科接木の挑戦

    野田口理孝, 野田口理孝, 佐藤良勝, 東山哲也, 東山哲也, 東山哲也

    日本植物生理学会年会要旨集   Vol. 56th   2015

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  29. タバコ属を用いた異科接木の挑戦

    野田口理孝, 野田口理孝, 佐藤良勝, 東山哲也, 東山哲也, 東山哲也

    園芸学研究 別冊   Vol. 14 ( 1 )   2015

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  30. カラマツ心材成分の堆積に関する組織化学的研究

    河西優衣, 佐藤良勝, 半智史, 中田了五, 今井貴規

    日本木材学会大会研究発表要旨集(完全版)(CD-ROM)   Vol. 65th   2015

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  31. GFPチューブリン形質転換ラインを用いたヒメツリガネゴケの原糸体と茎葉体における微小管動態の研究

    矢部智幸, 武智克彰, 滝尾進, 滝尾進, 塚谷裕一, 佐藤良勝, 高野博嘉, 高野博嘉

    Plant Morphology   Vol. 27 ( 1 )   2015

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  32. ヒメツリガネゴケ光応答性転写因子の幹細胞化過程における機能解析

    壁谷幸子, 樋口洋平, 樋口洋平, 佐藤良勝, 佐藤良勝, 程朝陽, 玉田洋介, 玉田洋介, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰

    日本生化学会大会(Web)   Vol. 88th   2015

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  33. ベンゾホスホールP-オキシドを鍵骨格とする高耐光性蛍光色素の開発と超解像蛍光イメージングへの応用

    深澤愛子, WANG Chenguang, 山口恵理子, 田邉誼之, 多喜正泰, 佐藤良勝, 東山哲也, 東山哲也, 山口茂弘, 山口茂弘

    有機典型元素化学討論会講演要旨集   Vol. 42nd   2015

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  34. ヒメツリガネゴケの4つのANGUSTIFOLIA遺伝子は全て茎葉体の茎の細胞の縦幅の伸長に関わる

    矢部智幸, 武智克彰, 滝尾進, 滝尾進, 塚谷裕一, 佐藤良勝, 高野博嘉, 高野博嘉

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 78th   2014

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  35. ヒメツリガネゴケ幹細胞化における傷害シグナルと光シグナルを結節する転写因子PpSBP遺伝子の解析

    壁谷幸子, 樋口洋平, 樋口洋平, 佐藤良勝, 佐藤良勝, 程朝陽, 程朝陽, 玉田洋介, 玉田洋介, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 78th   2014

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  36. ヒストン修飾系の下流で幹細胞化を制御するヒメツリガネゴケ光応答性転写因子の解析

    壁谷幸子, 樋口洋平, 樋口洋平, 佐藤良勝, 佐藤良勝, 程朝陽, 程朝陽, 玉田洋介, 玉田洋介, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰

    日本分子生物学会年会プログラム・要旨集(Web)   Vol. 36th   2013

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  37. ヒメツリガネゴケのリプログラミングを制御するPpSBP遺伝子の機能解析

    壁谷幸子, 樋口洋平, 樋口洋平, 佐藤良勝, 程朝陽, 程朝陽, 玉田洋介, 玉田洋介, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 77th   2013

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  38. ヒメツリガネゴケのAP2/ERF型転写因子は葉細胞での幹細胞化を誘導する

    石川雅樹, 石川雅樹, 石川雅樹, 市川俊輔, 石川貴章, 石川貴章, 樋口洋平, 佐藤良勝, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 76th   2012

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  39. ヒメツリガネゴケ葉細胞のリプログラミングに関わるオーキシン応答因子PpARF11

    永島明知, 杉浦初美, 大島真澄, 西山智明, 西山智明, 佐藤良勝, 久保稔, 日渡裕二, 日渡裕二, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 倉田哲也

    日本植物生理学会年会要旨集   Vol. 52nd   2011

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  40. ヒメツリガネゴケにおけるリプログラミング過程の側方抑制による制御

    佐藤良勝, 杉本渚, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰

    日本植物生理学会年会要旨集   Vol. 51st   2010

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  41. ヒメツリガネゴケ原糸体を用いた細胞レベルでの原形質連絡制御の解析

    北川宗典, 松崎潤, 佐藤良勝, 藤田知道

    日本植物生理学会年会要旨集   Vol. 51st   2010

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  42. ヒメツリガネゴケ葉細胞のリプログラミングに関わるオーキシン応答因子ARF

    永島明知, 杉浦初美, 若月幸子, 大島真澄, THOMPSON Kari, 大場久美子, 西山智明, 西山智明, 榊原恵子, 日渡祐二, 日渡祐二, 小栗康子, 久保稔, 佐藤良勝, 林謙一郎, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 倉田哲也

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 74th   2010

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  43. SOLiDシステムを用いたマルチプレックスシーケンス

    樋口洋平, 西山智明, 西山智明, 大島真澄, 小野崎登喜郎, 佐藤良勝, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 倉田哲也

    日本分子生物学会年会講演要旨集   Vol. 32nd ( Vol.1 )   2009

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  44. ヒメツリガネゴケにおいて不等分裂制御への関与が推測されるGRASファミリー転写因子の機能解析

    一力綾子, 丸山剛史, 今井章裕, 橋本薫, 日渡祐二, 日渡祐二, 佐藤良勝, 宮脇香織, 村田隆, 村田隆, 三上浩司, 倉田哲也, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 藤田知道

    日本分子生物学会年会講演要旨集   Vol. 32nd ( Vol.3 )   2009

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  45. ヒメツリガネゴケSBP-box遺伝子は葉細胞の幹細胞化を抑制する

    樋口洋平, 大場久美子, 馬渡未来, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 佐藤良勝

    日本植物生理学会年会要旨集   Vol. 50th   2009

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  46. ヒメツリガネゴケの逆遺伝学的解析のための分子ツール

    久保稔, 小栗康子, 小原真理, 秋田朝日, 今井章裕, 石川雅樹, 日渡祐二, 日渡祐二, 西山智明, 西山智明, 倉田哲也, 佐藤良勝, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰

    日本植物生理学会年会要旨集   Vol. 50th   2009

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  47. 不等分裂モデルであるヒメツリガネゴケ頂端幹細胞に局在するタンパク質群の同定および機能解析

    丸山剛史, 橋本薫, 日渡祐二, 日渡祐二, 佐藤良勝, 久保稔, 小田祥久, 佐野俊夫, 馳澤盛一郎, 村田隆, 村田隆, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 藤田知道

    日本植物生理学会年会要旨集   Vol. 50th   2009

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  48. ヒメツリガネゴケにおける不等分裂に関わる因子の相互作用

    一力綾子, 丸山剛史, 橋本薫, 日渡祐二, 日渡祐二, 佐藤良勝, 村田隆, 村田隆, 三上浩司, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 藤田知道

    日本植物学会大会研究発表記録   Vol. 72nd   2008

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  49. ヒメツリガネゴケ頂端幹細胞に局在するタンパク質の不等分裂時における動態解析

    丸山剛史, 橋本薫, 日渡祐二, 日渡祐二, 佐藤良勝, 村田隆, 村田隆, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 長谷部光泰, 藤田知道

    日本植物生理学会年会要旨集   Vol. 49th   2008

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Presentations 30

  1. Stem cells suppress stem cell formation of the neighboring cells during the reprogramming process in the moss Physcomitrella patens Invited International conference

    Yoshikatsu Sato

    International Symposium on “Nnobiotechnology meets Holonic Communication”  2012.3.23 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  2. New fluorescent dyes for labeling nucleic acid and plant cell wall Invited International conference

    SATO Yoshikatsu

    EMBO Practical Course -Functional Imaging of Plants-  2019.5.24 

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    Language:English   Presentation type:Public lecture, seminar, tutorial, course, or other speech  

  3. Promoting Chemistry-enabled Bioimaging at Nagoya ITbM Live Imaging Center Invited International conference

    Yoshikatsu Sato

    1st PSC Advanced Microscopic Imaging Symposium  2018.8.1 

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    Language:English   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  4. Reprogramming differentiated cells into pluripotent stem cells in the moss Invited International conference

    Yoshikatsu Sato

    International Symposium 2010 -Plasticity in Development and Evolution-  2010.11.11 

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    Language:English   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  5. Scrutinizing chemical fluorescent probes in cells at ITbM Live Imaging Center Invited International conference

    Yoshikatsu Sato

    2016 ITbM-IoC Joint Workshop on Biomolecules and Materials  2016.11.16 

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    Language:English   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  6. コケ植物ヒメツリガネゴケのリプログラミング過程において幹細胞化能を獲得した細胞は隣接細胞の幹細胞化を抑制する Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    第68回日本細胞生物学会大会シンポジウム 植物システムを支える運命の分岐点  2016.6.15 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  7. 植物先端成長細胞の力学的可塑性について Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    日本メカノバイオロジー研究会2019  2019.9.3 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Oral presentation (invited, special)  

  8. 植物オルガネラ運動研究のモデルとしてのヒメツリガネゴケ Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    基生研研究会-新しいモデル生物が拓く生物科学フロンティア  2004.3.1 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  9. Application of super-photostable near Infrared dye for plant imaging Invited

    Yoshikatsu Sato, Masayasu Taki

    2018.9.3 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  10. 接触刺激による葉緑体運動と細胞外カルシウムイオン Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    第8回植物生体膜シンポジウム-ストレス下における膜機能の発現  2005.9.23 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  11. 多検体蛍光タイムラプスイメージングの実際 Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    日本植物学会第75回大会-イメージングおよびその関連技術と植物学  2011.9.18 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  12. 名古屋大学ライブイメージングセンター Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    東山新学術 第一回異分野融合ミーティング  2017.8.22 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Public lecture, seminar, tutorial, course, or other speech  

  13. 化学者と創るトランスフォーマティブティブ蛍光分子 Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    第7回生命科学阿波おどりシンポジウム2017  2017.8.16 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  14. 化学者とともに拓く名大ITbMライブイメージングセンター Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    第6回 蛍光イメージングミニシンポジウム  2017.7.27 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  15. 光刺激、接触刺激により誘導される葉緑体の運動反応と細胞骨格 Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    21世紀COE生命科学若手ワークショップ-植物におけるアクチン系タンパク質の機能発現  2004.1.24 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  16. ヒメツリガネゴケ頂端細胞の細胞骨格 Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    基生研研究会-植物細胞における細胞骨格機能発現:滑り説から50年  2006.12.27 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  17. ヒメツリガネゴケ微小管のダイナミクス Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    基生研研究会-植物の微小管構築機構の新展開  2003.10.18 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  18. ヒメツリガネゴケ幹細胞形成過程の多点タイムラプスイメージング解析 Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    文部科学省科学研究費補助金学術創成研究主催シンポジウム 植物の成長・分化を制御する生理活性ペプチドとmicroRNA -新規分子群と新技術-  2007.11.1 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  19. ITbM Live Imaging Center as a site for proof of concept in chemistry enabled bioimaging Invited

    Yoshikatsu Sato

    The 69th Annual Meeting of the Japan Society for Cell Biology  2017.6.14 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  20. 植物細胞の長時間多点タイムラプスイメージング Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    日本顕微鏡学会第63回学術講演会-植物の中を覗く:ライブイメージングから電顕トモグラフィーまで  2007.5.22 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  21. 高感度検出器を用いた植物細胞骨格のライブイメージング Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    日本顕微鏡学会平成25年度関西支部特別講演会  2013.9.7 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  22. 長時間多点タイムラプスイメーニングによるヒメツリガネゴケ幹細胞化過程の解析 Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    視る生物学2-イメージングの現在と未来  2007.11.21 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  23. 近赤外チャンネルを使ってみませんか Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    第83回日本植物学会 関連集会 「植物イメージングに欠かせない知識と技術」  2019.9.15 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Public lecture, seminar, tutorial, course, or other speech  

  24. 超解像顕微鏡をもちいたタイムゲートイメージング Invited

    佐藤良勝, 杉本渚

    日本植物学会第79回大会シンポジウム  2015.9.6 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  25. 超耐光性近赤外蛍光色素(PREX 710)による細胞壁イメージング

    佐藤良勝, 杉本渚, ガージボウスキーマレク, 山口茂弘, 東山哲也, 多喜正泰

    第83回日本植物学会  2019.9.15 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Oral presentation (general)  

  26. 超耐光性蛍光色素が可能にする先端バイオイメージング Invited

    多喜 正泰, 佐藤 良勝

    生命科学連携推進協議会 成果シンポジウム  2018.6.5 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  27. ITbM Live Imaging Center as a joint use imaging facility for a beginner to a skilled researcher Invited International conference

    Yoshikatsu Sato

    The 1st ABiS Symposium: Towards the Future of Advanced Bioimaging for Life Sciences  2017.2.19 

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    Language:English   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  28. ITbM Live Imaging Center -Practical use of fluorescent dyes from ITbM- International conference

    Yoshikatsu Sato

    2017 IoC-IPMB-ITbM Joint Symposium on New Frontiers by Fusing Chemistry and Biology  2017.7.13 

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    Language:English   Presentation type:Poster presentation  

  29. ヒメツリガネゴケにおける微小管構築 Invited

    佐藤 良勝

    日本植物学会第69回大会-植物微小管構築の分子機構解明への新展開  2005.9.22 

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    Language:Japanese   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

  30. “Through the narrow gate” ―狭さをものともしない植物たちー Invited

    佐藤良勝

    第62回日本植物生理学会年会シンポジウム「伸ばす・曲げる・太る:メカニクスから読み解く植物の成長戦略」  2021.3.16 

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    Language:English   Presentation type:Symposium, workshop panel (nominated)  

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KAKENHI (Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research) 6

  1. 植物ホルモンフローアトラスの構築

    2019.10 - 2025.3

    科学技術振興機構  戦略的想像研究推進事業 

    土屋雄一朗

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    Grant type:Competitive

  2. Analysis of curvaure variation for understanding tip growth and its tropism

    Grant number:20H05412  2020.4 - 2022.3

    Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (Research in a proposed research area)

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\9100000 ( Direct Cost: \7000000 、 Indirect Cost:\2100000 )

  3. Understanding dynamic monocoque structure of tip growing cell maintained by tensegrity

    Grant number:19H05364  2019.4 - 2021.3

    Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (Research in a proposed research area)

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\9100000 ( Direct Cost: \7000000 、 Indirect Cost:\2100000 )

  4. The microtubule-based mechanisms for controlling both cell division and elongation in plants

    Grant number:16K07406  2016.4 - 2019.3

    Hiwatashi Yuji

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    Authorship:Coinvestigator(s) 

    To understand molecular mechanisms for dual roles of microtubule-associated proteins on cell division and elongation, we investigated targeting systems of a microtubule-based motor protein (kinesin), KINID1, to a division apparatus and a tip growth machinery in the moss Physcomitrella patens. The expression analysis of the truncated KINID1 as well as the KINID1 fused with a photo-convertible fluorescent protein suggested that the KINID1 was recruited to the division apparatus, such as spindles and phragmoplasts, in a protein-dependent manner, and moved along the equatorial part of the phragmoplast during its expansion. On the contrary, the KINID1 was possibly targeted to the tip growth machinery in an mRNA-dependent manner. The turnover of the KINID1 was estimated within a few hours in the machinery in contrast to the longer maintenance of the machinery. Moreover, the correct targeting of KINID1 to the machinery is also dependent on both microtubules and actin filaments.

  5. Chemical library screening to identify novel key regulators of organelle distribution in plants

    Grant number:15K14542  2015.4 - 2018.3

    SATO YOSHIKATSU

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\4030000 ( Direct Cost: \3100000 、 Indirect Cost:\930000 )

    Proper distribution of organelles is essential for proper cell function in eukaryotic cells. In this study, we performed chemical library screening to identify novel key regulators of organelle distribution in plants. As a result of high-throughput but careful screening design, we obtained 9 candidates from 20,000 chemicals, which can be divided into 4 groups by structure-activity relationships. We focused 1 of these groups and evaluated by time-lapse analysis. Then, we confirmed 5 candidates having common structures. Furthermore, we succeeded to identify the essential and non-essential part from hit compounds and to synthesize the dimer compound having strong effect on organelle distribution. Therefore, we conclude that we could obtain important tools and information to elucidate the basic mechanism of organelle distribution in plants.

  6. The analysis of interaction between pollen tubes by microchannel devece

    Grant number:25650075  2013.4 - 2014.3

    SATO Yoshikatsu

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\4160000 ( Direct Cost: \3200000 、 Indirect Cost:\960000 )

    Pollen tube guidance is one of the key processes for plant reproduction. Recently, molecular characters have been identified such as attractant molecules. However, it remains to be elucidated that only one of many pollen tubes enters each ovule. The repellent effect by the interaction between pollen tubes is assumed, although not substantiated. We employed nano-technology based on photolithographic approach to make microfluidic devices for cell culture and live imaging. In the result, no apparent interaction between pollen tubes was detected in the microchannel. We need to observe pollen tube behaviors in vivo using two-photon microscopy.

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Teaching Experience (Off-campus) 1

  1. 生体構築論

    Nagoya University)