Updated on 2022/04/12

写真a

 
KAMIKOUCHI Azusa
 
Organization
Graduate School of Science Professor
Graduate School
Graduate School of Science
Undergraduate School
School of Science
Title
Professor
Contact information
メールアドレス

Degree 1

  1. PhD ( 2002.3   The University of Tokyo ) 

Research Interests 7

  1. 聴覚

  2. 脳情報の解読と制御

  3. 神経回路

  4. 包括脳ネットワーク

  5. 感覚情報処理

  6. auditory system, brain, courtship behavior

  7. ショウジョウバエ

Research Areas 2

  1. Life Science / Neuroscience-general

  2. Life Science / Neuroscience-general

Research History 17

  1. Tohoku University   Graduate School of Life Sciences   Professor

    2019.12

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    Country:Japan

  2. Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University   Professor

    2011.9

  3. 名古屋大学大学院理学研究科 教授

    2011.9

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    Country:Japan

  4. JSTさきがけ「脳情報の解読と制御」 研究者

    2010.10

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    Country:Japan

  5. JSTさきがけ「脳情報の解読と制御」   研究者 兼任

    2010.10 - 2014.9

  6. 東京薬科大学 生命科学部 助教

    2008.8 - 2011.8

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    Country:Japan

  7. Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences   School of Life Science   Assistant Professor

    2008.8 - 2011.8

  8. University of Cologne

    2008.4 - 2008.8

  9. 日本学術振興会 特別研究員

    2008.4 - 2008.7

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    Country:Japan

  10. 日本学術振興会 海外特別研究員、ケルン大学

    2006.12 - 2008.7

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    Country:Germany

  11. University of Cologne

    2006.11 - 2008.3

  12. Humboldt Research Fellow, University of Cologne

    2005.8 - 2006.11

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    Country:Germany

  13. University of Cologne

    2005.8 - 2006.10

  14. 東京大学・分子細胞生物学研究所   科学技術振興機構BIRD 研究員

    2003.4 - 2005.7

  15. National Institute for Basic Biology

    2002.4 - 2003.3

  16. 東京大学大学院・理学系研究科   日本学術振興会 特別研究員(DC1)

    1999.4 - 2002.3

  17. 東京大学大学院・薬学系研究科機能薬学専攻   博士課程 修了(薬学博士)

    1999.4 - 2002.3

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Professional Memberships 5

  1. The Japanese Society for Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry

  2. 日本神経科学学会

  3. 日本神経科学学会

  4. THE JAPANESE SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY

  5. 社会性昆虫コンソーシアム

Committee Memberships 7

  1. 文部科学省   科学官  

    2021.4   

  2. JSTさきがけ「生体多感覚システム」   領域アドバイザー  

    2021.4   

  3. 日本学術会議   連携会員  

    2020.10   

  4. 生命創生探求センター運営委員会   運営委員  

    2020.4   

  5. Journal of neurogentics   Editorial board  

    2019.10   

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    Committee type:Academic society

  6. 日本神経科学会   ダイバーシティ委員  

    2016   

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    Committee type:Academic society

  7. NBRPショウジョウバエ運営委員会   運営委員  

    2012   

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    Committee type:Academic society

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Awards 7

  1. Incentive award, Japan Neuroscience Society

    2012.6   Japan Neuroscience Society  

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    Country:Japan

  2. Research Grant [PROGRAM GRANTS]

    2021.4   Human Frontier Science Program Organization   Decoding acoustic communication in mosquitoes: From distortion products to vector control

  3. Research Grant [YOUNG INVESTIGATORS]

    2011.4   Human Frontier Science Program Organization  

  4. The Young Scientists' Prize, The Commendation for Science and Technology by the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology

    2010.4   The Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology  

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    Country:Japan

  5. 若手科学者賞

    2010.4   科学技術分野の文部科学大臣表彰  

    上川内あづさ

  6. The Young Scientists’ Prize

    2010.4   Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology  

    Azusa Kamikouchi

  7. The 4th Daigoro Moriwaki Award

    2007.7  

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    Country:Japan

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Papers 56

  1. Assessing Experience-dependent Tuning of Song Preference inFruit Flies (<i>Drosophila melanogaster</i>).

    Li X, Ishimoto H, Kamikouchi A

    Bio-protocol   Vol. 8 ( 14 ) page: e2932   2018.7

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    PubMed

  2. [Application of Drosophila as an integrative neural model to understand how sound, gravity, and wind information are processed in the brain]. International coauthorship International journal

    Kamikouchi A, Inagaki HK, Yorozu S, Ito K

    Tanpakushitsu kakusan koso. Protein, nucleic acid, enzyme   Vol. 54 ( 14 ) page: 1817 - 26   2009.11

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:14  

    PubMed

  3. The neural basis of Drosophila gravity-sensing and hearing

    Azusa Kamikouchi, Hidehiko K. Inagaki, Thomas Effertz, Oliver Hendrich, Andre Fiala, Martin C. Goepfert, Kei Ito

    NATURE   Vol. 458 ( 7235 ) page: 165 - 71   2009.3

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP  

    The neural substrates that the fruitfly Drosophila uses to sense smell, taste and light share marked structural and functional similarities with ours, providing attractive models to dissect sensory stimulus processing. Here we focus on two of the remaining and less understood prime sensory modalities: graviception and hearing. We show that the fly has implemented both sensory modalities into a single system, Johnston&apos;s organ, which houses specialized clusters of mechanosensory neurons, each of which monitors specific movements of the antenna. Gravity- and sound-sensitive neurons differ in their response characteristics, and only the latter express the candidate mechanotransducer channel NompC. The two neural subsets also differ in their central projections, feeding into neural pathways that are reminiscent of the vestibular and auditory pathways in our brain. By establishing the Drosophila counterparts of these sensory systems, our findings provide the basis for a systematic functional and molecular dissection of how different mechanosensory stimuli are detected and processed.

    DOI: 10.1038/nature07810

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    PubMed

  4. Identification of honeybee antennal proteins/genes expressed in a sex- and/or caste selective manner

    A Kamikouchi, M Morioka, T Kubo

    ZOOLOGICAL SCIENCE   Vol. 21 ( 1 ) page: 53 - 62   2004.1

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:ZOOLOGICAL SOC JAPAN  

    We identified three candidate proteins/genes involved in caste and/or sex-specific olfactory processing in the honeybee Apis mellifera L., that are differentially expressed between the antennae of the worker, queen, and drone honeybees using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or the differential display method. A protein was identified, termed D-AP1, that was expressed preferentially in drone antennae when compared to those of workers. cDNA cloning revealed that D-AP1 is homologous to carboxylesterases. Enzymatic carboxyl esterase activity in the drone antennae was higher than in the workers, suggesting its dominant function in the drone antennae. In contrast, two proteins encoded by genes termed W-AP1 and Amwat were expressed preferentially in worker antennae when compared to those of queens. W-AP1 is homologous to insect chemosensory protein, and Amwat encodes a novel secretory protein. W-AP1 is expressed selectively in worker antennae, while Amwat is expressed both in the antennae and legs of the workers. These findings suggest that these proteins are involved in the antennal function characteristic to drone or worker honeybees.

    DOI: 10.2108/0289-0003(2004)21[53:IOHAGE]2.0.CO;2

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  5. Loss of Fis1 impairs proteostasis during skeletal muscle aging in Drosophila. International journal

    Tai-Ting Lee, Po-Lin Chen, Matthew P Su, Jian-Chiuan Li, Yi-Wen Chang, Rei-Wen Liu, Hsueh-Fen Juan, Jinn-Moon Yang, Shih-Peng Chan, Yu-Chen Tsai, Sophia von Stockum, Elena Ziviani, Azusa Kamikouchi, Horng-Dar Wang, Chun-Hong Chen

    Aging cell   Vol. 20 ( 6 ) page: e13379   2021.6

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    Increased levels of dysfunctional mitochondria within skeletal muscle are correlated with numerous age-related physiopathological conditions. Improving our understanding of the links between mitochondrial function and muscle proteostasis, and the role played by individual genes and regulatory networks, is essential to develop treatments for these conditions. One potential player is the mitochondrial outer membrane protein Fis1, a crucial fission factor heavily involved in mitochondrial dynamics in yeast but with an unknown role in higher-order organisms. By using Drosophila melanogaster as a model, we explored the effect of Fis1 mutations generated by transposon Minos-mediated integration. Mutants exhibited a higher ratio of damaged mitochondria with age as well as elevated reactive oxygen species levels compared with controls. This caused an increase in oxidative stress, resulting in large accumulations of ubiquitinated proteins, accelerated muscle function decline, and mitochondrial myopathies in young mutant flies. Ectopic expression of Fis1 isoforms was sufficient to suppress this phenotype. Loss of Fis1 led to unbalanced mitochondrial proteostasis within fly muscle, decreasing both flight capabilities and lifespan. Fis1 thus clearly plays a role in fly mitochondrial dynamics. Further investigations into the detailed function of Fis1 are necessary for exploring how mitochondrial function correlates with muscle health during aging.

    DOI: 10.1111/acel.13379

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  6. Molecular and neural mechanisms regulating sexual motivation of virgin female Drosophila. Invited Reviewed International journal

    Hiroshi Ishimoto, Azusa Kamikouchi

    Cellular and molecular life sciences : CMLS   Vol. 78 ( 10 ) page: 4805 - 4819   2021.5

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    Authorship:Last author, Corresponding author   Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    During courtship, multiple information sources are integrated in the brain to reach a final decision, i.e., whether or not to mate. The brain functions for this complex behavior can be investigated by genetically manipulating genes and neurons, and performing anatomical, physiological, and behavioral analyses. Drosophila is a powerful model experimental system for such studies, which need to be integrated from molecular and cellular levels to the behavioral level, and has enabled pioneering research to be conducted. In male flies, which exhibit a variety of characteristic sexual behaviors, we have accumulated knowledge of many genes and neural circuits that control sexual behaviors. On the other hand, despite the importance of the mechanisms of mating decision-making in females from an evolutionary perspective (such as sexual selection), research on the mechanisms that control sexual behavior in females has progressed somewhat slower. In this review, we focus on the pre-mating behavior of female Drosophila melanogaster, and introduce previous key findings on the neuronal and molecular mechanisms that integrate sensory information and selective expression of behaviors toward the courting male.

    DOI: 10.1007/s00018-021-03820-y

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  7. Distinct subpopulations of mechanosensory chordotonal organ neurons elicit grooming of the fruit fly antennae. Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Stefanie Hampel, Katharina Eichler, Daichi Yamada, Davi D Bock, Azusa Kamikouchi, Andrew M Seeds

    eLife   Vol. 9   2020.10

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    Diverse mechanosensory neurons detect different mechanical forces that can impact animal behavior. Yet our understanding of the anatomical and physiological diversity of these neurons and the behaviors that they influence is limited. We previously discovered that grooming of the Drosophila melanogaster antennae is elicited by an antennal mechanosensory chordotonal organ, the Johnston's organ (JO) (Hampel et al., 2015). Here, we describe anatomically and physiologically distinct JO mechanosensory neuron subpopulations that each elicit antennal grooming. We show that the subpopulations project to different, discrete zones in the brain and differ in their responses to mechanical stimulation of the antennae. Although activation of each subpopulation elicits antennal grooming, distinct subpopulations also elicit the additional behaviors of wing flapping or backward locomotion. Our results provide a comprehensive description of the diversity of mechanosensory neurons in the JO, and reveal that distinct JO subpopulations can elicit both common and distinct behavioral responses.

    DOI: 10.7554/eLife.59976

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  8. Wiring patterns from auditory sensory neurons to the escape and song-relay pathways in fruit flies. Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Hyunsoo Kim, Mihoko Horigome, Yuki Ishikawa, Feng Li, J Scott Lauritzen, Gwyneth Card, Davi D Bock, Azusa Kamikouchi

    The Journal of Comparative Neurology   Vol. 528 ( 12 ) page: 2068 - 2098   2020.8

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    Many animals rely on acoustic cues to decide what action to take next. Unraveling the wiring patterns of the auditory neural pathways is prerequisite for understanding such information processing. Here we reconstructed the first step of the auditory neural pathway in the fruit fly brain, from primary to secondary auditory neurons, at the resolution of transmission electron microscopy. By tracing axons of two major subgroups of auditory sensory neurons in fruit flies, low-frequency tuned Johnston's organ (JO)-B neurons and high-frequency tuned JO-A neurons, we observed extensive connections from JO-B neurons to the main second-order neurons in both the song-relay and escape pathways. In contrast, JO-A neurons connected strongly to a neuron in the escape pathway. Our findings suggest that heterogeneous JO neuronal populations could be recruited to modify escape behavior whereas only specific JO neurons contribute to courtship behavior. We also found that all JO neurons have postsynaptic sites at their axons. Presynaptic modulation at the output sites of JO neurons could affect information processing of the auditory neural pathway in flies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

    DOI: 10.1002/cne.24877

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  9. A Feedforward Circuit Regulates Action Selection of Pre-mating Courtship Behavior in Female Drosophila. Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Hiroshi Ishimoto, Azusa Kamikouchi

    Current biology : CB   Vol. 30 ( 3 ) page: 396 - +   2020.2

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    In the early phase of courtship, female fruit flies exhibit an acute rejection response to avoid unfavorable mating. This pre-mating rejection response is evolutionarily paralleled across species, but the molecular and neuronal basis of that behavior is unclear. Here, we show that a putative incoherent feedforward circuit comprising ellipsoid body neurons, cholinergic R4d, and its repressor GABAergic R2/R4m neurons regulates the pre-mating rejection response in the virgin female Drosophila melanogaster. Both R4d and R2/R4m are positively regulated, via specific dopamine receptors, by a subset of neurons in the dopaminergic PPM3 cluster. Genetic deprivation of GABAergic signal via GABAA receptor RNA interference in this circuit induces a massive rejection response, whereas activation of GABAergic R2/R4m or suppression of cholinergic R4d increases receptivity. Moreover, glutamatergic signaling via N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors induces NO-mediated retrograde regulation potentially from R4d to R2/R4m, likely providing flexible control of the behavioral switching from rejection to acceptance. Our study elucidates the molecular and neural mechanisms regulating the behavioral selection process of the pre-mating female.

    DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2019.11.065

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  10. Stereotyped Combination of Hearing and Wind/Gravity-Sensing Neurons in the Johnston's Organ of Drosophila. Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Yuki Ishikawa, Mao Fujiwara, Junlin Wong, Akari Ura, Azusa Kamikouchi

    Frontiers in physiology   Vol. 10   page: 1552 - 1552   2020.1

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    The antennal ear of the fruit fly, called the Johnston's organ (JO), detects a wide variety of mechanosensory stimuli, including sound, wind, and gravity. Like many sensory cells in insect, JO neurons are compartmentalized in a sensory unit (i.e., scolopidium). To understand how different subgroups of JO neurons are organized in each scolopidial compartment, we visualized individual JO neurons by labeling various subgroups of JO neurons in different combinations. We found that vibration-sensitive (or deflection-sensitive) neurons rarely grouped together in a single scolopidial compartment. This finding suggests that JO neurons are grouped in stereotypical combinations each with a distinct response property in a scolopidium.

    DOI: 10.3389/fphys.2019.01552

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  11. STEFTR: A Hybrid Versatile Method for State Estimation and Feature Extraction From the Trajectory of Animal Behavior. Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Shuhei J Yamazaki, Kazuya Ohara, Kentaro Ito, Nobuo Kokubun, Takuma Kitanishi, Daisuke Takaichi, Yasufumi Yamada, Yosuke Ikejiri, Fumie Hiramatsu, Kosuke Fujita, Yuki Tanimoto, Akiko Yamazoe-Umemoto, Koichi Hashimoto, Katsufumi Sato, Ken Yoda, Akinori Takahashi, Yuki Ishikawa, Azusa Kamikouchi, Shizuko Hiryu, Takuya Maekawa, Koutarou D Kimura

    Frontiers in neuroscience   Vol. 13   page: 626 - 626   2019.6

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    Animal behavior is the final and integrated output of brain activity. Thus, recording and analyzing behavior is critical to understand the underlying brain function. While recording animal behavior has become easier than ever with the development of compact and inexpensive devices, detailed behavioral data analysis requires sufficient prior knowledge and/or high content data such as video images of animal postures, which makes it difficult for most of the animal behavioral data to be efficiently analyzed. Here, we report a versatile method using a hybrid supervised/unsupervised machine learning approach for behavioral state estimation and feature extraction (STEFTR) only from low-content animal trajectory data. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method, we analyzed trajectory data of worms, fruit flies, rats, and bats in the laboratories, and penguins and flying seabirds in the wild, which were recorded with various methods and span a wide range of spatiotemporal scales-from mm to 1,000 km in space and from sub-seconds to days in time. We successfully estimated several states during behavior and comprehensively extracted characteristic features from a behavioral state and/or a specific experimental condition. Physiological and genetic experiments in worms revealed that the extracted behavioral features reflected specific neural or gene activities. Thus, our method provides a versatile and unbiased way to extract behavioral features from simple trajectory data to understand brain function.

    DOI: 10.3389/fnins.2019.00626

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  12. [The Neural Mechanism for Detecting Song Rhythm]. Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Yamada D, Kamikouchi A

    Brain and nerve = Shinkei kenkyu no shinpo   Vol. 71 ( 6 ) page: 599 - 609   2019.6

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    DOI: 10.11477/mf.1416201322

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  13. A single male auditory response test to quantify auditory behavioral responses in Drosophila melanogaster. Reviewed

    Ishikawa Y, Okamoto N, Yoneyama Y, Maeda N, Kamikouchi A

    Journal of neurogenetics   Vol. 33 ( 2 ) page: 64 - 74   2019.4

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD  

    Many animals utilize auditory signals to communicate with conspecific individuals. During courtship, males of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and related species produce a courtship song comprised of sine and pulse songs by vibrating their wings. The pulse song increases female receptivity and male courtship activity, indicating that it functions as a sexual signal. One song parameter, interpulse interval (IPI), varies among closely related species. In D. melanogaster, a song with a conspecific IPI induces a stronger behavioral response than heterospecific songs, indicating the ability of the flies to discriminate conspecific IPI. Traditionally, the fly's response to the song is measured under grouped conditions, in which the effect of sensory modalities other than audition cannot be excluded. Here, to quantify the individual ability to discriminate a conspecific song, we systematically analyzed the auditory response of single male flies to sound with various parameters. Moreover, we applied this method, termed SMART (Single Male Auditory Response Test), to two sister species for potential application in a comparative approach. By quantifying the locomotor activity of single D. melanogaster males during sound exposure, we detected increased locomotor activity in response to pulse songs, but not to white noise or pure tone. The conspecific song evoked stronger response than the heterospecific songs, and ablation of their antennal receivers severely suppressed the locomotor increase. A pulse song with a small IPI variation evoked a continuous response, while the response to songs with highly variable IPIs tends to be rapidly decayed. This provides the first evidence that fruit flies discriminate IPI variations, which possibly inform the age and social contexts of the singer. Sister species, D. sechellia, exhibited a locomotor response to pulse song, while D. simulans exhibited no behavioral response. This suggests that auditory and other stimuli that elicit this behavioral response are diversified among Drosophila species.

    DOI: 10.1080/01677063.2019.1611805

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  14. Softness sensing and learning in <i>Drosophila</i> larvae. Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Kudow N, Kamikouchi A, Tanimura T

    The Journal of experimental biology   Vol. 222 ( 7 )   2019.4

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    DOI: 10.1242/jeb.196329

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  15. Assessing Experience-dependent Tuning of Song Preference in Fruit Flies (Drosophila melanogaster)

    Li Xiaodong, Ishimoto Hiroshi, Kamikouchi Azusa

    BIO-PROTOCOL   Vol. 8 ( 14 )   2018.7

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    DOI: 10.21769/BioProtoc.2xxx

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  16. Assessing experience-dependent tuning of song preference in fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) Invited Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Xiaodong Li, Hiroshi Ishimoto, Azusa Kamikouchi

    bio-protocol   Vol. 8 ( 14 ) page: e2932   2018.7

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    DOI: 10.21769/BioProtoc.2932

  17. GABAergic local interneurons shape female fruit fly response to mating songs. Reviewed

    Yamada D, Ishimoto H, Li X, Kohashi T, Ishikawa Y, Kamikouchi A

    The Journal of Neuroscience   Vol. 38 ( 18 ) page: 4329 - 4347   2018.5

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:SOC NEUROSCIENCE  

    Many animals use acoustic signals to attract a potential mating partner. In fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), the courtship pulse song has a species-specific interpulse interval (IPI) that activates mating. Although a series of auditory neurons in the fly brain exhibit different tuning patterns to IPIs, it is unclear how the response of each neuron is tuned. Here, we studied the neural circuitry regulating the activity of antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC)-B1 neurons, key secondary auditory neurons in the excitatory neural pathway that relay song information. By performing Ca2+ imaging in female flies, we found that the IPI selectivity observed in AMMC-B1 neurons differs from that of upstream auditory sensory neurons [Johnston's organ (JO)-B]. Selective knock-down of a GABA(A) receptor subunit in AMMC-B1 neurons increased their response to short IPIs, suggesting that GABA suppresses AMMC-B1 activity at these IPIs. Connection mapping identified two GABAergic local interneurons that synapse with AMMC-B1 and JO-B. Ca2(+) imaging combined with neuronal silencing revealed that these local interneurons, AMMC-LN and AMMC-B2, shape the response pattern of AMMC-B1 neurons at a 15ms IPI. Neuronal silencing studies further suggested that both GABAergic local interneurons suppress the behavioral response to artificial pulse songs in flies, particularly those with a 15ms IPI. Altogether, we identified a circuit containing two GABAergic local interneurons that affects the temporal tuning of AMMC-B1 neurons in the song relay pathway and the behavioral response to the courtship song. Our findings suggest that feedforward inhibitory pathways adjust the behavioral response to courtship pulse songs in female flies.

    DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3644-17.2018

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  18. Auditory experience controls the maturation of song discrimination and sexual response in Drosophila

    Li Xiaodong, Ishimoto Hiroshi, Kamikouchi Azusa

    ELIFE   Vol. 7   2018.3

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    DOI: 10.7554/eLife.34348.001

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  19. Auditory experience controls the maturation of song discrimination and sexual response in Drosophila Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Xiaodong Li, Hiroshi Ishimoto, Azusa Kamikouchi

    eLife   Vol. 7 ( e34348 )   2018.3

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:eLife Sciences Publications Ltd  

    In birds and higher mammals, auditory experience during development is critical to discriminate sound patterns in adulthood. However, the neural and molecular nature of this acquired ability remains elusive. In fruit flies, acoustic perception has been thought to be innate. Here we report, surprisingly, that auditory experience of a species-specific courtship song in developing Drosophila shapes adult song perception and resultant sexual behavior. Preferences in the song-response behaviors of both males and females were tuned by social acoustic exposure during development. We examined the molecular and cellular determinants of this social acoustic learning and found that GABA signaling acting on the GABAA receptor Rdl in the pC1 neurons, the integration node for courtship stimuli, regulated auditory tuning and sexual behavior. These findings demonstrate that maturation of auditory perception in flies is unexpectedly plastic and is acquired socially, providing a model to investigate how song learning regulates mating preference in insects.

    DOI: 10.7554/eLife.34348

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  20. Anatomic and Physiologic Heterogeneity of Subgroup-A Auditory Sensory Neurons in Fruit Flies Reviewed

    Yuki Ishikawa, Natsuki Okamoto, Mizuki Nakamura, Hyunsoo Kim, Azusa Kamikouchi

    FRONTIERS IN NEURAL CIRCUITS   Vol. 11   page: 46   2017.6

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:FRONTIERS MEDIA SA  

    The antennal ear of the fruit fly detects acoustic signals in intraspecific communication, such as the courtship song and agonistic sounds. Among the five subgroups of mechanosensory neurons in the fly ear, subgroup-A neurons respond maximally to vibrations over a wide frequency range between 100 and 1,200 Hz. The functional organization of the neural circuit comprised of subgroup-A neurons, however, remains largely unknown. In the present study, we used 11 GAL4 strains that selectively label subgroup-A neurons and explored the diversity of subgroup-A neurons by combining single-cell anatomic analysis and Ca2+ imaging. Our findings indicate that the subgroup-A neurons that project into various combinations of subareas in the brain are more anatomically diverse than previously described. Subgroup-A neurons were also physiologically diverse, and some types were tuned to a narrow frequency range, suggesting that the response of subgroup-A neurons to sounds of a wide frequency range is due to the existence of several types of subgroup-A neurons. Further, we found that an auditory behavioral response to the courtship song of flies was attenuated when most subgroup-A neurons were silenced. Together, these findings characterize the heterogeneous functional organization of subgroup-A neurons, which might facilitate species-specific acoustic signal detection.

    DOI: 10.3389/fncir.2017.00046

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  21. Neuronal mechanisms of evolution of species-specific pheromone preference in Drosophila

    Ishikawa Yuki, Kamikouchi Azusa, Yamamoto Daisuke

    GENES & GENETIC SYSTEMS   Vol. 91 ( 6 ) page: 325-325   2016.12

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  22. Auditory system of fruit flies Invited Reviewed

    Yuki Ishikawa, Azusa Kamikouchi

    HEARING RESEARCH   Vol. 338   page: 1 - 8   2016.8

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    Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV  

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is an invaluable model for auditory research. Advantages of using the fruit fly include its stereotyped behavior in response to a particular sound, and the availability of molecular-genetic tools to manipulate gene expression and cellular activity. Although the receiver type in fruit flies differs from that in mammals, the auditory systems of mammals and fruit flies are strikingly similar with regard to the level of development, transduction mechanism, mechanical amplification, and central projections. These similarities strongly support the use of the fruit fly to study the general principles of acoustic information processing. In this review, we introduce acoustic communication and discuss recent advances in our understanding on hearing in fruit flies.
    This article is part of a Special Issue entitled &lt;Annual Reviews 2016&gt;. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    DOI: 10.1016/j.heares.2015.10.017

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  23. Organization of projection neurons and local neurons of the primary auditory center in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster Reviewed

    Eriko Matsuo, Haruyoshi Seki, Tomonori Asai, Takako Morimoto, Hiroyoshi Miyakawa, Kei Ito, Azusa Kamikouchi

    JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE NEUROLOGY   Vol. 524 ( 6 ) page: 1099 - 1164   2016.4

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    Acoustic communication between insects serves as an excellent model system for analyzing the neuronal mechanisms underlying auditory information processing. The detailed organization of auditory neural circuits in the brain has not yet been described. To understand the central auditory pathways, we used the brain of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model and performed a large-scale analysis of the interneurons associated with the primary auditory center. By screening expression driver strains and performing single-cell labeling of these strains, we identified 44 types of interneurons innervating the primary auditory center. Five types were local interneurons whereas the other 39 types were projection interneurons connecting the primary auditory center with other brain regions. The projection neurons comprised three frequency-selective pathways and two frequency-embracive pathways. Mapping of their connection targets revealed that five neuropils in the brainthe wedge (WED), anterior ventrolateral protocerebrum, posterior ventrolateral protocerebrum (PVLP), saddle (SAD), and gnathal ganglia (GNG)were intensively connected with the primary auditory center. In addition, several other neuropils, including visual and olfactory centers in the brain, were directly connected to the primary auditory center. The distribution patterns of the spines and boutons of the identified neurons suggest that auditory information is sent mainly from the primary auditory center to the PVLP, WED, SAD, GNG, and thoracico-abdominal ganglia. Based on these findings, we established the first comprehensive map of secondary auditory interneurons, which indicates the downstream information flow to parallel ascending pathways, multimodal pathways, and descending pathways. (c) 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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  24. Auditory Transduction

    Eberl Daniel F., Kamikouchi Azusa, Albert Joerg T.

    INSECT HEARING: WITH 53 ILLUSTRATIONS   Vol. 55   page: 159-175   2016

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    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-28890-1_7

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  25. Hearing in Drosophila

    Kamikouchi Azusa, Ishikawa Yuki

    INSECT HEARING: WITH 53 ILLUSTRATIONS   Vol. 55   page: 239-262   2016

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    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-28890-1_10

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  26. The organization of auditory neural circuits in the fruit-fly brain International coauthorship

    Kamikouchi Azusa

    JOURNAL OF PHARMACOLOGICAL SCIENCES   Vol. 128 ( 3 ) page: S70 - S70   2015.7

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  27. The Nutrient-Responsive Hormone CCHamide-2 Controls Growth by Regulating Insulin-like Peptides in the Brain of Drosophila melanogaster Reviewed

    Hiroko Sano, Akira Nakamura, Michael J. Texada, James W. Truman, Hiroshi Ishimoto, Azusa Kamikouchi, Yutaka Nibu, Kazuhiko Kume, Takanori Ida, Masayasu Kojima

    PLOS GENETICS   Vol. 11 ( 5 ) page: e1005209   2015.5

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    The coordination of growth with nutritional status is essential for proper development and physiology. Nutritional information is mostly perceived by peripheral organs before being relayed to the brain, which modulates physiological responses. Hormonal signaling ensures this organ-to-organ communication, and the failure of endocrine regulation in humans can cause diseases including obesity and diabetes. In Drosophila melanogaster, the fat body (adipose tissue) has been suggested to play an important role in coupling growth with nutritional status. Here, we show that the peripheral tissue-derived peptide hormone CCHamide-2 (CCHa2) acts as a nutrient-dependent regulator of Drosophila insulin-like peptides (Dilps). A BAC-based transgenic reporter revealed strong expression of CCHa2 receptor (CCHa2-R) in insulin-producing cells (IPCs) in the brain. Calcium imaging of brain explants and IPC-specific CCHa2-R knockdown demonstrated that peripheral-tissue derived CCHa2 directly activates IPCs. Interestingly, genetic disruption of either CCHa2 or CCHa2-R caused almost identical defects in larval growth and developmental timing. Consistent with these phenotypes, the expression of dilp5, and the release of both Dilp2 and Dilp5, were severely reduced. Furthermore, transcription of CCHa2 is altered in response to nutritional levels, particularly of glucose. These findings demonstrate that CCHa2 and CCHa2-R form a direct link between peripheral tissues and the brain, and that this pathway is essential for the coordination of systemic growth with nutritional availability. A mammalian homologue of CCHa2-R, Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (Brs3), is an orphan receptor that is expressed in the islet beta-cells; however, the role of Brs3 in insulin regulation remains elusive. Our genetic approach in Drosophila melanogaster provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that bombesin receptor signaling with its endogenous ligand promotes insulin production.

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  28. Identification of novel vibration- and deflection-sensitive neuronal subgroups in Johnston's organ of the fruit fly Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Eriko Matsuo, Daichi Yamada, Yuki Ishikawa, Tomonori Asai, Hiroshi Ishimoto, Azusa Kamikouchi

    FRONTIERS IN PHYSIOLOGY   Vol. 5   page: 179   2014.5

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    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster responds behaviorally to sound, gravity, and wind. Johnston's organ (JO) at the antennal base serves as a sensory organ in the fruit fly to detect these mechanosensory stimuli. Among the five anatomically defined subgroups of sensory neurons in JO, subgroups A and B detect sound vibrations and subgroups C and E respond to static deflections, such as gravity and wind. The functions of subgroup-D JO neurons, however, remain unknown. In this study, we used molecular-genetic methods to explore the physiologic properties of subgroup-D JO neurons. Both vibrations and static deflection of the antennal receiver activated subgroup-D JO neurons. This finding clearly revealed that zone D in the antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC), the projection target of subgroup-D JO neurons, is a primary center for antennal vibrations and deflection in the fly brain. We anatomically identified two types of interneurons downstream of subgroup-D JO neurons, AMMC local neurons (AM MC LNs), and AMMC D1 neurons. AMMC LNs are local neurons whose projections are confined within the AMMC, connecting zones B and D. On the other hand, AMMC D1 neurons have both local dendritic arborizations within the AMMC and descending projections to the thoracic ganglia, suggesting that AM MC D1 neurons are likely to relay information of the antennal movement detected by subgroup-D JO neurons from the AMMC directly to the thorax. Together, these findings provide a neural basis for how JO and its brain targets encode information of complex movements of the fruit fly antenna.

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  29. Identification of novel vibration- and deflection-sensitive neuronal subgroups in Johnston's organ of the fruit fly. Reviewed

    Matsuo E, Yamada D, Ishikawa Y, Asai T, Ishimoto H, Kamikouchi A

    Frontiers in physiology   Vol. 5   page: 179   2014

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  30. ショウジョウバエの音響交信を支える神経基盤 ー 求愛歌を受容する聴覚系のしくみ ー

    上川内あづさ

    生物科学   Vol. 65 ( 2 ) page: 95-101   2013.11

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  31. Selectivity and Plasticity in a Sound-Evoked Male-Male Interaction in Drosophila Reviewed

    Jeonghyeon Yoon, Eriko Matsuo, Daichi Yamada, Hiroshi Mizuno, Takako Morimoto, Hiroyoshi Miyakawa, Setsuo Kinoshita, Hiroshi Ishimoto, Azusa Kamikouchi

    PLOS ONE   Vol. 8 ( 9 ) page: e74289   2013.9

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    During courtship, many animals, including insects, birds, fish, and mammals, utilize acoustic signals to transmit information about species identity. Although auditory communication is crucial across phyla, the neuronal and physiologic processes are poorly understood. Sound-evoked chaining behavior, a display of homosexual courtship behavior in Drosophila males, has long been used as an excellent model for analyzing auditory behavior responses, outcomes of acoustic perception and higher-order brain functions. Here we developed a new method, termed ChaIN (Chain Index Numerator), in which we use a computer-based auto detection system for chaining behavior. The ChaIN system can systematically detect the chaining behavior induced by a series of modified courtship song playbacks. Two evolutionarily related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans, exhibited dramatic selective increases in chaining behavior when exposed to specific auditory cues, suggesting that auditory discrimination processes are involved in the acceleration of chaining behavior. Prolonged monotonous pulse sounds containing courtship song components also induced high intense chaining behavior. Interestingly, the chaining behavior was gradually suppressed over time when song playback continued. This behavioral change is likely to be a plastic behavior and not a simple sensory adaptation or fatigue, because the suppression was released by applying a different pulse pattern. This behavioral plasticity is not a form of habituation because different modality stimuli did not recover the behavioral suppression. Intriguingly, this plastic behavior partially depended on the cAMP signaling pathway controlled by the rutabaga adenylyl cyclase gene that is important for learning and memory. Taken together, this study demonstrates the selectivity and behavioral kinetics of the sound-induced interacting behavior of Drosophila males, and provides a basis for the systematic analysis of genes and neural circuits underlying complex acoustic behavior.

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  32. Auditory neuroscience in fruit flies Reviewed

    Azusa Kamikouchi

    NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH   Vol. 76 ( 3 ) page: 113 - 118   2013.7

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    Since the first analysis of the Drosophila courtship song more than 50 years ago, the molecular and neural mechanisms underlying the acoustic communication between fruit flies has been studied extensively. The results of recent studies utilizing a wide array of genetic tools provide novel insights into the anatomic and functional characteristics of the auditory and other mechanosensory systems in the fruit fly. Johnston's hearing organ, the antennal ear of the fruit fly, serves as a complex sensor not only for near-field sound but also for gravity and wind. These auditory and non-auditory signals travel in parallel from the fly ear to the brain, feeding into neural pathways similar to the auditory and vestibular pathways of the human brain. This review discusses these recent findings and outlines auditory neuroscience in flies. (c) 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

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  33. Neuronal encoding of sound, gravity, and wind in the fruit fly Reviewed

    Eriko Matsuo, Azusa Kamikouchi

    JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY A-NEUROETHOLOGY SENSORY NEURAL AND BEHAVIORAL PHYSIOLOGY   Vol. 199 ( 4 ) page: 253 - 262   2013.4

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    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster responds behaviorally to sound, gravity, and wind. Exposure to male courtship songs results in reduced locomotion in females, whereas males begin to chase each other. When agitated, fruit flies tend to move against gravity. When faced with air currents, they 'freeze' in place. Based on recent studies, Johnston's hearing organ, the antennal ear of the fruit fly, serves as a sensor for all of these mechanosensory stimuli. Compartmentalization of sense cells in Johnston's organ into vibration-sensitive and deflection-sensitive neural groups allows this single organ to mediate such varied functions. Sound and gravity/wind signals sensed by these two neuronal groups travel in parallel from the fly ear to the brain, feeding into neural pathways reminiscent of the auditory and vestibular pathways in the human brain. Studies of the similarities between mammals and flies will lead to a better understanding of the principles of how sound and gravity information is encoded in the brain. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of these principles and discuss the advantages of the fruit fly as a model system to explore the fundamental principles of how neural circuits and their ensembles process and integrate sensory information in the brain.

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  34. Auditory and gravity/wind pathways that start in the Drosophila ear

    Matsuo E, Kamikouchi A

    Saibou Kougaku   Vol. 32 ( 4 ) page: 454-460   2013.3

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  35. Selectivity and plasticity in a sound-evoked male-male interaction in Drosophila. Reviewed

    Yoon J, Matsuo E, Yamada D, Mizuno H, Morimoto T, Miyakawa H, Kinoshita S, Ishimoto H, Kamikouchi A

    PloS one   Vol. 8   page: e74289   2013

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  36. [Exploring the neural circuits for sound and gravity senses in the fruit fly].

    Kamikouchi A

    Seikagaku. The Journal of Japanese Biochemical Society   Vol. 83 ( 5 ) page: 399 - 402   2011.5

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  37. 分子遺伝学で探るショウジョウバエの聴覚と重力感覚の神経回路

    上川内あづさ

    生化学   Vol. 83 ( 5 ) page: 399-402   2011

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  38. Systems neurobiology for auditory systems: a new strategy using a gene-expression induction system

    Kamikouchi A, Ito K

    Jikkenn Igaku     page: .   2011

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  39. ショウジョウバエの音と重力の受容システムの解明

    上川内あづさ、伊藤啓

    生物物理   Vol. 50 ( 6 ) page: 282-285   2010.12

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    DOI: 10.2142/biophys.50.282

  40. Mechanical feedback amplification in Drosophila hearing is independent of synaptic transmission Reviewed

    Azusa Kamikouchi, Joerg T. Albert, Martin C. Goepfert

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE   Vol. 31 ( 4 ) page: 697 - 703   2010.2

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    Vertebrate inner-ear hair cells use mechanical feedback to amplify sound-induced vibrations. The gain of this &apos;cochlear amplifier&apos; is centrally controlled via efferent fibres that, making synaptic contacts with the hair cells, modulate the feedback gain. The sensory neurons of the Drosophila ear likewise employ mechanical feedback to assist sound-evoked vibrations, yet whether this neuron-based feedback is also subject to efferent control has remained uncertain. We show here that the function of Drosophila auditory neurons is independent of efferent modulation, and that no synaptic transmission is needed to control the gain of mechanical feedback amplification. Immunohistochemical, mechanical and electrophysiological analyses revealed that the Drosophila auditory organ lacks peripheral synapses and efferent innervations, and that blocking synaptic transmission in a pan-neural manner does not affect the afferent electrical activity of the sensory neurons or the mechanical feedback gain. Hence, unlike the cochlear amplifier of vertebrates, mechanical feedback amplification in Drosophila is not associated with an efferent control system but seems to be a purely local process that is solely controlled peripherally within the ear itself.

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  41. Transcuticular optical imaging of stimulus-evoked neural activities in the Drosophila peripheral nervous system Reviewed

    Azusa Kamikouchi, Robert Wiek, Thomas Effertz, Martin C. Goepfert, Andre Fiala

    NATURE PROTOCOLS   Vol. 5 ( 7 ) page: 1229 - 1235   2010

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    he nervous system of Drosophila is widely used to study neuronal signal processing because the activities of neurons can be controlled and monitored by cell type-specific expression of genetically encoded actuator and sensor proteins. Measuring neural activities in adult flies, however, usually requires surgical approaches to penetrate the firm and pigmented cuticular exoskeleton. Interfering with this exoskeleton is critical in the case of the peripheral nervous system (PNSPNSPNS), as sensory neurons are often located directly beneath the cuticle and are associated with specialized stimulus-receiving and -conducting cuticular structures. In this article, we describe how the activities of these neurons can be probed nondestructively through the cuticle if a genetically encoded fluorescent protein sensor with strong baseline fluorescence is used. The method is exemplified for mechanosensory neurons in the adult antenna but can also be applied to many other PNSPNSPNS neurons, as is shown for the femoral chordotonal organ located in the fly's leg.

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  42. Protocol for quantifying sound-sensing ability of Drosophila melanogaster Reviewed

    Hidehiko K. Inagaki, Azusa Kamikouchi, Kei Ito

    NATURE PROTOCOLS   Vol. 5 ( 1 ) page: 26 - 30   2010

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    Hearing is an important sensory modality for most animals to detect sound signals as they mate, look for food or fend off prey. Despite its critical role in numerous innate behaviors, relatively little is known about how the sensory information regarding the movement of air particles is detected, processed and integrated in the brain. Drosophila melanogaster, with a rather simple nervous system and the large variety of molecular and genetic tools available for its study, is an ideal model organism for dissecting the mechanisms underlying sound sensing. Here we describe assays to measure sound responses of flies behaviorally. Although this method was originally developed for mutant screening, it can also be combined with recent genetic techniques to analyze functions of the identified neural circuits by silencing or activating select sets of neurons. This assay requires similar to 15 min for an experiment and 1.5 h for subsequent analyses.

    DOI: 10.1038/nprot.2009.206

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  43. Methods for quantifying simple gravity sensing in Drosophila melanogaster Reviewed

    Hidehiko K. Inagaki, Azusa Kamikouchi, Kei Ito

    NATURE PROTOCOLS   Vol. 5 ( 1 ) page: 20 - 25   2010

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    Perception of gravity is essential for animals: most animals possess specific sense organs to detect the direction of the gravitational force. Little is known, however, about the molecular and neural mechanisms underlying their behavioral responses to gravity. Drosophila melanogaster, having a rather simple nervous system and a large variety of molecular genetic tools available, serves as an ideal model for analyzing the mechanisms underlying gravity sensing. Here we describe an assay to measure simple gravity responses of flies behaviorally. This method can be applied for screening genetic mutants of gravity perception. Furthermore, in combination with recent genetic techniques to silence or activate selective sets of neurons, it serves as a powerful tool to systematically identify neural substrates required for the proper behavioral responses to gravity. The assay requires 10 min to perform, and two experiments can be performed simultaneously, enabling 12 experiments per hour.

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  44. 脳構造・生理・行動制御の統合的解析モデルとしてのショウジョウバエ

    上川内あづさ, 稲垣秀彦, 萬涼子 [他]

    蛋白質核酸酵素   Vol. 54 ( 14 ) page: 1817-1826   2009.11

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  45. ショウジョウバエにおける音、重力、風検知の神経基盤

    上川内あづさ、稲垣秀彦、伊藤啓

    実験医学   Vol. 27 ( 13 ) page: .   2009.8

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  46. Distinct sensory representations of wind and near-field sound in the Drosophila brain Reviewed

    Suzuko Yorozu, Allan Wong, Brian J. Fischer, Heiko Dankert, Maurice J. Kernan, Azusa Kamikouchi, Kei Ito, David J. Anderson

    NATURE   Vol. 458 ( 7235 ) page: 201 - U4   2009.3

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    Behavioural responses to wind are thought to have a critical role in controlling the dispersal and population genetics of wild Drosophila species(1,2), as well as their navigation in flight(3), but their underlying neurobiological basis is unknown. We show that Drosophila melanogaster, like wild-caught Drosophila strains(4), exhibits robust wind-induced suppression of locomotion in response to air currents delivered at speeds normally encountered in nature(1,2). Here we identify wind-sensitive neurons in Johnston&apos;s organ, an antennal mechanosensory structure previously implicated in near-field sound detection (reviewed in refs 5 and 6). Using enhancer trap lines targeted to different subsets of Johnston&apos;s organ neurons(7), and a genetically encoded calcium indicator(8), we show that wind and near-field sound (courtship song) activate distinct populations of Johnston&apos;s organ neurons, which project to different regions of the antennal and mechanosensory motor centre in the central brain. Selective genetic ablation of wind-sensitive Johnston&apos;s organ neurons in the antenna abolishes wind-induced suppression of locomotion behaviour, without impairing hearing. Moreover, different neuronal subsets within the wind-sensitive population respond to different directions of arista deflection caused by air flow and project to different regions of the antennal and mechanosensory motor centre, providing a rudimentary map of wind direction in the brain. Importantly, sound- and wind-sensitive Johnston&apos;s organ neurons exhibit different intrinsic response properties: the former are phasically activated by small, bi-directional, displacements of the aristae, whereas the latter are tonically activated by unidirectional, static deflections of larger magnitude. These different intrinsic properties are well suited to the detection of oscillatory pulses of near-field sound and laminar air flow, respectively. These data identify wind-sensitive neurons in Johnston&apos;s organ, a structure that has been primarily associated with hearing, and reveal how the brain can distinguish different types of air particle movements using a common sensory organ.

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  47. In vivo imaging of neural activities in Drosophila Johnston's organ.

    Journal of Neurogenetics   Vol. 23   page: S52-S53   2009

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  48. Comprehensive classification of the auditory sensory projections in the brain of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster Reviewed

    Azusa Kamikouchi, Takashi Shimada, Kei Ito

    JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE NEUROLOGY   Vol. 499 ( 3 ) page: 317 - 356   2006.11

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    We established a comprehensive projection map of the auditory receptor cells (Johnston's organ neurons: JONs) from the antennae to the primary auditory center of the Drosophila brain. We found 477 +/- 24 cell bodies of JONs, which are arranged like a "bottomless bowl" within the auditory organ. The target of the JONs in the brain comprises five spatially segregated zones, each of which is contributed by bundles of JON axons that gradually branch out from the antennal nerve. Four zones are confined in the antennal mechanosensory and motor center, whereas one zone further extends over parts of the ventrolateral protocerebrum and the subesophageal ganglion. Single-cell labeling with the FLP-out technique revealed that most JONs innervate only a single zone, indicating that JONs can be categorized into five groups according to their target zones. Within each zone, JONs innervate various combinations of subareas. We classified these five zones into 19 subareas according to the branching patterns and terminal distributions of single JON axons. The groups of JONs that innervate particular zones or subareas of the primary auditory center have their cell bodies in characteristic locations of the Johnston's organ in the antenna, e.g., in concentric rings or in paired clusters. Such structural organization suggests that each JON group, and hence each zone of the primary auditory center, might sense different aspects of sensory signals.

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  49. Insights into social insects from the genome of the honeybee Apis mellifera Reviewed

    George M. Weinstock, Gene E. Robinson, Richard A. Gibbs, Kim C. Worley, Jay D. Evans, Ryszard Maleszka, Hugh M. Robertson, Daniel B. Weaver, Martin Beye, Peer Bork, Christine G. Elsik, Klaus Hartfelder, Greg J. Hunt, Evgeny M. Zdobnov, Gro V. Amdam, Marcia M. G. Bitondi, Anita M. Collins, Alexandre S. Cristino, H. Michael G. Lattorff, Carlos H. Lobo, Robin F. A. Moritz, Francis M. F. Nunes, Robert E. Page, Zila L. P. Simoes, Diana Wheeler, Piero Carninci, Shiro Fukuda, Yoshihide Hayashizaki, Chikatoshi Kai, Jun Kawai, Naoko Sakazume, Daisuke Sasaki, Michihira Tagami, Stefan Albert, Geert Baggerman, Kyle T. Beggs, Guy Bloch, Giuseppe Cazzamali, Mira Cohen, Mark David Drapeau, Dorothea Eisenhardt, Christine Emore, Michael A. Ewing, Susan E. Fahrbach, Sylvain Foret, Cornelis J. P. Grimmelikhuijzen, Frank Hauser, Amanda B. Hummon, Jurgen Huybrechts, Andrew K. Jones, Tatsuhiko Kadowaki, Noam Kaplan, Robert Kucharski, Gerard Leboulle, Michal Linial, J. Troy Littleton, Alison R. Mercer, Timothy A. Richmond, Sandra L. Rodriguez-Zas, Elad B. Rubin, David B. Sattelle, David Schlipalius, Liliane Schoofs, Yair Shemesh, Jonathan V. Sweedler, Rodrigo Velarde, Peter Verleyen, Evy Vierstraete, Michael R. Williamson, Seth A. Ament, Susan J. Brown, Miguel Corona, Peter K. Dearden, W. Augustine Dunn, Michelle M. Elekonich, Tomoko Fujiyuki, Irene Gattermeier, Tanja Gempe, Martin Hasselmann, Tatsuhiko Kadowaki, Eriko Kage, Azusa Kamikouchi, Takeo Kubo, Robert Kucharski, Takekazu Kunieda, Marce D. Lorenzen, Natalia V. Milshina, Mizue Morioka, Kazuaki Ohashi, Ross Overbeek, Christian A. Ross, Morten Schioett, Teresa Shippy, Hideaki Takeuchi, Amy L. Toth, Judith H. Willis, Megan J. Wilson, Karl H. J. Gordon, Ivica Letunic, Kevin Hackett, Jane Peterson, Adam Felsenfeld, Mark Guyer, Michel Solignac, Richa Agarwala, Jean Marie Cornuet, Monique Monnerot, Florence Mougel, Justin T. Reese, Dominique Vautrin, Joseph J. Gillespie, Jamie J. Cannone, Robin R. Gutell, J. Spencer Johnston, Michael B. Eisen, Venky N. Iyer, Vivek Iyer, Peter Kosarev, Aaron J. Mackey, Victor Solovyev, Alexandre Souvorov, Katherine A. Aronstein, Katarina Bilikova, Yan Ping Chen, Andrew G. Clark, Laura I. Decanini, William M. Gelbart, Charles Hetru, Dan Hultmark, Jean-Luc Imler, Haobo Jiang, Michael Kanost, Kiyoshi Kimura, Brian P. Lazzaro, Dawn L. Lopez, Jozef Simuth, Graham J. Thompson, Zhen Zou, Pieter De Jong, Erica Sodergren, Miklos Csuroes, Aleksandar Milosavljevic, Kazutoyo Osoegawa, Stephen Richards, Chung-Li Shu, Laurent Duret, Eran Elhaik, Dan Graur, Juan M. Anzola, Kathryn S. Campbell, Kevin L. Childs, Derek Collinge, Madeline A. Crosby, C. Michael Dickens, L. Sian Grametes, Christina M. Grozinger, Peter L. Jones, Mireia Jorda, Xu Ling, Beverly B. Matthews, Jonathan Miller, Craig Mizzen, Miguel A. Peinado, Jeffrey G. Reid, Susan M. Russo, Andrew J. Schroeder, Susan E. St Pierre, Ying Wang, Pinglei Zhou, Huaiyang Jiang, Paul Kitts, Barbara Ruef, Anand Venkatraman, Lan Zhang, Gildardo Aquino-Perez, Charles W. Whitfield, Susanta K. Behura, Stewart H. Berlocher, Walter S. Sheppard, Deborah R. Smith, Andrew V. Suarez, Neil D. Tsutsui, Xuehong Wei, David Wheeler, Paul Havlak, Bingshan Li, Yue Liu, Erica Sodergren, Angela Jolivet, Sandra Lee, Lynne V. Nazareth, Ling-Ling Pu, Rachel Thorn, Viktor Stolc, Thomas Newman, Manoj Samanta, Waraporn A. Tongprasit, Charles Claudianos, May R. Berenbaum, Sunita Biswas, Dirk C. de Graaf, Rene Feyereisen, Reed M. Johnson, John G. Oakeshott, Hilary Ranson, Mary A. Schuler, Donna Muzny, Joseph Chacko, Clay Davis, Huyen Dinh, Rachel Gill, Judith Hernandez, Sandra Hines, Jennifer Hume, LaRonda Jackson, Christie Kovar, Lora Lewis, George Miner, Margaret Morgan, Ngoc Nguyen, Geoffrey Okwuonu, Heidi Paul, Jireh Santibanez, Glenford Savery, Amanda Svatek, Donna Villasana, Rita Wright

    NATURE   Vol. 443 ( 7114 ) page: 931 - 949   2006.10

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    Here we report the genome sequence of the honeybee Apis mellifera, a key model for social behaviour and essential to global ecology through pollination. Compared with other sequenced insect genomes, the A. mellifera genome has high A+T and CpG contents, lacks major transposon families, evolves more slowly, and is more similar to vertebrates for circadian rhythm, RNA interference and DNA methylation genes, among others. Furthermore, A. mellifera has fewer genes for innate immunity, detoxification enzymes, cuticle-forming proteins and gustatory receptors, more genes for odorant receptors, and novel genes for nectar and pollen utilization, consistent with its ecology and social organization. Compared to Drosophila, genes in early developmental pathways differ in Apis, whereas similarities exist for functions that differ markedly, such as sex determination, brain function and behaviour. Population genetics suggests a novel African origin for the species A. mellifera and insights into whether Africanized bees spread throughout the New World via hybridization or displacement.

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  50. Carbohydrate metabolism genes and pathways in insects: insights from the honey bee genome Reviewed

    T. Kunieda, T. Fujiyuki, R. Kucharski, S. Foret, S. A. Ament, A. L. Toth, K. Ohashi, H. Takeuchi, A. Kamikouchi, E. Kage, M. Morioka, M. Beye, T. Kubo, G. E. Robinson, R. Maleszka

    INSECT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY   Vol. 15 ( 5 ) page: 563 - 576   2006.10

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:BLACKWELL PUBLISHING  

    Carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes may have particularly interesting roles in the honey bee, Apis mellifera, because this social insect has an extremely carbohydrate-rich diet, and nutrition plays important roles in caste determination and socially mediated behavioural plasticity. We annotated a total of 174 genes encoding carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes and 28 genes encoding lipid-metabolizing enzymes, based on orthology to their counterparts in the fly, Drosophila melanogaster, and the mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. We found that the number of genes for carbohydrate metabolism appears to be more evolutionarily labile than for lipid metabolism. In particular, we identified striking changes in gene number or genomic organization for genes encoding glycolytic enzymes, cellulase, glucose oxidase and glucose dehydrogenases, glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductases, fucosyltransferases, and lysozymes.

    DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2583.2006.00677.x

    Web of Science

    PubMed

  51. Specification of auditory sensitivity by Drosophila TRP channels Reviewed

    Martin C. Goepfert, Joerg T. Albert, B. Nadrowski, A. Kamikouchi

    NATURE NEUROSCIENCE   Vol. 9 ( 8 ) page: 999 - 1000   2006.8

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP  

    Ears achieve their exquisite sensitivity by means of mechanical feedback: motile mechanosensory cells through their active motion boost the mechanical input from the ear. Examination of the auditory mechanics in Drosophila melanogaster mutants shows that the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel NompC is required to promote this feedback, whereas the TRP vanilloid (TRPV) channels Nan and Iav serve to control the feedback gain. The combined function of these channels specifies the sensitivity of the fly auditory organ.

    DOI: 10.1038/nn1735

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    PubMed

  52. Structure and function of the Drosophila auditory pathway

    Azusa Kamikouchi, Kei Ito, Andre Fiala, Martin C. Goepfert

    JOURNAL OF NEUROGENETICS   Vol. 20 ( 3-4 ) page: 140 - 141   2006.7

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    Web of Science

  53. Mechanical tracing of protein function in the Drosophila ear.

    Albert JT, Nadrowski B, Kamikouchi A, Göpfert MC

    Nature Protocols   Vol. 2006.364.   page: .   2006

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

  54. Analysis of the distribution of the brain cells of the fruit fly by an automatic cell counting algorithm

    T Shimada, K Kato, A Kamikouchi, K Ito

    PHYSICA A-STATISTICAL MECHANICS AND ITS APPLICATIONS   Vol. 350 ( 1 ) page: 144 - 149   2005.5

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV  

    The fruit fly is the smallest brain-having model animal. Its brain is said to consist only of about 250,000 neurons, whereas it shows "the rudiments of consciousness" in addition to its high abilities such as learning and memory. As the starting point of the exhaustive analysis of its brain-circuit information, we have developed a new algorithm of counting cells automatically from source 2D/3D figures. In our algorithm, counting cells is realized by embedding objects (typically, disks/balls), each of which has exclusive volume. Using this method, we have succeeded in counting thousands of cells accurately. This method provides us the information necessary for the analysis of brain circuits: the precise distribution of the whole brain cells. (c) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    DOI: 10.1016/j.physa.2004.11.033

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  55. Identification and punctate nuclear localization of a novel noncoding RNA, Ks-1, from the honeybee brain Reviewed

    M Sawata, D Yoshino, H Takeuchi, A Kamikouchi, K Ohashi, T Kubo

    RNA-A PUBLICATION OF THE RNA SOCIETY   Vol. 8 ( 6 ) page: 772 - 785   2002.6

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS  

    We identified a novel gene, Ks-1, which is expressed preferentially in the small-type Kenyon cells of the honeybee brain. This gene is also expressed in some of the large soma neurons in the brain and In the suboesophageal ganglion. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction experiments Indicated that Ks-1 transcripts are enriched in the honeybee brain. cDNA cloning revealed that the consensus Ks-1 cDNA is over 17 kbp and contains no significant open reading frames. Furthermore, fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed that Ks-1 transcripts are located in the nuclei of the neural cells, accumulating In some scattered spots. These findings demonstrate that Ks-1 encodes a novel class of noncoding nuclear RNA and is possibly involved in the regulation of neural functions.

    DOI: 10.1017/S1355838202028790

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    PubMed

  56. Identification of genes expressed preferentially in the honeybee mushroom bodies by combination of differential display and cDNA microarray Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    H Takeuchi, T Fujiyuki, K Shirai, Y Matsuo, A Kamikouchi, Y Fujinawa, A Kato, A Tsujimoto, T Kubo

    FEBS LETTERS   Vol. 513 ( 2-3 ) page: 230 - 234   2002.2

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV  

    To clarify the molecular basis underlying the neural function of the honeybee mushroom bodies (MBs), we identified three genes preferentially expressed in MB using cDNA microarrays containing 480 differential display-positive candidate cDNAs expressed locally or differentially, dependent on caste/aggressive behavior in the honeybee brain. One of the cDNAs encodes a putative type I inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) 5-phosphatase and was expressed preferentially in one of two types of intrinsic MB neurons, the large-type Kenyon cells, suggesting that IP3-mediated Ca2+ signaling is enhanced in these neurons. (C) 2002 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

    DOI: 10.1016/S0014-5793(02)02319-0

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    PubMed

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Books 9

  1. The Senses: A Comprehensive Reference (Second Edition) International journal

    Jörg T. Albert, Andrew P. Jarman, Azusa Kamikouchi, Alyona Kedera( Role: Contributor ,  Drosophila as a Model for Hearing and Deafness.)

    Elsevier  2020.9 

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    Language:English

  2. 遺伝子から解き明かす脳の不思議な世界(webコンテンツ付き) International journal

    滋野修一, 野村真, 村上安則( Role: Joint author)

    一色出版  2018.12  ( ISBN:4909383050

  3. Insect Hearing (Springer Handbook of Auditory Research) International journal

    Kamikouchi A, Ishikawa Y( Role: Contributor ,  Hearing in Drosophila.)

    Springer  2016.6  ( ISBN:3319288881

  4. 研究者が教える動物実験 第1巻―感覚― International journal

    石元広志, 上川内あづさ, 松尾恵倫子, 上川内あづさ( Role: Contributor ,  音への応答行動を測る:求愛歌は効果あり?/重力への応答行動を測る:ショウジョウバエは上に逃げる?)

    共立出版  2015.8 

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    Language:English

  5. 動物行動の分子生物学 (新・生命科学シリーズ) International journal

    久保 健雄, 上川内 あづさ, 竹内 秀明, 奥山 輝大, 太田 次郎, 浅島 誠, 長田 敏行, 赤坂 甲治( Role: Joint author)

    裳華房  2014.7  ( ISBN:4785358580

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    Total pages:180   Language:English

    ASIN

  6. 動物行動の分子生物学 (新・生命科学シリーズ)

    久保 健雄, 上川内 あづさ, 竹内 秀明, 奥山 輝大( Role: Joint author)

    裳華房  2014.7  ( ISBN:4785358580

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    Language:Japanese

  7. Methods in Neuroethological Research International journal

    Hiroto Ogawa, Kotaro Oka( Role: Joint author)

    Springer  2013.7  ( ISBN:4431543309

  8. 「分子生物学的手法を用いたショウジョウバエ聴覚系の解析」 In: 分子昆虫学 ポストゲノムの昆虫研究(神村学ら編) International journal

    上川内あづさ( Role: Joint author)

    共立出版  2009.8  ( ISBN:4320056957

  9. 「ショウジョウバエ ー GAL4エンハンサートラップ法を用いたin vivoイメージング」 In: 蛍光・発光試薬の選び方と使い方(三輪佳宏編) International journal

    上川内あづさ, 伊藤啓( Role: Joint author)

    羊土社  2007.10  ( ISBN:4758107173

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MISC 19

  1. Neuronal mechanisms of evolution of species-specific pheromone preference in Drosophila International coauthorship

    Yuki Ishikawa, Azusa Kamikouchi, Daisuke Yamamoto

    GENES & GENETIC SYSTEMS   Vol. 91 ( 6 ) page: 325 - 325   2016.12

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper, summary (international conference)   Publisher:GENETICS SOC JAPAN  

    Web of Science

  2. ショウジョウバエの音響交信を支える神経基盤 ー 求愛歌を受容する聴覚系のしくみ ー Invited Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    上川内あづさ

    生物科学   Vol. 65 ( 2 ) page: 95 - 101   2013.11

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper, summary (international conference)  

  3. ショウジョウバエ聴覚神経系における回路特性の解明 International coauthorship

    松尾恵倫子, 関治由, 浅井智紀, 森本高子, 宮川博義, 伊藤啓, 上川内あづさ

    日本動物学会大会予稿集   Vol. 84th   page: 195   2013.8

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper, summary (international conference)  

    J-GLOBAL

  4. Auditory and gravity/wind pathways that start in the Drosophila ear Invited International coauthorship International journal

    Matsuo E, Kamikouchi A

    Saibou Kougaku   Vol. 32 ( 4 ) page: 454 - 460   2013.3

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Article, review, commentary, editorial, etc. (trade magazine, newspaper, online media)  

  5. ショウジョウバエ聴覚系における高次神経回路の解析 International coauthorship

    松尾恵倫子, 関治由, 浅井智紀, 森本高子, 宮川博義, 伊藤啓, 上川内あづさ

    日本動物学会大会予稿集   Vol. 83rd   page: 107   2012.8

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper, summary (international conference)  

    J-GLOBAL

  6. 分子遺伝学で探るショウジョウバエの聴覚と重力感覚の神経回路 Invited Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    上川内あづさ

    生化学   Vol. 83 ( 5 ) page: 399 - 402   2011

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Article, review, commentary, editorial, etc. (scientific journal)  

  7. Systems neurobiology for auditory systems: a new strategy using a gene-expression induction system Invited International coauthorship International journal

    Kamikouchi A, Ito K

    Jikkenn Igaku     2011

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  8. Anatomy of the secondary auditory neurons AMMC-A1 in the Drosophila brain International coauthorship

    Haruyoshi Seki, Yumi Ishiguro, Hiroyoshi Miyakawa, Takako Morimoto, Azusa Kamikouchi

    NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH   Vol. 71   page: E151 - E151   2011

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper, summary (international conference)   Publisher:ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD  

    DOI: 10.1016/j.neures.2011.07.651

    Web of Science

  9. The auditory map in the fly brain International coauthorship

    Azusa Kamikouchi, Haruyoshi Seki, Hiroshi Mizuno, Hiroyoshi Miyakawa, Kei Ito, Takako Morimoto

    NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH   Vol. 71   page: E21 - E22   2011

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper, summary (international conference)   Publisher:ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD  

    DOI: 10.1016/j.neures.2011.07.090

    Web of Science

  10. ショウジョウバエの音と重力の受容システムの解明 Invited Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    上川内あづさ, 伊藤啓

    生物物理   Vol. 50 ( 6 ) page: 282 - 285   2010.12

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Article, review, commentary, editorial, etc. (scientific journal)  

    DOI: 10.2142/biophys.50.282

  11. ショウジョウバエにおける音,重力,風検知の神経基盤 International coauthorship

    上川内あづさ, 稲垣秀彦, GOPFERT Martin C, 宮川博義, 森本高子, 伊藤啓

    解剖学雑誌   Vol. 85 ( Supplement ) page: 75   2010.3

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Research paper, summary (international conference)  

    J-GLOBAL

  12. Anatomy and function of the secondary auditory neurons AMMC-B1 in the fruit fly brain International coauthorship

    Azusa Kamikouchi, Koji Hikita, Hiroshi Mizuno, Ryo Sato, Hiroyoshi Miyakawa, Kei Ito, Takako Morimoto

    NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH   Vol. 68   page: E274 - E274   2010

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper, summary (international conference)   Publisher:ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD  

    DOI: 10.1016/j.neures.2010.07.1218

    Web of Science

  13. Identification of neurons that project to the secondary auditory center in the Drosophila brain International coauthorship

    Haruyoshi Seki, Atsushi Uchida, Kei Ito, Hiroyoshi Miyakawa, Takako Morimoto, Azusa Kamikouchi

    NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH   Vol. 68   page: E274 - E274   2010

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper, summary (international conference)   Publisher:ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD  

    DOI: 10.1016/j.neures.2010.07.1219

    Web of Science

  14. 脳構造・生理・行動制御の統合的解析モデルとしてのショウジョウバエ International coauthorship International journal

    上川内あづさ, 稲垣秀彦, 萬涼子

    蛋白質核酸酵素   Vol. 54 ( 14 ) page: 1817 - 1826   2009.11

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    Language:Japanese   Publishing type:Article, review, commentary, editorial, etc. (scientific journal)   Publisher:共立出版  

  15. ショウジョウバエにおける音、重力、風検知の神経基盤 International coauthorship International journal

    上川内あづさ, 稲垣秀彦, 伊藤啓

    実験医学   Vol. 27 ( 13 )   2009.8

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  16. The neural basis of Drosophila gravity-sensing and hearing

    Azusa Kamikouchi, Hidehiko K. Inagaki, Thomas Effertz, Oliver Hendrich, Andre Fiala, Martin C. Goepfert, Kei Ito

    NATURE   Vol. 458 ( 7235 ) page: 165 - U1   2009.3

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    The neural substrates that the fruitfly Drosophila uses to sense smell, taste and light share marked structural and functional similarities with ours, providing attractive models to dissect sensory stimulus processing. Here we focus on two of the remaining and less understood prime sensory modalities: graviception and hearing. We show that the fly has implemented both sensory modalities into a single system, Johnston&apos;s organ, which houses specialized clusters of mechanosensory neurons, each of which monitors specific movements of the antenna. Gravity- and sound-sensitive neurons differ in their response characteristics, and only the latter express the candidate mechanotransducer channel NompC. The two neural subsets also differ in their central projections, feeding into neural pathways that are reminiscent of the vestibular and auditory pathways in our brain. By establishing the Drosophila counterparts of these sensory systems, our findings provide the basis for a systematic functional and molecular dissection of how different mechanosensory stimuli are detected and processed.

    DOI: 10.1038/nature07810

    Web of Science

  17. In vivo imaging of neural activities in Drosophila Johnston&apos;s organ International coauthorship International journal

    Azusa Kamikouchi, Andre Fiala, Thomas Effertz, Martin C. Goepfert

    JOURNAL OF NEUROGENETICS   Vol. 23   page: S52 - S53   2009

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper, summary (international conference)   Publisher:TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD  

    Web of Science

  18. The neural circuits of Drosophila gravity sensing and hearing International coauthorship

    Azusa Kamikouchi, Hidehiko K. Inagaki, Thomas Effertz, Andre Fiala, Kei Ito, Martin C. Gopfert

    NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH   Vol. 65   page: S15 - S16   2009

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper, summary (international conference)   Publisher:ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD  

    DOI: 10.1016/j.neures.2009.09.1565

    Web of Science

  19. The neural basis of Drosophila gravity sensing and hearing International coauthorship

    Hidehiko Inagaki, Azusa Kamikouchi, Thomas Effertz, Andre Fiala, Martin C. Goepfert, Kei Ito

    JOURNAL OF NEUROGENETICS   Vol. 23   page: S69 - S70   2009

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper, summary (international conference)   Publisher:TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD  

    Web of Science

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KAKENHI (Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research) 28

  1. ショウジョウバエ聴覚馴化システムをモデルとした記憶ダイナミズムの共通原理の解明

    2013 - 2017

    科学研究費補助金  その他

    上川内 あづさ

  2. ショウジョウバエ音識別システムのトポロジー構造と情報処理ダイナミクスの包括解明

    2013 - 2015

    科学研究費補助金  若手研究(A)

    上川内 あづさ

  3. ショウジョウバエ聴覚系を用いた新規短期記憶モデルの開発と応用

    2013 - 2015

    科学研究費補助金 

    上川内 あづさ

  4. From genes to circuits: the evolution of species-specific communication in Drosophila

    2011.6 - 2014

    Human Frontier Science Program  Human Frontier Science Program 

    Joerg T. Albert

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    Grant type:Competitive

  5. 聴覚情報処理を担う機能モジュールの体系的な同定と解析

    2011 - 2012

    科学研究費補助金  その他

    上川内あづさ

  6. ショウジョウバエ脳において聴覚情報処理を行う神経基盤の解明

    2010 - 2014

    科学技術振興機構(JST)  さきがけ  若手研究(B)

    上川内あづさ

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    Authorship:Principal investigator  Grant type:Competitive

  7. Decoding acoustic communication in mosquitoes: from distortion products to vector control

    2021.10 - 2024.9

    Human Frontier Science Program  Research Grant 

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Mosquitoes transmit diseases which affect billions of people worldwide every year. Novel mosquito control tools are urgently needed to help combat the seemingly unstoppable spread of these diseases.

    The strong attraction of male mosquitoes to the sound of flying females has proven an inviting target for new methods of mosquito control. However, interventions targeting hearing have largely proven ineffective in field trials. Only by understanding mosquito audition at multiple levels can we decode their communication systems and thus develop effective hearing-based interventions.

    This project therefore focuses on revealing the key mechanisms underlying mosquito hearing in two major mosquito species with distinct mating behaviors (Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae). This includes functional imaging and neuroanatomical investigations of the mosquito ear, building to electrophysiological tests of mosquito auditory responses to increasingly complex stimuli.

    This will inform – and be informed by - novel mathematical models of mosquito hearing at both individual and group levels. Acoustic stimuli, refined by electrophysiological, behavioral and mathematical experimentation, will finally be tested in the field to judge their effectiveness in real world conditions.

    This project will improve our neuroscientific knowledge of one of the most unique hearing organs in the animal kingdom, and also lay the groundwork for using sound and bioacoustical interventions to manipulate mosquito behavior.

  8. ハエ歌識別学習を用いた臨界期可塑性の機構解明への挑戦

    Grant number:21H05689  2021.9 - 2023.3

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費助成事業 学術変革領域研究(A)  学術変革領域研究(A)

    上川内 あづさ

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\7800000 ( Direct Cost: \6000000 、 Indirect Cost:\1800000 )

  9. ヒトスジシマカの聴覚コミュニケーションを制御する概日リズムの機構解明 International coauthorship

    Grant number:20F20386  2020.11 - 2023.3

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費助成事業 特別研究員奨励費  特別研究員奨励費

    上川内 あづさ, SU MATTHEW, 上川内 あづさ, SU MATTHEW

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    Authorship:Other 

    Developing new methods of mosquito control is essential, but requires improving current knowledge of basic mosquito biology. This project focuses on exploring the mechanisms underlying mosquito hearing behaviours, which form a key part of courtship, in order to develop novel control methodologies. We will investigate how the circadian clock influences mosquito hearing capabilities, and the effect of clock gene knockout on mating. After identifying genes which affect mating behaviour, we will test whether exposing mosquitoes to insecticides which interfere with the clock can inhibit courtship.
    蚊は吸血することで感染症を媒介し、多くの人を死に至らしめる。蚊の吸血は、交尾後のメスが産卵のための栄養源を得る行動である。よって、蚊の被害を防ぐ方策の一つとして、配偶行動への介入が考えられる。本研究では、世界各地でデング熱やジカ熱を媒介するヤブ蚊類2種(ネッタイシマカ、ヒトスジシマカ)を対象に、聴覚を介した配偶行動の原理とその神経基盤を理解し、繁殖制御への新たな道を探ることを目的とする。
    <BR>
    今年度は、研究室内でオスの聴覚を介した配偶行動を解析できる実験系を立ち上げた。この行動は、蚊柱を作って飛行中のオスが、メスの羽音を検知して接近する、というものである。日周期をコントロールした恒温室の中にオス集団を入れ、メスの羽音を模した人工音をスピーカーから再生した。その結果、ネッタイシマカにおいて、特定の周波数の純音を発するスピーカーへの接近飛行を誘発できた。一方でヒトスジシマカでは、純音を発するスピーカーへの接近飛行は誘発されなかった。種に固有の、接近飛行を引き起こす条件があると予想される。
    <BR>
    また、オスやメスの発する羽音の測定系も確立した。前述の実験と同じように日周期をコントロールした恒温室の中に、固定下で飛行させることが可能なようにワイヤーを取り付けたオスまたはメスを入れ、小型マイクで羽音を測定した。測定した羽音の周波数を分析し、主要な周波数を特定した。また、集団で飛行するオスやメスからも、羽音の主要な周波数を特定することに成功した。これにより、特定の時刻や温度におけるそれぞれの羽音を解析するための実験系が整備できた。今後は、羽音の変化がどのように接近飛行に影響を与えるのかを解析する予定である。
    本研究の目的は、ネッタイシマカとヒトスジシマカ、という2種類のヤブ蚊を対象として、配偶行動に重要な機能を持つ聴覚系の動作原理や聴覚行動の神経基盤の理解を進めることで、繁殖制御への新たな道を探ることである。これを実施するためには、実験室内で聴覚を介した配偶行動を再現する必要があるが、初年度にその立ち上げに成功した。さらにオスが示す特定の周波数への音への接近飛行も、人工音を用いることで実験室での再現に成功した。来年度はこの実験系を使うことで、蚊の配偶行動を制御する重要な要素である、聴覚機構の解明が大きく進展することが期待できる。
    <BR>
    また本研究では、上記解析を通じて、繁殖制御への新たな道を探ることも目的としている。ここまでの解析により、人工的に作成した音を用いてオスの接近飛行を誘発することに成功している。そこで、オスが示すこの性質を利用して蚊を捕集することができる音トラップを試作した。実験室内で使用した結果、オスの蚊を集めることに成功した。そこで、これに続いて野外での試験を実施し、その結果を受けて現在改良を進めている。
    雌雄の羽音が混在する蚊柱の中で、オスがどのようにしてメスの微弱な羽音を検出するのか?という謎を解くため、下記2項目の解析を進める。
    <BR>
    ①聴覚を介した接近飛行の駆動原理の解明
    ここまでの解析により、人工音を用いた行動解析により、オスの(メス羽音源への)接近飛行を惹起する音成分を同定した。しかし野外での音トラップをデザインするためには、温度変化による影響も考慮する必要がある。実際に、雌雄ともに羽音の主要周波数は気温により変化することが知られている。そこで今年度は、様々な温度域において音源への接近飛行行動を測定する。これにより、温度と接近飛行行動との関係性を解明する。また、聴覚器の感度も、温度変化に対応している可能性がある。そこでレーザードップラー振動計を用いて、様々な温度域における聴覚器振動の特性を解析する。これにより、2種のヤブ蚊それぞれが示す、聴覚を介した接近飛行の駆動原理を解明する。
    ②聴覚系の遠心性制御機構の解明
    哺乳類では、脳からの遠心性神経投射が聴覚器感度を能動的に制御する。ネッタイシマカとヒトスジシマカにおいても、脳から聴覚器への遠心性神経投射の存在が示唆されている。そこで本項目では、遠心性神経投射に関わる可能性がある神経修飾物質が、聴覚機能に与える影響を解析する。まずはRT-PCRにより、オクトパミンとセロトニン(あるいは他の神経修飾物質)の受容体遺伝子が、聴感覚細胞で発現するか確かめる。次に、同定した受容体の機能を阻害し、聴覚系への影響を調べる。これら解析から、神経修飾物質を介した聴覚系の感度制御機構を理解する。

  10. 歌識別能力の発達を担う神経機構の解明 International coauthorship

    Grant number:20H03355  2020.4 - 2023.3

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費助成事業 基盤研究(B)  基盤研究(B)

    上川内 あづさ

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\17680000 ( Direct Cost: \13600000 、 Indirect Cost:\4080000 )

    幼児は成長初期に母語に曝されることで、その言語が持つ音の特徴を識別する能力が育つ。このような言語発達のメカニズムを理解するためには、ヒトでの研究に加えて、実験操作が行えるモデル動物での研究が有用である。近年我々は、言語学習の神経機構を解析するモデルとして、ショウジョウバエの歌識別学習パラダイムを確立した。本研究の目的は、この実験系を用いて、歌の識別能力の発達を担う神経回路機構を解明することである。ヒトと進化的にかけ離れたショウジョウバエで研究を進めることで、言語・歌学習を支える神経機構の多点比較が初めて可能となり、脊椎動物とも共通する一般原理の抽出や、多様性の理解が大幅に進むと期待される。

  11. 歌識別学習を制御する記憶システムの分子基盤 International coauthorship

    Grant number:20H04997  2020.4 - 2022.3

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費助成事業 新学術領域研究(研究領域提案型)  新学術領域研究(研究領域提案型)

    上川内 あづさ

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\7540000 ( Direct Cost: \5800000 、 Indirect Cost:\1740000 )

    ヒトは生育時の言語環境により、特定の言語に特有な音の識別能力を発達させる。この識別能力は、生得的な能力を基盤として、周囲の会話を聞くなどの生育時の聴覚経験により発達する。このような、聴覚経験に依存した音識別能力の発達基盤として、記憶・学習機構の介在が考えられるが、その分子神経機構は未解明である。そこで本研究計画では、「豊富な分子遺伝学ツール」「同定された操作可能な聴覚神経回路」という実験上の優位性を持つショウジョウバエを新たな解析モデルと捉えて、記憶の制御分子がどのようにして歌識別学習を成立させるかを解明する。

  12. 求愛中のショウジョウバエを用いた追跡ナビゲーションを制御する神経機構の解明 International coauthorship

    Grant number:19H04933  2019.4 - 2021.3

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費助成事業 新学術領域研究(研究領域提案型)  新学術領域研究(研究領域提案型)

    上川内 あづさ

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\9750000 ( Direct Cost: \7500000 、 Indirect Cost:\2250000 )

    ナビゲーション中の動物は、さまざまな情報を手掛かりにして移動方向を調整し、ターゲットに到達する。その間、脳はどのようにして、多様な感覚情報を統合して移動戦略を決定し、ナビゲーション行動を制御するのだろうか? 本研究では、ショウジョウバエのオスが複数の感覚情報を手掛かりに求愛相手に向かう追跡行動をナビゲーション行動のモデルとして、この謎に挑むことを目的とした。
    <BR>
    当該年度では、異なるモダリティの感覚情報がそれぞれどの行動要素を誘発するか、感覚刺激の組み合わせによってどのような行動が誘発されるか、の解析を進めた。本研究のために開発した、単一オス個体の求愛追跡行動を定量できる、球状トレッドミルを用いた行動計測系を用いて、視覚刺激(前方で左右に動く、求愛行動対象のメス)に加えて、求愛歌やフェロモンを組み合わせて与えた際の、オスの追跡行動を計測した。ついで、得られた行動データを、機械学習を用いた時系列データ分析法などで解析し、それぞれの感覚刺激に応じた追跡行動が、どのような特徴量を持つ行動要素の組み合わせで生じるかを決定した。求愛歌やフェロモンのどちらかだけを組み合わせた場合と両方を与えた場合での、行動要素の差を解析することで、異なる感覚刺激の組み合わせと、それにより誘発される行動要素との相関関係を調査した。
    <BR>
    さらに、求愛追跡行動を担う司令中枢ニューロンの作用機序の手がかりを得るため、司令中枢ニューロンを光遺伝学を用いて活性化した際の、求愛追跡行動を解析した。これにより、この司令中枢ニューロンの活性化操作により誘発される行動要素を絞り込んだ。さらに、より自然な状態下での求愛追跡行動を調べるため、自由行動が可能な複数のオスとメスを入れた観察用の容器を用いて、個体ごとの移動トラッキングおよび行動様式のアノテーションを行なった。

  13. ショウジョウバエをモデルとした歌学習機構の解明 International coauthorship

    Grant number:18H05069  2018.4 - 2020.3

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費助成事業 新学術領域研究(研究領域提案型)  新学術領域研究(研究領域提案型)

    上川内 あづさ

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\7930000 ( Direct Cost: \6100000 、 Indirect Cost:\1830000 )

    幼児は成長初期に母語に曝されることで、その言語が持つ音の特徴を識別する能力を獲得する。言語発達のメカニズムを理解するためのモデルとして用いられるキンカチョウなどの鳴禽類においても、幼少期の歌を聴く、という経験がその後の歌識別に必要である。このような言語や歌の識別能力が発達するためのメカニズムを理解するため、本研究では、分子・神経回路研究の手法が発達したキイロショウジョウバエを新たな「歌識別学習モデル」として用いることで、これらの機構の解明に取り組んだ。
    まず、キイロショウジョウバエが示す歌識別学習において、脊椎動物と同様に、(1)音経験が有効な「臨界期」と呼ばれる期間があるのか、(2)獲得した歌識別能力は生涯に渡って保持されるのか、という課題項目の解明を進め、結果を得ることができた。これにより、キイロショウジョウバエが固有に持つ歌識別学習の特性が明らかになった。
    また、キイロショウジョウバエの歌識別学習に関わる責任因子の同定も進めた。責任ニューロンとしてGABAニューロンが機能する、という以前の発見を基にして、intersection法によりGABAニューロンを脳と胸腹部神経節のどちらかに細胞体を持つか、を指標に分類した。さらに、脳のGABAニューロンを4種類の部分集団に分類した。次に、これらの部分集団を選択的に遺伝子操作可能なショウジョウバエ系統を作成した。また、歌識別学習の分子機構として記憶の制御に関わるcAMP情報伝達系に着目した解析を進めた。cAMP情報伝達系を構成するタンパク質をコードする遺伝子の発現を特定の細胞群で抑制するキイロショウジョウバエ系統を作成し、行動解析を行った。

  14. Exploring the mechanism of frequency tuning of auditory sensory neurons in flies International coauthorship

    Grant number:17K19450  2017.6 - 2021.3

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Challenging Research (Exploratory)  Challenging Research (Exploratory)

    Kamikouchi Azusa

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\6370000 ( Direct Cost: \4900000 、 Indirect Cost:\1470000 )

    The Drosophila auditory sensory neurons are mainly comprised of two types of populations with different frequency characteristics. We investigated the mechanisms that shape this frequency response. First, we found that calcium-dependent potassium channels are expressed in auditory sensory neurons. We also found that the interacting factors of calcium-dependent potassium channels may be involved in the flies' response to courtship song stimuli. Furthermore, we found that auditory sensory neurons are housed inside the scolopidium in pairs with any of three types of displacement-responsive neurons. We also suggested that the response of auditory sensory neurons is regulated by neurotransmitter-mediated modulation from the brain.

  15. Evolutionary origin of the neural mechanisms underlying sexual isolation of Drosophila

    Grant number:17K19425  2017.6 - 2019.3

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Grant-in-Aid for Challenging Research (Exploratory)  Grant-in-Aid for Challenging Research (Exploratory)

    Ishikawa Yuki, Kamikouchi Azusa

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    Animals often avoid to mate with heterospecific individuals. To understand the neural mechanism underlying the evolution of this behavioral sexual isolation, we focused on Drosophila species, whose sexual isolation mostly depends to cuticular pheromone. First, we screened and identified the sensory neurons which detect heterospecific pheromone and decreases courtship activity. Our further observation of the downstream neurons of these neurons suggests that the acquisition of neural connection between the sensory neurons and the inhibitory downstream neurons contributes the evolution of sexual isolation via heterospecific pheromones.

  16. Elucidation of the neural circuits responsible for species-specific sound recognition International coauthorship

    Grant number:16H04655  2016.4 - 2020.3

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B)  Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B)

    Kamikouchi Azusa

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\16120000 ( Direct Cost: \12400000 、 Indirect Cost:\3720000 )

    Although many animals, including humans, use sound as a means of communication, the overall picture of the neural mechanisms responsible for the information processing has not been clarified. In this study, we used the Drosophila auditory system as an experimental model to understand the neural circuit mechanism for auditory information processing, such as recognizing species-specific communication sounds. We found that the pulse interval-selective response of AMMC-B1 neurons, which are secondary auditory neurons that play a central role in courtship song information processing, is formed by a feed-forward inhibitory pathway that is mainly driven by GABA-mediated inhibitory input.

  17. Neural mechanisms regulating the habituation levels in the fly brain

    Grant number:16K18362  2016.4 - 2018.3

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B)  Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B)

    Morimoto Nao, KAMIKOUCHI Azusa, OSAKADA Fumitaka

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    Animals decrease response to stimuli when they are exposed to the useless stimuli for a long time. This is habituation. However, as the stimuli are valuable, animals have to respond to them. Such neural mechanisms of regulating the habituation levels depending on the stimulus relevance are unknown. In this study, using fruit fly’s typical auditory behavior related to courtship behavior, I identified subset of neurons which are contributed to the neural mechanisms of regulating the habituation levels depending on the relevance.

  18. Central regulation of the decision make process for mating behavior in Drosophila International coauthorship

    Grant number:15K07147  2015.4 - 2018.3

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C)  Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C)

    Ishimoto Hiroshi, KAMIKOUCHI AZUSA, YAMADA DAICHI

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    Authorship:Collaborating Investigator(s) (not designated on Grant-in-Aid) 

    Females make a decision whether to accept or reject the copulation during a series of courtship ritual. This mutual courtship process is widely appeared in many animal species, however, little is known about the neuronal and molecular mechanisms of higher-order functions underlying this female behavioral switch during courtship ritual. Here, I explored the neuronal nature of the female decision make for the proper copulation in Drosophila melanogaster. Then I found that a feedforward circuit motif was composed of the DA targeting neurons that were divided into at least two structural and functional classes, one positively modulates courtship rejection and the other class, composed by GABAergic neurons, negatively modulates courtship rejection. Each neural class required different types of dopamine receptors. These findings may possibly provide perspectives on how behavioral switches controlled at the neural circuit level.

  19. Neural mechanisms underlying the evolution of mating preference

    Grant number:26870264  2014.4 - 2017.3

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B)  Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B)

    Ishikawa Yuki, KAMIKOUCHI Azusa

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    Species-specific mating preference plays important role for the generation and maintenance of biodiversity. However, what kind of change in neural circuits causes the evolution of the preference is largely unknown. To solve this question, I searched the difference of neural circuit causing the species difference of pheromone and song preference in Drosophila. As a result, I found several differences in the neural circuits, which might be involved in the species difference of these preferences. These findings may provide clues to understand how the mating preference to conspecific individuals has been acquired during evolutionary process.

  20. Neural mechanism underlying the auditory memory in fruit flies International coauthorship

    Grant number:25115007  2013.6 - 2018.3

    Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (Research in a proposed research area)

    Kamikouchi Azusa

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\90480000 ( Direct Cost: \69600000 、 Indirect Cost:\20880000 )

    Many animals use the courtship sound in their mating behaviors. The courtship sound emitted by the sender gradually affects the receiver’s mating drive, which finally leads to its rejection of acceptance. We studied how the courtship sound is accumulated in the receiver’s brain and evokes an appropriate mating decision. Firstly, we mapped the auditory neural circuits in the fly brain by identifying interneurons that project to the primary auditory center. Secondly, we identified the feed-forward circuit that tunes the selectivity for a species-specific rhythm in the courtship sound. Finally, we found that an experience of hearing the conspecific song as a young adult sharpens the song preference and mate selection as a breeding adult. Together, we revealed a mechanism underlying the information processing and memory formation of the courtship sound in the fruit-fly brain.

  21. Principles of memory dynamics elucidated from a diversity of learning systems International coauthorship

    Grant number:25115001  2013.6 - 2018.3

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (Research in a proposed research area)  Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (Research in a proposed research area)

    SAITOE Minoru, IINO Yuichi, YOSHIHARA Yoshihiro, KAMIKOUCHI Azusa, ISHIHARA Takeshi, INOKUCHI Kaoru, MATSUO Naoki

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    Authorship:Collaborating Investigator(s) (not designated on Grant-in-Aid) 

    Memory is dynamic and memory mechanism is changed depending on internal and external condition. In our research area, we have studied how such dynamics of memory and plasticity of memory mechanisms occur. To this end we employed a combination of different animal models, each of which has useful phenotypes and methodological advantages in areas of memory research. We had annual meetings, workshops and international symposium to exchange our findings and promote discussion timely. We also had young scientists symposium to give a chance to young scientists to appeal their findings and significance of their research. Accordingly, we have identified memory principle commonly used in most organisms, as well as mechanism that are specific to a particular organism. Hence, we have made great advances in the concept of memory dynamism and results from our research area have been published in number of prestige and high impact journals.

  22. Auditory system of flies as a new model to study the short-term memory International coauthorship

    Grant number:25640010  2013.4 - 2016.3

    Kamikouchi Azusa

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\4030000 ( Direct Cost: \3100000 、 Indirect Cost:\930000 )

    To start a high-through put analysis of the acoustic behavior of fruit flies, we developed an automatic system'ChaIN', to quantify the typical acoustic behavior of flies using machine-vision. By using this ChaIN software, we analyzed the acoustic behavior in response to sound of different patterns and found that the flies changed their response behavior immediately after the sound shift.This behavioral change was observed even in a memory mutant strain that lacks the rutabaga adenylyl cyclase gene, showing that the neural mechanism that discriminates sound patterns is independent of this gene. This project established a novel method to explore the neural mechanism how the brain discriminates different temporal pattern of acoustic stimuli.

  23. Exploring the dynamics and structure of the auditory system in fruit flies International coauthorship

    Grant number:25710001  2013.4 - 2016.3

    Kamikouchi Azusa

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\26260000 ( Direct Cost: \20200000 、 Indirect Cost:\6060000 )

    To explore the neural mechanism how the brain discriminates acoustic information, we have been using the fruit fly as an excellent model animal. To further develop the research of the auditory system using fruit flies, we mapped the auditory neural circuit in the fly brain at the single-cell level. By doing so we established a comprehensive map of the central auditory neural circuits, which would serve a basic knowledge to analyze the mechanism of auditory information processing in the brain in general.

  24. 聴覚情報処理を担う機能モジュールの体系的な同定と解析 International coauthorship

    Grant number:23115717  2011.4 - 2013.3

    新学術領域研究(研究領域提案型)

    上川内 あづさ

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    Authorship:Principal investigator 

    Grant amount:\7020000 ( Direct Cost: \5400000 、 Indirect Cost:\1620000 )

    動物の脳は、感覚器によって受容された音がその個体にとって意味を持つか否かを瞬時に判別できる。しかし、どのような神経回路がどのような組み合わせで動作した結果、そのような判断を導いているのか、その神経機構は不明である。本研究課題では、動物の脳が音情報を認識する神経機構の解明を目指している。今年度は、前年度に確立したショウジョウバエの聴覚情報処理システムを解析する上で必要となる行動解析方法を利用して、野生型個体を用いた体系的な聴覚行動解析を行った。多様な人工音を作成してそれら刺激に対する応答行動を解析した結果、反応の閾値、刺激選択性、時間に伴う行動変化などを体系的に解明することができた。この結果は,今後、聴覚応答の選択性を担う責任遺伝子や責任回路を同定するための,必要不可欠な知見を提供すると期待できる。また、聴覚システムを構成する神経細胞群の解剖学的な同定解析も進めた。以前から使用している約4,000種類のGAL4エンハンサートラップ系統に加えて、今年度はさらに、脳画像データが公開されている7017種類のGAL4系統(アメリカ、Janelia farm由来)のスクリーニングを行い,解析に有用な系統群を同定した。これら系統群は,今後、聴覚神経回路の構成やその機能を調べて行く上で、重要なツールとなる。以上,本研究においてはショウジョウバエ聴覚系を体系的に解析するための基盤を構築するとともに、ショウジョウバエが示す聴覚行動の新規な特性を明らかにした。
    24年度が最終年度であるため、記入しない。
    24年度が最終年度であるため、記入しない。

  25. Comprehensive analysis of the higher-order auditory circuit in the fruit-fly brain International coauthorship

    Grant number:21700360  2009 - 2011

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B)  Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B)

    KAMIKOUCHI Azusa

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    Authorship:Principal investigator  Grant type:Competitive

    Grant amount:\4420000 ( Direct Cost: \3400000 、 Indirect Cost:\1020000 )

    The aim of this research project is to clarify the neuronal basis that translate a given sound into meaningful neural signals in a brain. During the period of the project, we screened 3, 939 GAL4 enhancer-trap strains to visualizes the central auditory circuit in a fly brain. 3-dimensional high-resolution analysis of these brain established a map for the neural circuit formed by the 2nd-order auditory neurons. Such neuroanatomical map for auditory Drosophila brain.

  26. ショウジョウバエの聴覚行動を制御する神経回路基盤の解明 International coauthorship

    Grant number:21115515  2009 - 2010

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費助成事業 新学術領域研究(研究領域提案型)  新学術領域研究(研究領域提案型)

    上川内 あづさ

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    Authorship:Principal investigator  Grant type:Competitive

    Grant amount:\7800000 ( Direct Cost: \6000000 、 Indirect Cost:\1800000 )

    特定の二次聴覚神経の遮断を行った個体を用いた行動実験を行うため、まずは条件検討を行った。神経伝達を阻害する蛋白質であるShi^<ts1>、テタヌス毒素、内向き整流カリウムチャネルを時期特異的に二次聴覚神経AMMC-B1に発現させ、雌雄間の配偶行動が音により促進される効果を解析した。その結果、本行動実験においては、テタヌス毒素が最も効率的に阻害効果を示すことが判明した。よって今後の解析においては、テタヌス毒素を用いて神経伝達阻害を行う。また、ショウジョウバエの配偶行動を活性化するために重要な音要素を体系的に同定するため、求愛歌音の改変を行った。求愛歌を構成するパルスソングやサインソング、といった種に特徴的な音要素の波形、パルス波どうしの間隔の周期的な振動パターンを改変した人工音を作成した。野生型個体を用いて、これら人工音が雌雄の配偶行動を活性化する度合いを定量化した結果、パルス波どうしの適正な間隔が,雌雄の配偶行動活性化に必要であることが判明した。以上,本年度の成果により、特定の二次聴覚経路の遮断効果を行動レベルで解析するための基礎データを得ることができた。今後はこの知見を利用し、それぞれの二次聴覚神経が形成する神経経路で行われる処理様式や機能の解明に取り組む予定である。

  27. ショウジョウバエの高次聴覚神経細胞が形成する全回路構造の包括的解明

    2009 - 2010

    三菱財団  自然科学研究助成 

    上川内あづさ

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    Authorship:Principal investigator  Grant type:Competitive

  28. ショウジョウバエ聴覚神経系の構造と機能の包括的な解明

    Grant number:08J02636  2008

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費助成事業 特別研究員奨励費  特別研究員奨励費

    上川内 あづさ

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    本年度は、ショウジョウバエが音・重力・風の情報を検知するための感覚神経と脳中枢を解析し、ショウジョウバエの「耳」にあたる触角の付け根にある数種類の感覚神経(ジョンストン器官神経)が、触角の小さな振動に強く反応する細胞と、一定の方向への持続的な変位(角度の変化)に強く反応する細胞とに分類できることを発見した。細胞特異的に神経毒素を発現させてそれぞれの細胞群の神経伝達を特異的に遮断した個体群の行動を解析したところ、前者を遮断すると音に対する応答行動が、後者を遮断すると重力に対する応答行動が、それぞれ特異的に失われた。さらに、音を検知する神経と重力を検知する神経は脳内の別々の中枢に分かれて投射しており、これらの中枢の神経回路は、人間の脳の聴覚や重力感覚の中枢の回路とそれぞれよく似た構造になっていることを発見した。また、ショウジョウバエは強い風が来ると身構えて飛ばされないようにする習性がある。強い風は重力と同じように、触角の傾きを変化させる。このような風検知も、重力と同じ脳中枢で処理されていることを見出した。ショウジョウバエと人間は進化の過程で6億年以上前に分かれた、別々の枝のそれぞれ先端に位置している。このように進化的に遠く離れたショウジョウバエと人間において音や重力の情報処理回路が似ていることは、特定の種類の情報を処理するために最適な方法を求めてそれぞれが独自に進化した結果、同じような構造に行き着いた収斂進化の可能性を示している。

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Teaching Experience (On-campus) 5

  1. 分子遺伝学Ⅱ

    2017

  2. 基礎遺伝学Ⅲ

    2017

  3. 細胞学Ⅱ

    2016

  4. Cell Biology

    2015

  5. Genetics

    2013

Teaching Experience (Off-campus) 7

  1. 基礎遺伝学

    名古屋大学 理学研究科)

  2. 細胞学II

    名古屋大学 理学研究科)

  3. 科学英語

    Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science)

  4. 知能システム特別講義

    東京工業大学 大学院総合理工学研究科)

  5. 生命科学実習

    Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science)

  6. Genetics

    名古屋大学 理学研究科)

  7. グローバルCOEプログラム ニューロサイエンスコース

    名古屋大学 医学系研究科)

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