Updated on 2021/06/07

写真a

 
MORITA Yasuhiro
 
Organization
Asian Satellite Campuses Institute Division2 Designated associate professor
Graduate School
Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences
Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences
Title
Designated associate professor

Degree 1

  1. 博士(獣医学) ( 2016.9   山口大学 ) 

 

Papers 18

  1. Gene-expression profile and postpartum transition of bovine endometrial side population cells†. Reviewed International journal

    Ryoki Tatebayashi, Sho Nakamura, Shiori Minabe, Tadashi Furusawa, Ryoya Abe, Miki Kajisa, Yasuhiro Morita, Satoshi Ohkura, Koji Kimura, Shuichi Matsuyama

    Biology of reproduction   Vol. 104 ( 4 ) page: 850 - 860   2021.4

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    Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    The mechanism of bovine endometrial regeneration after parturition remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized that bovine endometrial stem/progenitor cells participate in the postpartum regeneration of the endometrium. Flow cytometry analysis identified the presence of side population (SP) cells among endometrial stromal cells. Endometrial SP cells were shown to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes. RNA-seq data showed that the gene expression pattern was different between bovine endometrial SP cells and main population cells. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis identified the enrichment of stemness genes in SP cells. Significantly (false discovery rate < 0.01) upregulated genes in SP cells contained several stem cell marker genes. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of the upregulated genes in SP cells showed enrichment of terms related to RNA metabolic process and transcription. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis of upregulated genes in SP cells revealed enrichment of signaling pathways associated with maintenance and differentiation of stem/progenitor cells. The terms involved in TCA cycles were enriched in GO and KEGG pathway analysis of downregulated genes in SP cells. These results support the assumption that bovine endometrial SP cells exhibit characteristics of somatic stem/progenitor cells. The ratio of SP cells to endometrial cells was lowest on days 9-11 after parturition, which gradually increased thereafter. SP cells were shown to differentiate into epithelial cells. Collectively, these results suggest that bovine endometrial SP cells were temporarily reduced immediately after calving possibly due to their differentiation to provide new endometrial cells.

    DOI: 10.1093/biolre/ioab004

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  2. Nutritional condition in the dry period is related to the incidence of postpartum subclinical endometritis in dairy cattle

    Taniguchi Asako, Nishikawa Tatsuya, Morita Yasuhiro

    ANIMAL BIOSCIENCE   Vol. 34 ( 4 ) page: 539 - 545   2021.4

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    Publisher:Animal Bioscience  

    DOI: 10.5713/ajas.20.0198

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  3. Neurokinin 3 receptor-selective agonist, senktide, decreases core temperature in Japanese Black cattle

    Nakamura S., Miwa M., Morita Y., Ohkura S., Yamamura T., Wakabayashi Y., Matsuyama S.

    DOMESTIC ANIMAL ENDOCRINOLOGY   Vol. 74   2021.1

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    Publisher:Domestic Animal Endocrinology  

    DOI: 10.1016/j.domaniend.2020.106522

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    Scopus

  4. Seasonal changes in the reproductive performance in local cows receiving artificial insemination in the Pursat province of Cambodia. Reviewed International coauthorship International journal

    Bengthay Tep, Yasuhiro Morita, Shuichi Matsuyama, Satoshi Ohkura, Naoko Inoue, Hiroko Tsukamura, Yoshihisa Uenoyama, Vutha Pheng

    Asian-Australasian journal of animal sciences   Vol. 33 ( 12 ) page: 1922 - 1929   2020.12

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    Authorship:Lead author   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    Objective: The present study aimed to survey seasonal changes in reproductive performance in local cows receiving artificial insemination (AI) in the Pursat province of Cambodia, a tropical country, to investigate if ambient conditions affect the reproductive performance of cows as to better understand the major problems regarding cattle production. Methods: The number of cows receiving AI, resultant number of calving and calving rate were analyzed for those receiving the first AI from 2016 to 2017. The year was divided into three seasons: cool/dry (from November to February), hot/dry (from March to June), and wet (from July to October), based on the maximal temperature and rainfall in Pursat, to analyze the relationship between ambient conditions and the reproductive performance of cows. Body condition scores (BCS) and feeding schemes were also analyzed in these seasons. Results: The number of cows receiving AI was significantly higher in the cool/dry season than the wet season. The number of calving and calving rate were significantly higher in cows receiving AI in the cool/dry season compared with the hot/dry and wet seasons. The cows showed higher BCSs in the cool/dry season compared to the hot/dry and wet seasons probably due to the seasonal changes in the feeding schemes: These cows grazed on wild grasses in the cool/dry season but fed with a limited amount of grasses and straw in the hot/dry and wet seasons. Conclusion: The present study suggests that the low number of cows receiving AI, low number of calving and low calving rate could be mainly due to poor body condition as a result of the poor feeding schemes during the hot/dry and wet seasons. The improvement of body condition by the refinement of feeding schemes may contribute to an increase in the reproductive performance in cows during the hot/dry and wet seasons in Cambodia.

    DOI: 10.5713/ajas.19.0893

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  5. Facilitatory and inhibitory role of central amylin administration in the regulation of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulse generator activity in goats. Reviewed International journal

    Yuri Kitagawa, Takuya Sasaki, Reika Suzumura, Ai Morishima, Ryoki Tatebayashi, Assadullah, Nahoko Ieda, Yasuhiro Morita, Shuichi Matsuyama, Naoko Inoue, Yoshihisa Uenoyama, Hiroko Tsukamura, Satoshi Ohkura

    Neuroscience letters   Vol. 736   page: 135276 - 135276   2020.9

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    Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    Pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion is essential for regulating reproductive functions in mammals. GnRH pulses are governed by a neural mechanism that is termed the GnRH pulse generator. In the present study, we investigated the role of central calcitonin receptor (CTR) signaling in the regulation of the GnRH pulse generator activity in ovariectomized goats by administering amylin, an endogenous ligand for CTR, into the lateral ventricle. GnRH pulse generator activity was measured using multiple unit activity (MUA) recordings in the mediobasal hypothalamus. We analyzed changes in the interval of characteristic increases in MUA (MUA volleys). The MUA volley interval shortened immediately after amylin administration, followed by prolonged intervals. Double in situ hybridization for KISS1 (kisspeptin gene) and CALCR (CTR gene) revealed that low expression levels of CALCR were found in the arcuate kisspeptin neurons, which is suggested as the main population of neurons, involved in GnRH pulse generator activity. These results suggest that central amylin-CTR signaling has a biphasic role in the regulation of GnRH pulse generator activity by acting on cells other than the arcuate kisspeptin neurons in goats.

    DOI: 10.1016/j.neulet.2020.135276

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  6. Peripheral administration of SB223412, a selective neurokinin-3 receptor antagonist, suppresses pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion by acting on the gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulse generator in estrogen-treated ovariectomized female goats.

    Sasaki T, Sonoda T, Tatebayashi R, Kitagawa Y, Oishi S, Yamamoto K, Fujii N, Inoue N, Uenoyama Y, Tsukamura H, Maeda KI, Matsuda F, Morita Y, Matsuyama S, Ohkura S

    The Journal of reproduction and development   Vol. 66 ( 4 ) page: 351 - 357   2020.8

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    Publisher:Journal of Reproduction and Development  

    <p> Accumulating evidence suggests that KNDy neurons located in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), which are reported to express kisspeptin, neurokinin B, and dynorphin A, are indispensable for the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generation that results in rhythmic GnRH secretion. The aims of the present study were to investigate the effects of peripheral administration of the neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R/TACR3, a receptor for neurokinin B) antagonist, SB223412, on GnRH pulse-generating activity and pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in ovariectomized Shiba goats treated with luteal phase levels of estrogen. The NK3R antagonist was infused intravenously for 4 h {0.16 or 1.6 mg/(kg body weight [BW]·4 h)} during which multiple unit activity (MUA) in the ARC was recorded, an electrophysiological technique commonly employed to monitor GnRH pulse generator activity. In a separate experiment, the NK3R antagonist (40 or 200 mg/[kg BW·day]) was administered orally for 7 days to determine whether the NK3R antagonist could modulate pulsatile LH secretion when administered via the oral route. Intravenous infusion of the NK3R antagonist significantly increased the interval of episodic bursts of MUA compared with that of the controls. Oral administration of the antagonist for 7 days also significantly prolonged the interpulse interval of LH pulses. The results of this study demonstrate that peripheral administration of an NK3R antagonist suppresses pulsatile LH secretion by acting on the GnRH pulse generator, suggesting that NK3R antagonist administration could be used to modulate reproductive functions in ruminants.</p>

    DOI: 10.1262/jrd.2019-145

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  7. Establishment of long-term chronic recording technique of in vivo ovarian parenchymal temperature in Japanese Black cows.

    Morita Y, Ozaki R, Mukaiyama A, Sasaki T, Tatebayashi R, Morishima A, Kitagawa Y, Suzumura R, Abe R, Tsukamura H, Matsuyama S, Ohkura S

    The Journal of reproduction and development   Vol. 66 ( 3 ) page: 271 - 275   2020.6

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    Publisher:Journal of Reproduction and Development  

    <p> The reproductive performance of cattle can be suppressed by heat stress. Reproductive organ temperature, especially ovarian temperature, may affect follicle development and ovulation. The establishment of a technique for long-term measurement of ovarian temperature could prove useful in understanding the mechanisms underlying the temperature-dependent changes in follicular development and subsequent ovulation in cows. Here we report a novel method facilitating long-term and continuous recording of ovarian parenchymal temperature in cows. The method revealed that the ovarian temperature in the luteal phase was constantly maintained lower than the vaginal temperature, and that the diurnal temperature variation in the ovary was significantly greater than that in the vagina, suggesting that the ovaries may require a lower temperature than other organs to maintain their functions. This novel method could be used for the further understanding of ovarian functions during estrous cycles in cows.</p>

    DOI: 10.1262/jrd.2019-097

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  8. Gene expression analysis and postpartum transition of bovine endometrial side population cells

    TATEBAYASHI Ryoki, MATSUYAMA Shuichi, NAKAMURA Sho, MINABE Shiori, FURUSAWA Tadashi, ABE Ryoya, KAJISA Miki, MORITA Yasuhiro, OHKURA Satoshi, KIMURA Koji

    The Journal of Reproduction and Development Supplement   Vol. 113 ( 0 ) page: AW1 - 4-AW1-4   2020

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    Publisher:THE SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT  

    DOI: 10.14882/jrds.113.0_AW1-4

  9. Elucidation of the factor in ovulation failure under heat condition in Japanese Black cows

    MUKAIYAMA Akihisa, TATEBAYASHI Ryoki, KITAGAWA Yuri, ABE Ryoya, SUZUMURA Reika, MATSUYAMA Shuichi, SATOSHI Ohkura, MORITA Yasuhiro

    The Journal of Reproduction and Development Supplement   Vol. 113 ( 0 ) page: P - 10-P-10   2020

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    Publisher:THE SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT  

    DOI: 10.14882/jrds.113.0_P-10

  10. Changes in accumulation level of senescent cells in bovine endometrium after parturition

    KAJISA Miki, TATEBAYASHI Ryoki, ABE Ryoya, MORITA Yasuhiro, OHKURA Satoshi, MATSUYAMA Shuichi

    The Journal of Reproduction and Development Supplement   Vol. 113 ( 0 ) page: P - 72-P-72   2020

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    Publisher:THE SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT  

    DOI: 10.14882/jrds.113.0_P-72

  11. Effects of methylglyoxal on bovine endometrial cells

    ABE Ryoya, TATEBAYASHI Ryoki, KAJISA Miki, MORITA Yasuhiro, OHKURA Satoshi, MATUYAMA Shuichi

    The Journal of Reproduction and Development Supplement   Vol. 113 ( 0 ) page: P - 69-P-69   2020

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    Publisher:THE SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT  

    DOI: 10.14882/jrds.113.0_P-69

  12. Analysis of the involvement of serotonin receptor subtype in the regulation of GnRH pulse generator activity in Shiba goats

    SUZUMURA Reika, MORITA Yasuhiro, MATSUYAMA Shuichi, SASAKI Takuya, KITAGAWA Yuri, INOUE Naoko, UENOYAMA Yoshihisa, TSUKAMURA Hiroko, OHKURA Satoshi

    The Journal of Reproduction and Development Supplement   Vol. 113 ( 0 ) page: P - 4-P-4   2020

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    Publisher:THE SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT  

    DOI: 10.14882/jrds.113.0_P-4

  13. Diagnostic efficacy of imaging and biopsy methods for peritoneal mesothelioma in a calf. Reviewed

    Morita Y, Sugiyama S, Tsuka T, Okamoto Y, Morita T, Sunden Y, Takeuchi T

    BMC veterinary research   Vol. 15 ( 1 ) page: 461   2019.12

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  14. Peripheral administration of kappa-opioid receptor antagonist stimulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulse generator activity in ovariectomized, estrogen-treated female goats

    Sasaki T., Ito D., Sonoda T., Morita Y., Wakabayashi Y., Yamamura T., Okamura H., Oishi S., Noguchi T., Fujii N., Uenoyama Y., Tsukamura H., Maeda K. I, Matsuda F., Ohkura S.

    DOMESTIC ANIMAL ENDOCRINOLOGY   Vol. 68   page: 83 - 91   2019.7

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    Publisher:Domestic Animal Endocrinology  

    DOI: 10.1016/j.domaniend.2018.12.011

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  15. The role of calcitonin receptor in the regulation of pulsatile GnRH secretion

    YURI Kitagawa, OHKURA Satoshi, SASAKI Takuya, MORISHIMA Ai, TATEBAYASHI Ryoki, MORITA Yasuhiro, MATSUYAMA Shuichi, INOUE Naoko, UENOYAMA Yoshihisa, TSUKAMURA Hiroko

    The Journal of Reproduction and Development Supplement   Vol. 112 ( 0 ) page: P - 6-P-6   2019

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    Publisher:THE SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT  

    DOI: 10.14882/jrds.112.0_P-6

  16. The effect of NK3R-selective agonist on body temperature of cattle in summer season

    NAKAMURA Sho, MIWA Masafumi, MORITA Yasuhiro, YAMAMURA Takashi, WAKABAYASHI Yoshihiro, OHKURA Satoshi, MATSUYAMA Shuichi

    The Journal of Reproduction and Development Supplement   Vol. 112 ( 0 ) page: P - 7-P-7   2019

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    Publisher:THE SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT  

    DOI: 10.14882/jrds.112.0_P-7

  17. The role of serotonin in the regulation of the GnRH pulse generator activity in goats

    SASAKI Takuya, UENOYAMA Yoshihisa, TSUKAMURA Hiroko, OHKURA Satoshi, MORISHIMA Ai, NAKANISHI Marina, SUZUMURA Reika, TATEBAYASHI Ryoki, KITAGAWA Yuri, MORITA Yasuhiro, MATSUYAMA Shuichi, INOUE Naoko

    The Journal of Reproduction and Development Supplement   Vol. 112 ( 0 ) page: OR2 - 1-OR2-1   2019

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    Publisher:THE SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT  

    DOI: 10.14882/jrds.112.0_OR2-1

  18. Expression analysis of stem cell markers in bovine endometrial side population cells

    TATEBAYASHI Ryoki, NAKAMURA Sho, MINABE Shiori, FURUSAWA Tadashi, ABE Ryoya, MORITA Yasuhiro, OHKURA Satoshi, KIMURA Koji, MATSUYAMA Shuichi

    The Journal of Reproduction and Development Supplement   Vol. 112 ( 0 ) page: P - 79-P-79   2019

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    Publisher:THE SOCIETY FOR REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT  

    DOI: 10.14882/jrds.112.0_P-79

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